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Photographically Stopping A bullet
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Aug 1, 2021 20:09:18   #
chrisg-optical Loc: New York, NY
 
therwol wrote:
A 9mm bullet travels at around 1200 feet per second. With a flash duration of 1/41,000 second, the bullet will travel about .3 feet, or about 3.6 inches during the flash and will look like a long blur on a photograph. You do need a flash duration of about a millionth of a second to stop a bullet cold in a photograph. This is beyond the capability of any consumer grade flash equipment. As for slowing a bullet down with a few sheets of paper, I doubt if something like that would slow down a fast moving bullet to any significant degree.
A 9mm bullet travels at around 1200 feet per secon... (show quote)


You can experiment with different materials and also the thickness. There will be some slowdown with enough material and the right kind of material. If five sheets don't work try 10, 15, 20, etc. Softer materials might work better. Materials to try - cardboard, leather, thick cloth, RUBBER.

The other technique to slow down bullets might be curved piping - this can be dangerous though...I recently watched a video on YT where someone experimented with different bends of curved piping (including the U-turn suicide special). Surprisingly the bullet followed the path of the pipe in most cases. The piping needs to be fairly thick (steel) otherwise it will just blow out the side. I would not recommend the pipe technique...you can ask the last guy who used the pistol below....oh well, you can't he's not around anymore...



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Aug 1, 2021 20:54:39   #
quixdraw Loc: American Free States -- Montana
 
chrisg-optical wrote:
You can experiment with different materials and also the thickness. There will be some slowdown with enough material and the right kind of material. If five sheets don't work try 10, 15, 20, etc. Softer materials might work better. Materials to try - cardboard, leather, thick cloth, RUBBER.

The other technique to slow down bullets might be curved piping - this can be dangerous though...I recently watched a video on YT where someone experimented with different bends of curved piping (including the U-turn suicide special). Surprisingly the bullet followed the path of the pipe in most cases. The piping needs to be fairly thick (steel) otherwise it will just blow out the side. I would not recommend the pipe technique...you can ask the last guy who used the pistol below....oh well, you can't he's not around anymore...
You can experiment with different materials and al... (show quote)


They were already using curved barrel extensions in WWII, MP 44 to shoot around corners for urban fighting. The data is out there. Soft loads are a better path.

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Aug 1, 2021 21:13:39   #
therwol Loc: USA
 
quixdraw wrote:
The OP could buy a .38, find a local Hand loader and pay for some soft target loads for a few hundred dollars vs. a young fortune for a 1 millionth speed flash even if one could be found. The old rule is that if a shot feels or sounds strange, open the action and check the barrel! Having some experience with CB caps, your incident surprises me. The pressures needed to bulge a barrel shouldn't be there.


This happened around 40 years ago, and I did shoot both CB caps and full loads, and perhaps I'm confused about the exact sequence of events, but the end result was from a bullet not exiting the barrel. It's a good thing it was only a .22.

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Aug 1, 2021 22:25:00   #
chrisg-optical Loc: New York, NY
 
Buckeye73 wrote:
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it passed through an apple but my set up is not fast enough. I used a Miops Trigger set to the sound mode which would set off the flash set at 128 power. The camera was on bulb mode programed for 3 seconds. I used a 30 inch cubed box that I lined with black foam board to get a dark environment. I could get decent photos of the muzzle flash and the apple exploding but nothing of the bullet. The speed of the flash is based on the shortest flash duration. The flash I used was a Nikon SB800 which gives a flash duration of 1/41,000
of a second. Further research indicated it would take a flash duration of 1 millionth of a second to totally stop a bullet.
How can this be done economically?
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it pa... (show quote)


Just spotted this - check it out >>

https://www.technocrazed.com/vela-one-worlds-fastest-and-cost-effective-flash-for-slow-motion-photography

AND

https://www.vela.io/

A bit over $1400 USD is in the realm of affordable.

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Aug 2, 2021 02:15:29   #
twowindsbear
 
hcmcdole wrote:
I think you may be off by a factor of ten? It should be 0.029 feet or 0.36 inches.


that little bit of distance doesn't make the difference. those calculations regarding 1/41,000 vs 1/millionth sec is off by a factor of 10.

