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New Mirrorless Direction from Nikon and Conon
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Jul 28, 2018 08:20:34   #
O2Ra
 
Exactly spot on , on everything. Great advice and insight .

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 08:37:46   #
O2Ra
 
BebuLamar wrote:
Not the body and the lens but rather the lens and the adapter. The motor must be in the adapter as the body won't have any mechanical coupling.


Ooooo, don’t like the fact it has the mirror in it and the fact the AF is on it. With the Phase detection on the mirror and not on the sensor it might not af as well. And it will definitely make the phase detect area smaller. That type of mirror also takes away a lot of light and will take away available light waves. This will lead to an image with less micro contrast.
It may be designed in this manner to avoid patient infringement to other manufacturers not sure. Or maybe it just works better with the Nikon system.
We will find out if this system even gets used. I believe the finished product doesn’t have to have everything in the proposed patient. But putting everything in the patient allows for them to keep people from using this type system. Keeping other manufacturers from making a soild system to compete with Nikons adapter.
All guesses on my part .

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 08:46:30   #
johnst1001a (a regular here)
 
To me, it boils down to how much are you willing to pay for image quality. I took a bunch of pictures with a new Canon 5DMK4. I have L-lenses, and a couple of Sigma's. Under say good lighting conditions, the pictures were outstanding, very clear, no noise visible at ISO 800, and correctable at ISO 1600. Colors were fine after post-processing RAW files. Typically I crop my pictures in post to make sure the image I capture is appropriately positioned on the frame, but usually not more than half the original size. I could easily spend more money on a higher resolution camera, like the 5DSR or even the 850, and perhaps get a notch up in picture quality, particularly for pictures cropped more. I didn't buy the 850 as that would have resulted in new lenses. I didn't buy the 5DSR either for limits on low light performance (ISO limited). I could have looked at Sony too, but then in 5 years something new would come out, and I would want that too. Then there is the Hasselblad medium format Xd1. It never stops, there is always something better. So, for me Canon is my choice for at least 5 years. I cannot justify replacing $20,000 in lenses with a whole new set. No, I didn't buy all those lenses, I inherited many of them, only bought 3.

Which brings up another point, lenses. The debate is the same here, you can always find a lens that is a bit better, but is it that much better than spending $2000? Or could I go with Sigma, Tamron or other? Again, it depends on your picture quality needs, and importantly your skills. It might be that you can get a better quality image far cheaper by improving your photography skills and attention to detail. For instance, I had changed a setting on my camera for one type of shot, and forgot to change it, only to find I was getting very dark pictures. I took quite a few pictures with the wrong setting, as I don't review each shot. Details, details. Fortunately I was able to correct the images in Post.

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 08:58:45   #
BebuLamar (a regular here)
 
O2Ra wrote:
Ooooo, don’t like the fact it has the mirror in it and the fact the AF is on it. With the Phase detection on the mirror and not on the sensor it might not af as well. And it will definitely make the phase detect area smaller. That type of mirror also takes away a lot of light and will take away available light waves. This will lead to an image with less micro contrast.
It may be designed in this manner to avoid patient infringement to other manufacturers not sure. Or maybe it just works better with the Nikon system.
We will find out if this system even gets used. I believe the finished product doesn’t have to have everything in the proposed patient. But putting everything in the patient allows for them to keep people from using this type system. Keeping other manufacturers from making a soild system to compete with Nikons adapter.
All guesses on my part .
Ooooo, don’t like the fact it has the mirror in it... (show quote)


I don't know that the adapter would have the mirror in it or not. But I think the semi transparent mirror is a bad idea any way even way back to the Canon Pellix or some of those high frame rate film cameras from Nikon and Canon to the current Sony SLT.

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 09:21:13   #
alfeng
 
NJose wrote:
This week in a B&H email there was an article/ad about Nikon's new mirrolress DSLR coming soon (see link below). There are rumors about Canon also coming out with their own as well. That's great that they are finally getting into the game. I would expect that these two giant's will knock the socks of Sony with all of years of experience.

But, what was real interesting to me was the confirmation that the Nikon mirrorless will feature a brand-new mount (no official word from Canon yet), one that Nikon claims opens the door for groundbreaking optical opportunities. Now, bringing it home, that puts me in a bind, because I was looking to purchase the Canon 100-400 IS II L lens this year and a new camera in 2019 or early 2020. There is talk about an adapter, but who know how that will work out. My budget is limited and I hate to spend money into a dying line.

