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DSLR vs. Cellphone Cameras
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Feb 25, 2019 09:43:13   #
gvarner Loc: Central Oregon Coast
 
Dear DSLR owners:
Do not fear the cameras in cellphones. They simply serve a niche in the photographic world and represent a transition from mainly mechanical to mainly digitally created photos. The two worlds will eventually mesh together so thoroughly that you will not be able to tell the end product from one versus the other. And if you’re just a viewer and not a printer, the difference is negligible. I can fantasize a digital zoom that equals the quality of a mechanical zoom, built-in macro with on demand focus stacking, and an ultra-high ISO without noise. They’re on their way.

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Feb 25, 2019 09:56:42   #
rond-photography Loc: Connecticut
 
gvarner wrote:
Dear DSLR owners:
Do not fear the cameras in cellphones. They simply serve a niche in the photographic world and represent a transition from mainly mechanical to mainly digitally created photos. The two worlds will eventually mesh together so thoroughly that you will not be able to tell the end product from one versus the other. And if you’re just a viewer and not a printer, the difference is negligible. I can fantasize a digital zoom that equals the quality of a mechanical zoom, built-in macro with on demand focus stacking, and an ultra-high ISO without noise. They’re on their way.
Dear DSLR owners: br Do not fear the cameras in ce... (show quote)


I can't argue what you say. All are possible and probable. I think it is the manufacturers that have to fear the phonetograph. Most people will be quite happy getting great photos from their phone. The vast majority of people have no need to instantly control the exposure, white balance, etc., by moving a dial without taking their eye away from the viewfinder (and they don't see the value of a viewfinder as a compositional aid forcing them to see in 2-D using one eye, while examining every part of the frame for problems they might avoid in camera).
Since these cameras have gotten so good, we no longer see as many people abandoning a cheap camera with less than ideal results, so they can "move up" to a DSLR and get better photos. Now they can do it with a device that is with them constantly. For those users, the camera in the phone is more than adequate.
Unfortunately, that may make the DSLR more expensive in the long run as the number of buyers declines and supply declines to the point where it is sufficient for the number of buyers in the future.
Possibly though, for now, we could see a decrease in pricing if the manufacturers need to move a lot of inventory out of wharehouses until the supply and demand stabilize (IMHO).

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Feb 25, 2019 09:58:52   #
BebuLamar
 
gvarner wrote:
Dear DSLR owners:
Do not fear the cameras in cellphones. They simply serve a niche in the photographic world and represent a transition from mainly mechanical to mainly digitally created photos. The two worlds will eventually mesh together so thoroughly that you will not be able to tell the end product from one versus the other. And if you’re just a viewer and not a printer, the difference is negligible. I can fantasize a digital zoom that equals the quality of a mechanical zoom, built-in macro with on demand focus stacking, and an ultra-high ISO without noise. They’re on their way.
Dear DSLR owners: br Do not fear the cameras in ce... (show quote)


Besides from the obvious drawbacks of the cellphone vs the DSLR the biggest problem for me with the cellphone is that it's too damn difficult to use.

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Feb 25, 2019 09:59:22   #
ELNikkor
 
Since the best cell-phones have 1 2/3 sensors, those awesome bridge cameras that have the same size sensors show us what is ultimately possible from that medium. I borrowed my neighbor's B700, set my dome tent up as a blind, and took photos of the winter birds at my feeders. Mind you, I was hand-holding, in my left hand, a barely-over-1 lb-camera, zoomed in to 1,400mm, and got pictures incredibly sharp of the tiny feathers around the eyes and beak of some purple finches, while I held the tent flap open with my right hand. The detail was amazing, and I told my neighbor when I returned the camera that I wasn't sure if I could even get photos like that with my FF Nikon and my big lenses.
Cell phone cameras have the benefit of being part of a communication system that is literally world-wide, and numbering in the billions, so everyone out there can be somewhat of a photojournalist covering more events than ever possible at any other time in history.

