Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Indoor Sports Photography- Suggestions on a Budget
Page: <<prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 next>>
Jan 13, 2020 10:26:19   #
monroephoto
 
I hate to be a downer, and perhaps someone will disagree here, but you have chosen to shoot one of the most expensive areas of photography on the planet. Most camera bodies can do a wonderful job shooting regular portraits or flowers, etc. and the lens is the better investment to increase photo quality. Sports, however and especially low light sports, pretty much require fast glass AND a camera body that can ramp up the ISO setting without creating too much noise (grainy photographs). These bodies are expensive. I know of no solution except to perhaps get editing software that can reduce the noise of photos taken, post processing. I wish you the very best in your efforts.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 10:40:14   #
LFingar Loc: Claverack, NY
 
Webbie62 wrote:
Canon 6D


With the full frame 6D I would suggest the Canon EF 85mm f/1.8. It is an excellent lens. I had one that I used on my 6D and it gave outstanding results.
I currently shoot basketball at the local community college with a full frame EOS R and an RF 85mm f/1.2. That focal length works very well, especially when moving around the floor.
Crank up your ISO to get a fast shutter speed. I try to shoot at least at 1/1000 because of the speed of the players. The 6D can handle high ISO quite well.
For some reason, which makes no sense, I found that I got better results with the anti-flicker feature turned off. You may want to experiment.


(Download)

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 10:57:47   #
trinhqthuan Loc: gaithersburg
 
Webbie62 wrote:
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, again in the late spring & early fall) sports. I am currently shooting High school basketball. I am beginning to realize that a EF 70-300mm 58ᶲ f/4-5.6 is not nearly enough to get good clean photos in manual mode. I can get some while using Sport Mode - but I am not really learning at this point besides blindly experimenting. I presume I will sell the above lens and get a similar with an f/2.8. I am looking for some suggestions while on a budget.
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, ag... (show quote)


I use my 30 y.o. Nikkor AF D 85mm f/1.8 on 7 y.o D7100 in low light stadium at ISO 3200 (max) for sport.
I believe you can do the same with Canon. You will be surprise after heavy crop your portray lens can replace a 2.8 tele lens

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 11:03:19   #
dsmeltz Loc: Philadelphia
 
Webbie62 wrote:
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, again in the late spring & early fall) sports. I am currently shooting High school basketball. I am beginning to realize that a EF 70-300mm 58ᶲ f/4-5.6 is not nearly enough to get good clean photos in manual mode. I can get some while using Sport Mode - but I am not really learning at this point besides blindly experimenting. I presume I will sell the above lens and get a similar with an f/2.8. I am looking for some suggestions while on a budget.
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, ag... (show quote)


3 options that could work. Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4, a refurbished Canon 70-200 f/4L or a refurbished Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM should be find-able within your budget on a 6D. To go up to a 2.8 is out of your budget without purchasing a more questionable used lens. I would lean toward the 24-105 which will have many other uses.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 11:18:04   #
DALABB52
 
I have been using a 85mm 1.8 with great results, I normally shoot at 1/500 sec; iso 100-1200; f1.8 -2. Using a Nikon 800E have also used D7200 with same.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 11:50:22   #
Nicholas DeSciose
 
Why are you using manual mode? I can’t think of anything worse. Use aperture priority or program. With an ISO of about 1000. The advice of a 50 mm or 85 mm is good

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 12:16:38   #
dick ranez
 
From the first row of seats at a high school basketball game I've had good luck with the Canon 85mm f1.8, with 1200 ISO and the white balance set to flouresent (or however you spell it). The 85 works nicely for the half court I'm close too.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 12:53:01   #
LWW Loc: REDLEGS NATION
 
trinhqthuan wrote:
I use my 30 y.o. Nikkor AF D 85mm f/1.8 on 7 y.o D7100 in low light stadium at ISO 3200 (max) for sport.
I believe you can do the same with Canon. You will be surprise after heavy crop your portray lens can replace a 2.8 tele lens


Bingo.

I use an 85 1.8 AF non D on a D7200.

Even with a vertical grip it’s light enough to allow good mobility for a 63 year old young man.

The 80-200 AFD is a great baseball, soccer, rugby, volleyball, softball, football lens. Not so much so for indoor sports ... especially smaller venues.

Indoors I carry the 85 1.8AF, a 50 1.8 AF and a 35 1.8 AFS. Now and then also a ROKINON 16 2.0.

All are light enough to carry in most 4 pocket photo jackets.

Combined they are lighter than the 80-200 I think. At least extremely close, and in different pockets the weight is distributed better and feels lighter.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 12:54:27   #
speters Loc: Grangeville/Idaho
 
Webbie62 wrote:
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, again in the late spring & early fall) sports. I am currently shooting High school basketball. I am beginning to realize that a EF 70-300mm 58ᶲ f/4-5.6 is not nearly enough to get good clean photos in manual mode. I can get some while using Sport Mode - but I am not really learning at this point besides blindly experimenting. I presume I will sell the above lens and get a similar with an f/2.8. I am looking for some suggestions while on a budget.
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, ag... (show quote)


I have gotten some decent shots doing that with my 70-200/f2.8, but don't use it for that anymore, its just too slow!

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 12:56:56   #
LWW Loc: REDLEGS NATION
 
Nicholas DeSciose wrote:
Why are you using manual mode? I can’t think of anything worse. Use aperture priority or program. With an ISO of about 1000. The advice of a 50 mm or 85 mm is good


Gotta disagree.

Of the 3 sides of the triangle, if I have to let 1 fly it’s ISO. Put another way, I’d rather get the shot at ISO 12800 and some grain than to get a burry shot at 3200.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 13:23:12   #
LFingar Loc: Claverack, NY
 
LWW wrote:
Gotta disagree.