Your thoughts on continuing to invest in the current line of DSLR?

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/photography/news/nikons-exciting-entry-into-full-frame-mirrorless?utm_medium=Email%201686209&utm_campaign=Newsletter&utm_source=Newsletter%20180725&utm_content=Retail&utm_term=nikons-exciting-entry-into-full-frame-mirrorless&encEmail=964B8F39F761D7DFF6FF726CA3679A786B3059AF55EC711E95DC83FAE9BD5BF9
This week in a B&H email there was an article/... (show quote)

THIS may-or-may-not be obvious (or, it could be suggested by some to be wrong!?!), but curved sensor would theoretically be better which would require slightly less optical correction OR (in other words) allow for optical designs whose "edges" are almost as sharp as the central portion of the created image ...

The NET RESULT (in theory) is potentially smaller lenses with comparable-or-better image quality from-edge-to-edge.

I reckon that the new Nikon may have a slightly curved sensor & the new lenses are designed to take advantage of it.

... Sigma et al. will need to re-formulate their lens designs which may temporarily diminish their market share; so, from a bean counter point of view, THAT is why Nikon and/or Canon (and, anyone else) MIGHT design a camera body with a curved sensor.

AFAIK, the price on the mirrorless Nikon body has been suggested to be in the $4000 range ...

Lens prices will be comparably expensive if you don't want to use an F-or-whatever-to-Z lens mount adapter.

So, the SIZE & WEIGHT of your current and future camera bodies & lenses PLUS your wallet should possibly be the factors which influence your future camera purchases ...

You probably won't save money in the near future by waiting for Nikon's FF mirrorless camera & lenses OR whatever Canon ends up offering in THAT arena; but, waiting for another six months or a year often doesn't hurt.

If you want a lighter OR less expensive configuration than you are currently using, then go with an m4/3 setup OR any other "crop sensor" camera system.





| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 09:27:10   #
BebuLamar (a regular here)
 
alfeng wrote:
THIS may-or-may-not be obvious (or, it could be suggested by some to be wrong!?!), but curved sensor would theoretically be better which would require slightly less optical correction OR (in other words) allow for optical designs whose "edges" are almost as sharp as the central portion of the created image ...

The NET RESULT (in theory) is potentially smaller lenses with comparable-or-better image quality from-edge-to-edge.

I reckon that the new Nikon may have a slightly curved sensor & the new lenses are designed to take advantage of it.

... Sigma et al. will need to re-formulate their lens designs which may temporarily diminish their market share; so, from a bean counter point of view, THAT is why Nikon and/or Canon (and, anyone else) MIGHT design a camera body with a curved sensor.

AFAIK, the price on the mirrorless Nikon body has been suggested to be in the $4000 range ...

Lens prices will be comparably expensive if you don't want to use an F-or-whatever-to-Z lens mount adapter.

So, the SIZE & WEIGHT of your current and future camera bodies & lenses PLUS your wallet should possibly be the factors which influence your future camera purchases ...

You probably won't save money in the near future by waiting for Nikon's FF mirrorless camera & lenses OR whatever Canon ends up offering in THAT arena; but, waiting for another six months or a year often doesn't hurt.

If you want a lighter OR less expensive configuration than you are currently using, then go with an m4/3 setup OR any other "crop sensor" camera system.




THIS may-or-may-not be obvious ( color=red or, it ... (show quote)


We have to wait until Aug 23 but I am sure the new Nikon doesn't have the curved sensor.

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 09:32:18   #
dcampbell52
 
NJose wrote:
This week in a B&H email there was an article/ad about Nikon's new mirrolress DSLR coming soon (see link below). There are rumors about Canon also coming out with their own as well. That's great that they are finally getting into the game. I would expect that these two giant's will knock the socks of Sony with all of years of experience.

But, what was real interesting to me was the confirmation that the Nikon mirrorless will feature a brand-new mount (no official word from Canon yet), one that Nikon claims opens the door for groundbreaking optical opportunities. Now, bringing it home, that puts me in a bind, because I was looking to purchase the Canon 100-400 IS II L lens this year and a new camera in 2019 or early 2020. There is talk about an adapter, but who know how that will work out. My budget is limited and I hate to spend money into a dying line.

Your thoughts on continuing to invest in the current line of DSLR?

