Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Where was the blood red moon?
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Page: <<prev 1 2 3 4 5 next>>
Jan 23, 2019 16:13:54   #
larryepage
 
If the earth did not have an atmosphere, the moon would have been in 'total' darkness at the height of the eclipse, completely blocked from all sunlight and illuminated only by starlight. It would have been visible only as a black circle in the sky where stars were blocked from view. But since the earth does have an atmosphere, sunlight is refracted around it. Violet and blue light are refracted most and end up completely missing the moon. But red light is refracted just enough to converge on the moon from all sides, illuminating it very slightly. Interestingly enough, all full eclipses result in the moon being illuminated with this red light.

Because this light is very faint, it is visible only during totality. If direct sunlight is falling on any portion of the lunar surface, it is reflected back to our eyes with enough intensity that our eyes are blocked from seeing the red illumination on the shaded portion. It's still there, we just can't resolve it.

Now...approximately 1/3 of the population is color blind. Color blindness takes a number of forms, but the most common is red/green color blindness. This condition sometimes prevents the ability to discriminate red from green and sometimes prevents the ability to discriminate red from luminance (brightness or whiteness).

There are any number of reasons why anyone might not be able to detect the red color.

By the way...all total eclipses are called "blood moons."

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 16:28:32   #
nervous2
 
foxfirerodandgun wrote:
At 98% full eclipse it was not a bit red here in SE VA either.


That's when you pull out those red filters from our film days.

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 16:33:04   #
nervous2
 
Metis407 wrote:
Longboat Key, Florida. 12:30 am Monday morning!!!
With stars this is one of the more pleasing shots I have seen. Nice work.

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 17:07:53   #
hpucker99
 
47greyfox wrote:
In Colorado front range, our moon was pretty dark, straight up, and tricky to shoot. I abandoned the tripod early on. For a while, I wondered if I was even going to get one I could use. Finally, I went to auto iso and center point autofocus, took a few shots once I found the moon in the viewfinder then went to manual focus and took a few more. In post, I was able to add a little exposure and detail. Definitely not an easy one.


I was south of you at the Great Sand Dunes National Park. Moon was straight up and very red.

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 17:11:07   #
hpucker99
 
Wanderer2 wrote:
Here in Colorado my shots show the moon becoming red as the eclipse deepened. All of them with more than 50% or so shadow show a red moon over the shaded part. Exposure has a lot to do with it, or so it seemed to me - I did a lot of bracketing. Don't know if it had any effect but I was at 7800 ft. elevation.


I saw similar behavior as the eclipse progressed. I was at the Great Sand Dunes in southern Colorado.

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 17:12:46   #
paparue
 
I am in Bedford Va and it was Red here

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 17:30:50   #
Malco
 
The totally eclipsed moon was red everywhere the eclipse can be seen. Its just that some people weren't properly educated to know what to look for. Even if you looked at the eclipsed moon with your naked eye, it was to dark to see much color. Looking through a telescope or a properly exposed photo is the way to see the blood moon.

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 17:37:03   #
cambriaman (a regular here)
 
The Central California Coast was under heavy cloud. Nothing seen here.

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 18:15:39   #
Thurber Mingus
 
The conditions were tough but I managed to get a few from Texas...I'll know a few tricks for next time!


(Download)

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 18:20:14   #
Tom M
 
Malco wrote:
Nice shot!


Thank you for that, Malco :)

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 18:26:33   #
Tom M
 
Thurber Mingus wrote:
The conditions were tough but I managed to get a few from Texas...I'll know a few tricks for next time!


Nice!

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 18:32:17   #
Thurber Mingus
 
Tom M wrote:
Nice!


Thanks!

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 20:28:21   #
Darren01
 
YEP, Visibility being the key factor. The night before was clear as a bell, Sunday night was a heavy marine layer, Any one who lives on the west coast knows what that means. Can not be shoost ing the moon. The other starts out with 200lb woman on the corner of any given cross road. Heavy Marine Layer.. DUH
Semper FI

| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 20:59:38   #
stangro
 
Here's mine, from Central New Jersey. Nikon D500 with 200-500mm lens, set at 500mm. Exposure: 1.0 sec, f5.6, ISO 400, manual focus. Heavily cropped.



| Reply
Jan 23, 2019 21:03:29   #
nsilberma
 
Here is a sample before the clouds covered the full red.



| Reply
Page: <<prev 1 2 3 4 5 next>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2019 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.