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Photographically Stopping A bullet
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Aug 4, 2021 16:29:35   #
JBRIII
 
Shutterbugger2 wrote:
Another way to make brief flashes is a chemical flash. Again, from memory, you would mix powdered aluminum with a powdered explosive, such a mercury fulminate and detonate it, whereby the burning aluminum gives a bright, fast flash of light. There may be an article on Sciencemadness.org.
http://www.sciencemadness.org/talk/forumdisplay.php?fid=3

I read about this in a book about the physics of explosives, but never tried it.


]! :😬😬😬😬😬😬😬😬
As a chemist, I don't care what was used, playing with mercury fulminate is way more likely to put one in the hospital than you are to get the photo. It is also almost certainly requires a license to get, extremely hazardous.

Mixing any metals with oxidizing agents (fulimate is a touch senstive explosive to boot) is dangerous unless you know how. I mixed such things as a kid, ended up in hospital, damaged hearing, hand, etc.

Maybe powdered magnesium + ?, but again unless known you could seriously burn yourself at the least, I only have sight because my glasses took the brunt of the blast, by the way, mixing in an open container.

DON'T DO!!!!!
🤕🤕🤕🤕🤕🤕🤕🤕🤕🤕

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Aug 5, 2021 00:35:12   #
Wyantry Loc: SW Colorado
 
Buckeye73 wrote:
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it passed through an apple but my set up is not fast enough. I used a Miops Trigger set to the sound mode which would set off the flash set at 128 power. The camera was on bulb mode programed for 3 seconds. I used a 30 inch cubed box that I lined with black foam board to get a dark environment. I could get decent photos of the muzzle flash and the apple exploding but nothing of the bullet. The speed of the flash is based on the shortest flash duration. The flash I used was a Nikon SB800 which gives a flash duration of 1/41,000
of a second. Further research indicated it would take a flash duration of 1 millionth of a second to totally stop a bullet.
How can this be done economically?
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it pa... (show quote)


It looks, from the supplied photos, that the bullet CAN be captured in flight. Is it possible the main problem is synchronization of the bullet with its (apple) target? Perhaps a programmable time-delay could sync. the flash with the bullets entrance/pass-through of the apple. This might take MANY shots to determine the correct timing, but would still be cheaper than a multi-$$$ 30k fps camera . . . .

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Aug 5, 2021 09:12:26   #
sb Loc: Florida's East Coast
 
Doc Edgerton could freeze a large caliber bullet with his equipment, but we students in his photography lab course had to use a 22-caliber rifle. We could still cut a playing card in half or blow up an apple. We made high-speed strobes in the lab with very basic electronic components available at the time (1970 - we are speaking about a few transistors, a power supply, and a xenon flash tube). So a high-speed flash need not be expensive, but a standard speedlight flash will probably not be fast enough.

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Aug 5, 2021 10:24:35   #
hpucker99 Loc: Anchorage, Alaska
 
Loved the photo. I briefly searched for DIY flashes and came across this DIY flash:

https://www.diyphotography.net/this-guy-built-a-high-speed-diy-led-flash-and-put-the-plans-online-so-you-can-make-your-own/

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Aug 5, 2021 14:39:50   #
oregonfrank Loc: Astoria, Oregon
 
joecichjr wrote:
That must have been on evil apple to die like that 🍎🍎🍎🍎🍎


The Apple died shortly after it was picked from the tree!

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Aug 6, 2021 13:09:16   #
ecurb
 
Buckeye73 wrote:
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it passed through an apple but my set up is not fast enough. I used a Miops Trigger set to the sound mode which would set off the flash set at 128 power. The camera was on bulb mode programed for 3 seconds. I used a 30 inch cubed box that I lined with black foam board to get a dark environment. I could get decent photos of the muzzle flash and the apple exploding but nothing of the bullet. The speed of the flash is based on the shortest flash duration. The flash I used was a Nikon SB800 which gives a flash duration of 1/41,000
of a second. Further research indicated it would take a flash duration of 1 millionth of a second to totally stop a bullet.
How can this be done economically?
I tried to get a photo of a 9mm bullet after it pa... (show quote)


Check equipment rental houses. When I worked for the old Helix Rental in Chicago, we had an EG&G (Edgerton) stroboscopic flash that would have had a short enough flash duration to stop the bullet.

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Aug 6, 2021 23:59:12   #
mundy-F2 Loc: Chicago suburban area
 
ecurb wrote:
Check equipment rental houses. When I worked for the old Helix Rental in Chicago, we had an EG&G (Edgerton) stroboscopic flash that would have had a short enough flash duration to stop the bullet.


Helix on Racine in Chicago was an amazing place. I believe they opened a smaller store in suburban Chicago. I lived and worked near the old Helix location on Racine in Chicago. I purchased my 500 C/M from Helix in 1988. It is nice to see Central Camera in the Chicago Loop back in business after their fire. Both Chicago camera stores where legendary. Perhaps, on par with B&H in NYC.
Mundy

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