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/photography/news/nikons-exciting-entry-into-full-frame-mirrorless?utm_medium=Email%201686209&utm_campaign=Newsletter&utm_source=Newsletter%20180725&utm_content=Retail&utm_term=nikons-exciting-entry-into-full-frame-mirrorless&encEmail=964B8F39F761D7DFF6FF726CA3679A786B3059AF55EC711E95DC83FAE9BD5BF9
This week in a B&H email there was an article/... (show quote)

First, I doubt that Nikon is going to abandon their mirrored cameras (anytime soon) for mirrorless. What they ARE doing is meeting an area where consumers are pushing them. Down the road, will mirrorless replace mirrored cameras? Who knows.. look at film cameras vs digital and how long it took for digital to ALMOST completely replace film. While mirrorless is an important development and an area of the market that can't and shouldn't be ignored, it does have certain disadvantages too. The main disadvantage for me is that I do alot (living in Florida) of work in bright sunshine which makes the rear screen display virtually useless. Since there is no "view finder" on the mirrorless camera, that is an issue. (yes I know that a few offer a second screen inside a veiwfinder but, again, there are limitations. Also, mirrorless cameras (at this time) are not as good for low light work. In addition, there is not the wide assortment of lenses and certainly not the plethera of "professional grade glass" that Nikon, Tamron, Sigma and other manufaturers have for DSLR. And yes, I sure that many of these same issues were said about DSLR back when film was King. However, DSLR was able to change the landscape over film because, A: your image is digital so you can see the results "right now" vs waiting for processing and hoping that the processor (you or the plant) doesn't mess up the film. B: most of the film lenses fit the DSLR cameras. C: Memory cards could and can be reused vs film's one and done on rolls. Would you rather spend $5 per roll (roughly) for 35mm film that is used once then pay for developing (either to a plant or for chemicals to do your self), D: convert the analog film to digital for emailing, posting online or whatever. Pay for printing (this is a price for both film and digital but film enlarging tends to cost more). Yes, my first camera memory card was for an Agfa digital camera and it was NOT a DSLR but more of a point and shoot and the card was a 4k card. Now I have 32 gb cards that cost me about what that 4k card cost and I have 64 gb cards in addition.. also my camera can hold 2 sd cards at a time and I can make card 1 for photos and card 2 for video if I want... My point is that (right now), mirrorless has a lot of maturing to do before it will challenge DSLR... that is not to say that it won't but more than likely Nikon (being Nikon) will find a way to make their large assortment of DSLR lenses work on their mirrorless. If not.. they may settle for having another line (similar to the "Nikon1" which may be more likely to be replaced than the DSLR). and the Nikon point and shoots. I'm 66 and it's taken DSLR about 15-20 years to completely replace film. My guess is that it MAY take a mirrorless system 10-15 years to replace DSLR.. However, in order for DSLR to replace film, several things had to happen. (better sensors to give the ability for low light for good ISO range since you can't change to a faster or slower film) better larger and less expensive memory cards (virtually killed the film industry) interchangable lenses (not only within a model but the ability to use old film lenses too), plus and most important, a change in camera users mind set (I'm not about to replace my investment in cameras and lenses based on a fad. I want to see it develop and give me real reasons to move before I'm selling off, getting rid of or replacing my current inventory). Will it happen? maybe, but maybe there will be something else that comes along that is the newer better option. Lots of people thought that the Nikon 1 was going to replace the DX cameras (much less FX) but it didn't happen.. in fact Nikon 1 is barely a bridge between point and shoot and DX. People tend to forget that Nikon, and to a lesser degree, Canon have alot more business interests than JUST cameras. Nikon is optics (camera lenses, binoculars, rifle scopes, telescopes, medical/research optics satalite optics, not to mention (especially with Canon) copiers, and other office / general products. Mirrorless is (at this time) another niche that keeps them from looking like they aren't interested. But, they also have to sell enough to cover their research/development costs in addition to manufacturing. Yes, Mirrorless has the potential to be important... but so did flying cars, and any number of other "important" developments.. how about the 8mm Minox camera? That certainly took over photography didnt it?