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Feb 25, 2019 10:00:21   #
anotherview Loc: California
 
Recently, I bought a smart phone to replace my flip phone. I've used the camera in the smart phone to take a few pictures. They simply do not measure up to the pictures from a DSLR. And I never expected them to do so.
A smart phone camera takes good snapshots. That's about the size of it.
gvarner wrote:
Dear DSLR owners:
Do not fear the cameras in cellphones. They simply serve a niche in the photographic world and represent a transition from mainly mechanical to mainly digitally created photos. The two worlds will eventually mesh together so thoroughly that you will not be able to tell the end product from one versus the other. And if you’re just a viewer and not a printer, the difference is negligible. I can fantasize a digital zoom that equals the quality of a mechanical zoom, built-in macro with on demand focus stacking, and an ultra-high ISO without noise. They’re on their way.
Dear DSLR owners: br Do not fear the cameras in ce... (show quote)

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Feb 25, 2019 10:01:58   #
georgeretired Loc: Manitoba Canada
 
I use the camera in my Samsung Cell phone, when the camera is not ready to capture a "surprise" subject and sometimes to scout out some fixed scenery. But the DSLR is still there along with a progressive choice of lens, lights etc. But photography is not just the camera, it's the person behind who can read from experience what components should be in a good picture. As you say "they're on the way", so lets see what the super techs can produce...

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Feb 25, 2019 10:16:03   #
MT Shooter Loc: Montana
 
ELNikkor wrote:
Since the best cell-phones have 1 2/3 sensors, those awesome bridge cameras that have the same size sensors show us what is ultimately possible from that medium. I borrowed my neighbor's B700, set my dome tent up as a blind, and took photos of the winter birds at my feeders. Mind you, I was hand-holding, in my left hand, a barely-over-1 lb-camera, zoomed in to 1,400mm, and got pictures incredibly sharp of the tiny feathers around the eyes and beak of some purple finches, while I held the tent flap open with my right hand. The detail was amazing, and I told my neighbor when I returned the camera that I wasn't sure if I could even get photos like that with my FF Nikon and my big lenses.
Cell phone cameras have the benefit of being part of a communication system that is literally world-wide, and numbering in the billions, so everyone out there can be somewhat of a photojournalist covering more events than ever possible at any other time in history.
Since the best cell-phones have 1 2/3 sensors, tho... (show quote)


Sorry but the LARGEST cell phone camera sensor is the 1/1.2 found only in the Nokia 808 Pureview phone, 41MP resolution. All the others are quite a bit smaller.
1/2.3 sensors are used in almost all pocket and bridge cameras except for some higher end models with up to APS-C sensors.

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Feb 25, 2019 10:25:01   #
wingclui44 Loc: CT USA
 
gvarner wrote:
Dear DSLR owners:
Do not fear the cameras in cellphones. They simply serve a niche in the photographic world and represent a transition from mainly mechanical to mainly digitally created photos. The two worlds will eventually mesh together so thoroughly that you will not be able to tell the end product from one versus the other. And if you’re just a viewer and not a printer, the difference is negligible. I can fantasize a digital zoom that equals the quality of a mechanical zoom, built-in macro with on demand focus stacking, and an ultra-high ISO without noise. They’re on their way.
Dear DSLR owners: br Do not fear the cameras in ce... (show quote)


This is my own opinion, that cellphone camera is just like a self driving car, you don't need to operate and know about car, and it will bring you where you want to, comparing to driving the car your self. You need to have lots of knowledge of photography to use a DSLR. Most of the cell-phone user who don't know any thing about photography, but picture snapper.
I am still using my "Flip Phone" and will never want a Camera phone. I don't share my pictures with any social media, they are dangerous and getting worst. I have closed my account from Facebook. The world is changing fast!

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Feb 25, 2019 10:32:25   #
MrBob Loc: lookout Mtn. NE Alabama
 
Seems to me the OP was just looking a little ahead to what the future might hold; it wasn't that long ago that folks were bashing digital; gee, now the same folks don't like mirrorless as opposed to DSLR and some don't even consider the Smartcam as a REAL camera. The real innovations come from thinking outside the box. Yes, sensor size is a factor but we are now doing elementary computing at the quantum level so go figure ! Advances in technology and computational photography will prob. astound all of us if we live that long.... Shoot, I am still looking for my Watchcam.