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Aug 2, 2021 05:23:34   #
moomoo951
 
ok what you need is a strobe light a very fast strobe light oh and forget the flash and set the camera to take contious pictures or movie mode

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Aug 2, 2021 05:33:22   #
Manglesphoto Loc: 70 miles south of St.Louis
 
therwol wrote:
If you hand load to a lower velocity and you're using a semi-automatic gun, the mechanism may not actuate and/or the casing may not fully eject and jam the gun. And who is going to do this?

I think that the bullet velocity will still be a problem out to at least a couple of hundred yards, and try to hit something with a handgun at that distance.


Your gun will not "jam" it will fail to eject!!! if you load directly into the chamber by hand with an empty magazine .
Looking at your images I believe you need a bit more ambient light, and maybe not.
As someone said study Dr. Edgerton's method!!!

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Aug 2, 2021 07:20:10   #
Vincejr
 
I think you need some white background to be able to see the bullet better. And a different trigger.

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Aug 2, 2021 07:30:23   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
A commendable effort, to say the least. Much more expensive equipment will probably be needed to be successful.
--Bob
Buckeye73 wrote:
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it passed through an apple but my set up is not fast enough. I used a Miops Trigger set to the sound mode which would set off the flash set at 128 power. The camera was on bulb mode programed for 3 seconds. I used a 30 inch cubed box that I lined with black foam board to get a dark environment. I could get decent photos of the muzzle flash and the apple exploding but nothing of the bullet. The speed of the flash is based on the shortest flash duration. The flash I used was a Nikon SB800 which gives a flash duration of 1/41,000
of a second. Further research indicated it would take a flash duration of 1 millionth of a second to totally stop a bullet.
How can this be done economically?
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it pa... (show quote)

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Aug 2, 2021 07:34:23   #
BebuLamar
 
therwol wrote:
I stand corrected, but it still isn't good enough for a sharp image.


But you should see the bullet. I think the OP needs to adjust the timing. I think in the apple shot the bullet has gone out of frame before the flash fired.

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Aug 2, 2021 08:48:51   #
killroy
 
Muzzleloader gun using blackpowder. One could load a very low charge. I once got a bullet to exit the barrel using no powder, just a 209 primer.

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Aug 2, 2021 09:17:47   #
sr71 Loc: In Col. Juan Seguin Land
 
therwol wrote:
If you hand load to a lower velocity and you're using a semi-automatic gun, the mechanism may not actuate and/or the casing may not fully eject and jam the gun. And who is going to do this?

I think that the bullet velocity will still be a problem out to at least a couple of hundred yards, and try to hit something with a handgun at that distance.


Hitting something at 200 is no problem. Check out this video of Jerry Miculek popping a ballon at 1000 meters. I'm not saying it's easy but can be done.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJ3XwizTqDw

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Aug 2, 2021 09:25:02   #
Scruples Loc: Brooklyn, New York
 
Buckeye73 wrote:
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it passed through an apple but my set up is not fast enough. I used a Miops Trigger set to the sound mode which would set off the flash set at 128 power. The camera was on bulb mode programed for 3 seconds. I used a 30 inch cubed box that I lined with black foam board to get a dark environment. I could get decent photos of the muzzle flash and the apple exploding but nothing of the bullet. The speed of the flash is based on the shortest flash duration. The flash I used was a Nikon SB800 which gives a flash duration of 1/41,000
of a second. Further research indicated it would take a flash duration of 1 millionth of a second to totally stop a bullet.
How can this be done economically?
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it pa... (show quote)


Mathematically, you are correct because the physics cannot be manipulated that well with slower results. I have never used a Miops camera Trigger. I have used a Pluto Trigger with good results. We need a good side by side comparison because there are several out there.

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Aug 2, 2021 10:05:41   #
SuperflyTNT Loc: Manassas VA
 
chrisg-optical wrote:
Just spotted this - check it out >>

https://www.technocrazed.com/vela-one-worlds-fastest-and-cost-effective-flash-for-slow-motion-photography

AND

https://www.vela.io/

Affordable if you’re planning on using it for more than one shot.
A bit over $1400 USD is in the realm of affordable.

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Aug 2, 2021 10:23:16   #
BebuLamar
 
quixdraw wrote:
Dr. Harold Edgerton - https://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2009/08/19/edgerton-rapatronic/
Lots of info, as to affordable, probably not!


I thought it's the photographer that made the picture not the gear.

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