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 09:38:15   #
BebuLamar (a regular here)
 
dcampbell52 wrote:
First, I doubt that Nikon is going to abandon their mirrored cameras (anytime soon) for mirrorless. What they ARE doing is meeting an area where consumers are pushing them. Down the road, will mirrorless replace mirrored cameras? Who knows.. look at film cameras vs digital and how long it took for digital to ALMOST completely replace film. While mirrorless is an important development and an area of the market that can't and shouldn't be ignored, it does have certain disadvantages too. The main disadvantage for me is that I do alot (living in Florida) of work in bright sunshine which makes the rear screen display virtually useless. Since there is no "view finder" on the mirrorless camera, that is an issue. (yes I know that a few offer a second screen inside a veiwfinder but, again, there are limitations. Also, mirrorless cameras (at this time) are not as good for low light work. In addition, there is not the wide assortment of lenses and certainly not the plethera of "professional grade glass" that Nikon, Tamron, Sigma and other manufaturers have for DSLR. And yes, I sure that many of these same issues were said about DSLR back when film was King. However, DSLR was able to change the landscape over film because, A: your image is digital so you can see the results "right now" vs waiting for processing and hoping that the processor (you or the plant) doesn't mess up the film. B: most of the film lenses fit the DSLR cameras. C: Memory cards could and can be reused vs film's one and done on rolls. Would you rather spend $5 per roll (roughly) for 35mm film that is used once then pay for developing (either to a plant or for chemicals to do your self), D: convert the analog film to digital for emailing, posting online or whatever. Pay for printing (this is a price for both film and digital but film enlarging tends to cost more). Yes, my first camera memory card was for an Agfa digital camera and it was NOT a DSLR but more of a point and shoot and the card was a 4k card. Now I have 32 gb cards that cost me about what that 4k card cost and I have 64 gb cards in addition.. also my camera can hold 2 sd cards at a time and I can make card 1 for photos and card 2 for video if I want... My point is that (right now), mirrorless has a lot of maturing to do before it will challenge DSLR... that is not to say that it won't but more than likely Nikon (being Nikon) will find a way to make their large assortment of DSLR lenses work on their mirrorless. If not.. they may settle for having another line (similar to the "Nikon1" which may be more likely to be replaced than the DSLR). and the Nikon point and shoots. I'm 66 and it's taken DSLR about 15-20 years to completely replace film. My guess is that it MAY take a mirrorless system 10-15 years to replace DSLR.. However, in order for DSLR to replace film, several things had to happen. (better sensors to give the ability for low light for good ISO range since you can't change to a faster or slower film) better larger and less expensive memory cards (virtually killed the film industry) interchangable lenses (not only within a model but the ability to use old film lenses too), plus and most important, a change in camera users mind set (I'm not about to replace my investment in cameras and lenses based on a fad. I want to see it develop and give me real reasons to move before I'm selling off, getting rid of or replacing my current inventory). Will it happen? maybe, but maybe there will be something else that comes along that is the newer better option. Lots of people thought that the Nikon 1 was going to replace the DX cameras (much less FX) but it didn't happen.. in fact Nikon 1 is barely a bridge between point and shoot and DX. People tend to forget that Nikon, and to a lesser degree, Canon have alot more business interests than JUST cameras. Nikon is optics (camera lenses, binoculars, rifle scopes, telescopes, medical/research optics satalite optics, not to mention (especially with Canon) copiers, and other office / general products. Mirrorless is (at this time) another niche that keeps them from looking like they aren't interested. But, they also have to sell enough to cover their research/development costs in addition to manufacturing. Yes, Mirrorless has the potential to be important... but so did flying cars, and any number of other "important" developments.. how about the 8mm Minox camera? That certainly took over photography didnt it?
First, I doubt that Nikon is going to abandon thei... (show quote)


If like you said it would take mirrorless 10 to 15 years to replace the DSLR then the time is NOW because the interchangable lens mirrorless camera was introduced in 2010 if I am not mistaken.

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 09:53:55   #
chrisg-optical
 
NJose wrote:
This week in a B&H email there was an article/ad about Nikon's new mirrolress DSLR coming soon (see link below). There are rumors about Canon also coming out with their own as well. That's great that they are finally getting into the game. I would expect that these two giant's will knock the socks of Sony with all of years of experience.

But, what was real interesting to me was the confirmation that the Nikon mirrorless will feature a brand-new mount (no official word from Canon yet), one that Nikon claims opens the door for groundbreaking optical opportunities. Now, bringing it home, that puts me in a bind, because I was looking to purchase the Canon 100-400 IS II L lens this year and a new camera in 2019 or early 2020. There is talk about an adapter, but who know how that will work out. My budget is limited and I hate to spend money into a dying line.

Your thoughts on continuing to invest in the current line of DSLR?

