Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Indoor Sports Photography- Suggestions on a Budget
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Jan 13, 2020 16:04:12   #
LWW Loc: REDLEGS NATION
 
TriX wrote:
He’s shooting sports, and the highest priority is freezing the motion, so either shutter priority or better yet, manual with auto ISO is the mode of choice. You pick the minimum shutter speed to freeze the motion and an aperture that provides enough DOF without too high an ISO under worst case, and then, let the auto ISO take care of varying light conditions. Simple, especially with the OP’s FF 6D which can easily handle ISO 12,800 with acceptable noise.


Let me also add, and I’m using NIKON vernacular but it should translate well, for basketball I shoot in matrix metering mode.

For hockey, depending on venue I will sometimes spot meter.

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Jan 13, 2020 17:07:09   #
DBrock4316
 
I bought this lens in 2018 and I love it. I shoot a lot of indoor and outdoor sports.

Tamron SP A001 70-200mm f/2.8 LD Di Lens For Nikon, they are very reasonably priced. It's not a G2, but, it's not a $1600.00 lens either.

Good luck.

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Jan 13, 2020 17:12:41   #
tgreenhaw
 
Gene51 wrote:
Besides, no review or personal use has ever supported the notion that the faster lenses are sharp corner to corner when used wide open, though the 85 F1.8 is actually not bad at F1.8.

I'll go out on a limb stating that the Canon 85mm 1.4 IS is ultrasharp wide open at the corners :-)

"Goodness, you can see every detail on every blade of grass in the camera-original © file, and this is shot at f/1.4, where almost nothing is in focus, and it's ultrasharp out to the corners." - Ken Rockwell.

It is pretty much as sharp at the corners wide open at f1.4 as the Zeiss Planar T 85mm f1.4 is at f2.8 (https://www.opticallimits.com/canon_eos_ff/1039-canon85f14is?start=1 vs. https://www.opticallimits.com/nikon_ff/591-zeisszf8514ff?start=1)

I have learned that the 85mm f1.4 is a specialized lens wide open. Yes, you do get higher available light shutter speeds but the DOF is so narrow that you really have to know when to use it.

For indoor sports, IMHO good low noise high ISO and solid IS (or maybe a monopod) with a zoom in the f2.8 to f4 range is a better tool for the prosumer indoor sports job.

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Jan 13, 2020 17:21:53   #
tgreenhaw
 
LFingar - That's very impressive. DOF at f1.2 is about a foot and the EOS R autofocus nailed it.

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Jan 13, 2020 17:30:54   #
Thomas902 Loc: Washington DC
 
Webbie62 lots of contrasting thoughts in your thread...
Albeit I would strongly suggest you place your query in a Forum which actual has commercial sports photographers active. Maybe not so many endeavoring to justify their questionable purchases...

One thing for certain... shooting sport commercially is highly competitive only the best of the best survive...
And they actually know how to use their kit... enough said.

https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/s-103-1.html

FYI, when there is money in the mix everything changes...
All the best on your journey Webbie62

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Jan 13, 2020 17:39:25   #
bleirer
 
Nicholas DeSciose wrote:
Why are you using manual mode? I can’t think of anything worse. Use aperture priority or program. With an ISO of about 1000. The advice of a 50 mm or 85 mm is good


I don't know, manual with auto iso is pretty much aperture and shutter priority at the same time, in a sense. Pick your preferred shutter and preferred aperture both within reason and let the meter take care of the exposure via ISO.

Aperture priority for sports could make for blurred shots if the shutter is forced to slow down too much at the preferred aperture.

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Jan 13, 2020 17:40:42   #
LFingar Loc: Claverack, NY
 
tgreenhaw wrote:
LFingar - That's very impressive. DOF at f1.2 is about a foot and the EOS R autofocus nailed it.


Thanks. The R does very well, IMO. The auto-focus is more consistent then either of my previous DSLRs, a 7DII and a 5DIV. Facial tracking is pretty useless at a BB game. Too many faces. It can't decide where to focus. I find that single point works best. A higher frame rate would be nice at times but that's not a deal breaker in my world. I'll be shooting another game this Thursday. I recently purchased an RF 50mm f/1.2 L. I'll be taking that along with my 85 to see how it works close to the basket.
I just shoot for fun. I put all the usable shots on a disk and give them to the college athletic dept to use as they wish. They use them on their website, plus, the players love to get shots of themselves.