Of the 3 sides of the triangle, if I have to let 1 fly it’s ISO. Put another way, I’d rather get the shot at ISO 12800 and some grain than to get a burry shot at 3200.


I agree. I set aperture and speed and let the camera worry about ISO. I do go into the menu though and set 'High ISO Noise Reduction' to its max setting. Seems to help although I have never done a comparison without it.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 14:13:44   #
Photocraig
 
Even with my 15MP EOS 5D, I got acceptable indoor Middle School bad lighting Basketball shots with that lens. It requires careful exposure control, and higher than normal ISO. Meaning 1600-3200 ISO. Under exposure with an older crop sensor at high ISO makes the players look like they have the measles. BUT!!! Proper exposure allows elimination of most of the noise in PP. Underexposed frames are auto throwaways. However, my newer 24MP 77D body with the newer DIGIC processor allows 3200 ISO shots with ease.
The Depth of field issues are essential to good sports photography. This is NOT a Portrait session of an isolated player with perfect focus on the eyes. It is a context or environmental portrait (If you're shooting one player, like yer kid). BOTH versions of this lens have Image Stabilization. I've used both, the II version is better. BUT, with concentration on technique and scrupulous attention to exposure of the player(s)--not the whole Gym-- good images are to be had in all but the darkest barns our younger players use.

Suggestion: Get off All Scene modes. Take test readings and shots using the spot meter function of the players' faces then set manual exposure with at least a shutter speed or 1/250-500. Sacrificing a little motion blur for better exposure and DOF is, in my book, worth it. And a LITTLE motion blur shows the dynamics of the game. When the teams change offensive ends, re set the exposure. In those small gyms, lighting is not consistent. Check your screen, and monitor what you're getting. You should be able to produce acceptable images to share and view on screen using ISO's up to 3200. Anything over that and you're buying into a lot of PP.

I have also used a 90mm f2.8, from the baseline and corner stands. And 17-70 at 50-70 at f4 or so. Good results, BUT, shallow DOF makes these isolated "Environmental Portraits" in my mind. A good photo for Mom, but not a sports photo in the stricter sense. Chasing gear is as our British friends say, is a fool's errand.

My suggestion is for this season, concentrate on exposure control, positioning at the offensive ends where the players are facing the basket (and you're somewhere under it) or the corners. Having the action and motion moving toward you is a PLUS. Be sure to use AI Servo, I suggest slower burst mode for players through 13/14. Since you're on Manual Exposure which i recommend-- using shutter actuated focus will work for you. If you choose to go to Shutter Priority--a natural progression, especially out doors where lighting can change over time, moving clouds and with different angles, I suggest reading up on Back Button focus. Steve Perry, our OWN!!, has the best video with a Canon segment on how to.

Put the flash away! Players solution is an "OOOPS, sir, I'm sorry" after a barely sub sonic "errant" pass hits you and your camera square on.

Don't forget the Bench photos, the kids are really enthusiastic. And the parents watching make for the entire scene.

Have fun,
C

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 15:25:42   #
That1NJGuy
 
Webbie62 wrote:
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, again in the late spring & early fall) sports. I am currently shooting High school basketball. I am beginning to realize that a EF 70-300mm 58ᶲ f/4-5.6 is not nearly enough to get good clean photos in manual mode. I can get some while using Sport Mode - but I am not really learning at this point besides blindly experimenting. I presume I will sell the above lens and get a similar with an f/2.8. I am looking for some suggestions while on a budget.
I am looking to photograph indoor (and outdoor, ag... (show quote)


I'm in basically the same boat with a Nikon D7200 and similar lens. Here's what I've found from my experience. I do shoot in sports mode. But I have to do minor post edit, mostly for white balance or cropping for best content. My biggest issue is I find shots out of the frame due to the movement of the action. I started 2 yrs ago with a total budget of $1000. I am fortunate to get on the floor at the end of the court. I stay out of the refs way as much as possible. I have also shot hockey too and always have to post edit for white balance or bring exposure up. I'm finding very quickly, this lens is not the best tool for the job. A 2.8 is a must. Luckily in basketball you can be on the short end of the lens (70ish mm) and be ok. But once you get outside for bigger fields, you will need a longer reach. Especially if you do night games.

I've attached a one of my photos to see what you can get.


(Download)

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 15:37:22   #
PHRubin Loc: Nashville TN USA
 
Webbie62 wrote:
... I can get some while using Sport Mode - but I am not really learning at this point besides blindly experimenting...

WELCOME TO UHH

1st - learn about the exposure triangle. There are 3 settings that affect exposure (ISO, Aperture (F stop), shutter speed). Each has an additional affect.

2nd - learn how to examine the EXIF data (data showing camera settings) to see what settings were used in Sport on the photos that were OK. Then try those settings in Manual.

3rd - experiment varying each of the 3 and see the effects other than proper exposure.

This should help you learn the impact of the 3 settings.

| Reply
Jan 13, 2020 15:40:39   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
Nicholas DeSciose wrote:
Why are you using manual mode? I can’t think of anything worse. Use aperture priority or program. With an ISO of about 1000. The advice of a 50 mm or 85 mm is good


He’s shooting sports, and the highest priority is freezing the motion, so either shutter priority or better yet, manual with auto ISO is the mode of choice. You pick the minimum shutter speed to freeze the motion and an aperture that provides enough DOF without too high an ISO under worst case, and then, let the auto ISO take care of varying light conditions. Simple, especially with the OP’s FF 6D which can easily handle ISO 12,800 with acceptable noise.

| Reply
Page: <<prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 next>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2020 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.