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/photography/news/nikons-exciting-entry-into-full-frame-mirrorless?utm_medium=Email%201686209&utm_campaign=Newsletter&utm_source=Newsletter%20180725&utm_content=Retail&utm_term=nikons-exciting-entry-into-full-frame-mirrorless&encEmail=964B8F39F761D7DFF6FF726CA3679A786B3059AF55EC711E95DC83FAE9BD5BF9
This week in a B&H email there was an article/... (show quote)


I will play wait and see as a Nikon user but won't stop buying lenses i need or want in the meantime. For Canon i am sure they will do the same, with a mount adapter, otherwise they will alienate their existing customer base. Hopefully both did their homework to exploit features lacking in Sony the current king of the FF mirrorless mountain. We will see in about a month. Early models will be expensive, not to mention the mount adapter as a required accessory for existing users. Will the new Z mount lenses offer new features or benefits?

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 10:00:10   #
tomad
 
Yes, I saw Nikon's press release yesterday. Their mirrorless camera will be released next month, so not just a rumor. Release date is August 23rd.

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 10:00:53   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
dcampbell52 wrote:
First, I doubt that Nikon is going to abandon their mirrored cameras (anytime soon) for mirrorless. What they ARE doing is meeting an area where consumers are pushing them. Down the road, will mirrorless replace mirrored cameras? Who knows.. look at film cameras vs digital and how long it took for digital to ALMOST completely replace film. While mirrorless is an important development and an area of the market that can't and shouldn't be ignored, it does have certain disadvantages too. The main disadvantage for me is that I do alot (living in Florida) of work in bright sunshine which makes the rear screen display virtually useless. Since there is no "view finder" on the mirrorless camera, that is an issue. (yes I know that a few offer a second screen inside a veiwfinder but, again, there are limitations. Also, mirrorless cameras (at this time) are not as good for low light work. In addition, there is not the wide assortment of lenses and certainly not the plethera of "professional grade glass" that Nikon, Tamron, Sigma and other manufaturers have for DSLR. And yes, I sure that many of these same issues were said about DSLR back when film was King. However, DSLR was able to change the landscape over film because, A: your image is digital so you can see the results "right now" vs waiting for processing and hoping that the processor (you or the plant) doesn't mess up the film. B: most of the film lenses fit the DSLR cameras. C: Memory cards could and can be reused vs film's one and done on rolls. Would you rather spend $5 per roll (roughly) for 35mm film that is used once then pay for developing (either to a plant or for chemicals to do your self), D: convert the analog film to digital for emailing, posting online or whatever. Pay for printing (this is a price for both film and digital but film enlarging tends to cost more). Yes, my first camera memory card was for an Agfa digital camera and it was NOT a DSLR but more of a point and shoot and the card was a 4k card. Now I have 32 gb cards that cost me about what that 4k card cost and I have 64 gb cards in addition.. also my camera can hold 2 sd cards at a time and I can make card 1 for photos and card 2 for video if I want... My point is that (right now), mirrorless has a lot of maturing to do before it will challenge DSLR... that is not to say that it won't but more than likely Nikon (being Nikon) will find a way to make their large assortment of DSLR lenses work on their mirrorless. If not.. they may settle for having another line (similar to the "Nikon1" which may be more likely to be replaced than the DSLR). and the Nikon point and shoots. I'm 66 and it's taken DSLR about 15-20 years to completely replace film. My guess is that it MAY take a mirrorless system 10-15 years to replace DSLR.. However, in order for DSLR to replace film, several things had to happen. (better sensors to give the ability for low light for good ISO range since you can't change to a faster or slower film) better larger and less expensive memory cards (virtually killed the film industry) interchangable lenses (not only within a model but the ability to use old film lenses too), plus and most important, a change in camera users mind set (I'm not about to replace my investment in cameras and lenses based on a fad. I want to see it develop and give me real reasons to move before I'm selling off, getting rid of or replacing my current inventory). Will it happen? maybe, but maybe there will be something else that comes along that is the newer better option. Lots of people thought that the Nikon 1 was going to replace the DX cameras (much less FX) but it didn't happen.. in fact Nikon 1 is barely a bridge between point and shoot and DX. People tend to forget that Nikon, and to a lesser degree, Canon have alot more business interests than JUST cameras. Nikon is optics (camera lenses, binoculars, rifle scopes, telescopes, medical/research optics satalite optics, not to mention (especially with Canon) copiers, and other office / general products. Mirrorless is (at this time) another niche that keeps them from looking like they aren't interested. But, they also have to sell enough to cover their research/development costs in addition to manufacturing. Yes, Mirrorless has the potential to be important... but so did flying cars, and any number of other "important" developments.. how about the 8mm Minox camera? That certainly took over photography didnt it?
First, I doubt that Nikon is going to abandon thei... (show quote)