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Jan 14, 2020 00:48:25   #
Notorious T.O.D. Loc: Harrisburg, North Carolina
 
I might argue that the 40mm pancake lens is very sharp corner to corner and costs a fraction of the money... Just not good for sports...😎

tgreenhaw wrote:
I'll go out on a limb stating that the Canon 85mm 1.4 IS is ultrasharp wide open at the corners :-)

"Goodness, you can see every detail on every blade of grass in the camera-original © file, and this is shot at f/1.4, where almost nothing is in focus, and it's ultrasharp out to the corners." - Ken Rockwell.

It is pretty much as sharp at the corners wide open at f1.4 as the Zeiss Planar T 85mm f1.4 is at f2.8 (https://www.opticallimits.com/canon_eos_ff/1039-canon85f14is?start=1 vs. https://www.opticallimits.com/nikon_ff/591-zeisszf8514ff?start=1)

I have learned that the 85mm f1.4 is a specialized lens wide open. Yes, you do get higher available light shutter speeds but the DOF is so narrow that you really have to know when to use it.

For indoor sports, IMHO good low noise high ISO and solid IS (or maybe a monopod) with a zoom in the f2.8 to f4 range is a better tool for the prosumer indoor sports job.
I'll go out on a limb stating that the Canon 85mm ... (show quote)

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Jan 14, 2020 00:57:25   #
fstoprookie Loc: Central Valley of California
 
I've been shooting Basketball for sometime now (15 Years) - I shoot a 24-70mm f2.8 under the basket and still need to do some post processing because in some gyms the lighting is TERRIBLE. See if you can find a used f2.8 lens at ADORAMA or B & H and nothing bigger than a 70 for shooting under the basket. A 70-200mm f2.8 lens is REALLY HEAVY. I don't use my 70-200mm lens except for Soccer & Football. Good luck







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Jan 14, 2020 02:11:23   #
Thomas902 Loc: Washington DC
 
Bob epic pivotal moments... fabulous capture of dynamic motion...
Noticed you've used Nikon's flagship sports body the iconic D3
Looks like it served you well on your journey...

Thank you for sharing these inspirational images...
highly motivational...

all the best...

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Jan 14, 2020 02:20:30   #
fstoprookie Loc: Central Valley of California
 
It's a D5 my friend - Thanks for the feedback. - Have a great rest of the week

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Jan 14, 2020 08:59:15   #
jaymatt Loc: Alexandria, Indiana
 
Webbie62 wrote:
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, again in the late spring & early fall) sports. I am currently shooting High school basketball. I am beginning to realize that a EF 70-300mm 58ᶲ f/4-5.6 is not nearly enough to get good clean photos in manual mode. I can get some while using Sport Mode - but I am not really learning at this point besides blindly experimenting. I presume I will sell the above lens and get a similar with an f/2.8. I am looking for some suggestions while on a budget.
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, ag... (show quote)


You aren’t going to get much in manual mode when shooting any action sports.

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Jan 14, 2020 09:20:27   #
dsmeltz Loc: Philadelphia
 
jaymatt wrote:
You aren’t going to get much in manual mode when shooting any action sports.


Really?!?!? A lot of pro sports photographers would disagree.
You often (usually) need to control both aperture and shutter speed while relying on adjustments in post. In shutter priority aperture may be incorrectly changed resulting in missed focus. I often shoot at f4 to catch multiple players in a shot and do not want to open to 2.8. Having the camera decide to go to 2.8 because it thinks everything is too dark or close down to f8 or smaller because it is "too bright" can mean a ruined shot. ISO performance, card size and buffer speeds today allow a lot more play than 10 years ago.

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Jan 14, 2020 09:24:54   #
jaymatt Loc: Alexandria, Indiana
 
dsmeltz wrote:
Really?!?!? A lot of pro sports photographers would disagree.
You often (usually) need to control both aperture and shutter speed while relying on adjustments in post. In shutter priority aperture may be incorrectly changed resulting in missed focus. I often shoot at f4 to catch multiple players in a shot and do not want to open to 2.8. Having the camera decide to go to 2.8 because it thinks everything is too dark or close down to f8 or smaller because it is "too bright" can mean a ruined shot. ISO performance, card size and buffer speeds today allow a lot more play than 10 years ago.
Really?!?!? A lot of pro sports photographers wou... (show quote)


That might be true for pros, but most of us aren’t.

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Jan 14, 2020 09:26:43   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
jaymatt wrote:
You aren’t going to get much in manual mode when shooting any action sports.


I’m going to have to respectfully disagree with that (but maybe you don’t consider manual SS and aperture with auto ISO “manual”). I shoot manual plus auto ISO, and while my composition may be faulty, of the many, many thousands of indoor sports shots I’ve taken, I almost never have an incorrect exposure.

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