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Feb 25, 2019 10:50:22   #
Oldman73
 
I feel confident that a phone camera will some day give results near equal to a DSLR with a bag full of lenses. Look how far they have come in a short period of time, and also consider the money the phone manufactures have to invest in the technology due to their vast sales. With that being said will I surrender my Nikon as a primary tool to record "a moment in time" not likely, but when I look around at any venue we are the minority, and are only a small percentage compared to the Smart Phone. As the phone evolves even some of us may turn to the new technology, one thing I have learned in my life is never say never.

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Feb 25, 2019 11:05:38   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
A quick look at the DR and low light / high ISO capability of cellphones will tell you why there is still a market for DSLR & MILC with larger sensors and the attendant larger lenses. I will note that there has been a “dumbing down” in terms of acceptable quality of most sensory media in the last decade or so. Probably the majority of today’s listeners have never heard good quality audio and are satisfied with MP3s; and by the same token, most of the photos they see are web-sized with limited resolution. Sadly for a majority of our population, convenience is more important than quality.

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Feb 25, 2019 11:19:42   #
gvarner Loc: Central Oregon Coast
 
MrBob wrote:
Seems to me the OP was just looking a little ahead to what the future might hold; it wasn't that long ago that folks were bashing digital; gee, now the same folks don't like mirrorless as opposed to DSLR and some don't even consider the Smartcam as a REAL camera. The real innovations come from thinking outside the box. Yes, sensor size is a factor but we are now doing elementary computing at the quantum level so go figure ! Advances in technology and computational photography will prob. astound all of us if we live that long.... Shoot, I am still looking for my Watchcam.
Seems to me the OP was just looking a little ahead... (show quote)


👍👍. When I think about the detail we get from cameras in space, cameras on telescopes, that’s where I see the future of photography going. Who knows what the next gen photo processor will be able to do? As for those who belittle the photos from these little gizmos, take a look on YouTube what Emil Pakarklis can do with an iPhone XR, plus Snapseed and a few other editing marvels. He’s quite impressive but you have to realize, as even with DSLR's, you still have to work within the limits if it’s technology. Now we can have a debate over the iPhone and all the others. 😜😜. Carry on.

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Feb 25, 2019 11:33:10   #
kpmac Loc: Ragley, La
 
My cell phone is a pre-flip phone. It's so classic crowds gather to look at it when I take it out; which isn't often. It's a phone used for phone calls. I do believe we will see awesome phone cameras but I won't be using one.

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Feb 25, 2019 12:13:32   #
rook2c4 Loc: Philadelphia, PA USA
 
wingclui44 wrote:
This is my own opinion, that cellphone camera is just like a self driving car, you don't need to operate and know about car, and it will bring you where you want to, comparing to driving the car your self. You need to have lots of knowledge of photography to use a DSLR. Most of the cell-phone user who don't know any thing about photography, but picture snapper.
I am still using my "Flip Phone" and will never want a Camera phone. I don't share my pictures with any social media, they are dangerous and getting worst. I have closed my account from Facebook. The world is changing fast!
This is my own opinion, that cellphone camera is j... (show quote)


With apps, the cellphone camera can be much more than the equivalent of a self driving car! There are very few things a DSLR can do that the a smartphone camera with the right app installed and/or accessory attached cannot do.

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Feb 25, 2019 12:57:09   #
wingclui44 Loc: CT USA
 
rook2c4 wrote:
With apps, the cellphone camera can be much more than the equivalent of a self driving car! There are very few things a DSLR can do that the a smartphone camera with the right app installed and/or accessory attached cannot do.


How don't really care how much a cell phone can do, camera is a camera that is for photography, not for anything else, like doing phone call; banking ; remote controlling everything;monitoring home security system; getting news; spying on some one ....etc. Yes, it's a power device as a pocket computer. That's driving every body crazy, not me. Camera is strictly for photography period!

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