"While mirrorless is an important development and an area of the market that can't and shouldn't be ignored, it does have certain disadvantages too. The main disadvantage for me is that I do alot (living in Florida) of work in bright sunshine which makes the rear screen display virtually useless. Since there is no "view finder" on the mirrorless camera, that is an issue.:
R, The Canon M5 has a viewfinder that works just like your DSLR and is just fine in the bright sun. I believe the Sony, Olympus and Panasonic are the same. Perhaps you are thinking of the little PS cameras.

"Also, mirrorless cameras (at this time) are not as good for low light work.":
R, Sony I thought was the low light king. It is mirrorless.

"In addition, there is not the wide assortment of lenses and certainly not the plethera of "professional grade glass":
Canon M cameras work perfectly fine with no loss of function with all Canon L lenses ever made since 1988 100%. Also you can include all EF, EFs and M lenses made since 1988 are 100% compatible with no loss of features on the Canon mirrorless cameras.

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 10:18:14   #
gwilliams6
 
Why Sony is killing it right now and Nikon and Canon are scrambling to catch up. A GOOD EXPLAINATION OF MIRRORLESS ADVANTAGES

http://sonyaddict.com/2018/07/28/the-art-of-photography-why-sony-is-absolutely-killing-it-right-now/

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 10:23:50   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
I was unaware that weight was a photographic characteristic of any camera. It would seem that the accuracy of the aperture to f-stop indication and shutter speed to shutter speed indication would be the qualities in which I'd be interested. For cameras with built-in meters, the ISO setting and the accuracy of the indicated exposure would be an important consideration, as well. But then, I use cameras that weigh 10 pounds, give or take. The entire case, lenses and film weigh probably 20 pounds. I also carry them some distances, as well. The weight was not a consideration in any camera I've purchased.
--Bob
knessr wrote:
Mainly weight and physical size. My Canon M6 mirrorless with a 55mm to 200 mm lens weighs in at 1 1/2 pounds whereas my 60D and 70mm to 200mm comes in at 4 1/2 pounds. While 3 pounds doesn't sound like much, it takes it toll carrying around the extra weight day in and day out. And I go the adapter too so if I want to use one of my DSLR lens, I can.

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 10:33:47   #
gwilliams6
 
Architect1776 wrote:
"While mirrorless is an important development and an area of the market that can't and shouldn't be ignored, it does have certain disadvantages too. The main disadvantage for me is that I do alot (living in Florida) of work in bright sunshine which makes the rear screen display virtually useless. Since there is no "view finder" on the mirrorless camera, that is an issue.:
R, The Canon M5 has a viewfinder that works just like your DSLR and is just fine in the bright sun. I believe the Sony, Olympus and Panasonic are the same. Perhaps you are thinking of the little PS cameras.

"Also, mirrorless cameras (at this time) are not as good for low light work.":
R, Sony I thought was the low light king. It is mirrorless.

"In addition, there is not the wide assortment of lenses and certainly not the plethera of "professional grade glass":
Canon M cameras work perfectly fine with no loss of function with all Canon L lenses ever made since 1988 100%. Also you can include all EF, EFs and M lenses made since 1988 are 100% compatible with no loss of features on the Canon mirrorless cameras.
"While mirrorless is an important development... (show quote)


Modern mirrorless have a sunlight setting allowing you to view the rear screen in brightest sunlight, no problem. I have this on both my Sony A7RIII and A7III. And of course bright sunlight doesn't affect your EVF at all. They are the low light kings, bar none. And between Sony, Sigma, Tamron, Laowa, Maike, Samyang/Rokinon and others there are over 100 quality and professional grade E-mount lenses and more coming.

| Reply
Jul 28, 2018 10:37:01   #
gwilliams6
 
traderjohn wrote:
If as you say Sony will sell image sensors to Nikon, why?? What would the loss of sensor revenue be in relation to the loss of Sony camera/lens sales for those needing a new camera fix? A new anything that will make them feel whole.


Sony has been making and selling sensors to Nikon for years for many of their models, and also used to sell them to Canon (which now makes their own). Sony has always been the leader in sensor tech and manufacturing and still makes their own for their own cameras. Sony makes most of the image sensors for your cellphones also. Why wouldn't they keep all their clients.

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