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Blacked out exposures.
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Sep 22, 2022 13:29:17   #
whatdat Loc: Del Valle, Tx.
 
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice recently while taking photos of flowers I have had an occurrence that I have never run into on any other camera or lens I have: set on shutter speed to get a higher shutter speed to offset the wind moving flowers I have encountered a situation where the first shot looks fine, then next several shots almost completely blacked out. Same settings, same scene. I noticed on the last one the aperture was blinking at 3.5 (the widest on the lens/camera adjusting shutter speed to 1/4000). Haven’t done any testing with the lens on a different camera or the camera with a different lens. Only happened twice. Suggestions where to begin solving the problem? Any help appreciated.

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Sep 22, 2022 13:55:47   #
Linda From Maine Loc: Yakima, Washington
 
The blinking was warning you that the aperture couldn't open any wider, so your exposure would be dark unless you lowered your shutter speed and/or changed your ISO.

Sun in and out of clouds, or any other reason the light might have been different? How certain are you that your settings were exactly the same? I have found I'll sometimes move my shutter speed dial accidentally.

Do you still have the good and a bad? Post here, and click "store original" before clicking add attachment.

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Sep 22, 2022 22:33:10   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
whatdat wrote:
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice recently while taking photos of flowers I have had an occurrence that I have never run into on any other camera or lens I have: set on shutter speed to get a higher shutter speed to offset the wind moving flowers I have encountered a situation where the first shot looks fine, then next several shots almost completely blacked out. Same settings, same scene. I noticed on the last one the aperture was blinking at 3.5 (the widest on the lens/camera adjusting shutter speed to 1/4000). Haven’t done any testing with the lens on a different camera or the camera with a different lens. Only happened twice. Suggestions where to begin solving the problem? Any help appreciated.
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice re... (show quote)


What could you possibly be shooting that required 1/4000sec?? Wind-blown flowers don't require that fast, and if they did, it's the wrong subject on the wrong day. As requested, a posted example is always the best way to avoid unnecessary guessing.

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Sep 23, 2022 07:20:47   #
mikeroetex Loc: Lafayette, LA
 
whatdat wrote:
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice recently while taking photos of flowers I have had an occurrence that I have never run into on any other camera or lens I have: set on shutter speed to get a higher shutter speed to offset the wind moving flowers I have encountered a situation where the first shot looks fine, then next several shots almost completely blacked out. Same settings, same scene. I noticed on the last one the aperture was blinking at 3.5 (the widest on the lens/camera adjusting shutter speed to 1/4000). Haven’t done any testing with the lens on a different camera or the camera with a different lens. Only happened twice. Suggestions where to begin solving the problem? Any help appreciated.
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice re... (show quote)

Raise the ISO.

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Sep 23, 2022 09:25:18   #
gvarner Loc: Central Oregon Coast
 
whatdat wrote:
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice recently while taking photos of flowers I have had an occurrence that I have never run into on any other camera or lens I have: set on shutter speed to get a higher shutter speed to offset the wind moving flowers I have encountered a situation where the first shot looks fine, then next several shots almost completely blacked out. Same settings, same scene. I noticed on the last one the aperture was blinking at 3.5 (the widest on the lens/camera adjusting shutter speed to 1/4000). Haven’t done any testing with the lens on a different camera or the camera with a different lens. Only happened twice. Suggestions where to begin solving the problem? Any help appreciated.
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice re... (show quote)


Maybe try Manual mode with Auto ISO and do some trial and error.

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Sep 23, 2022 11:57:53   #
SuperflyTNT Loc: Manassas VA
 
CHG_CANON wrote:
What could you possibly be shooting that required 1/4000sec?? Wind-blown flowers don't require that fast, and if they did, it's the wrong subject on the wrong day. As requested, a posted example is always the best way to avoid unnecessary guessing.


Yeah, if the wind is blowing hard enough to require 1/4000 for a flower then there has to be something going on more interesting than flowers.

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Sep 23, 2022 12:48:54   #
tcthome Loc: Keansburg , NJ
 
gvarner wrote:
Maybe try Manual mode with Auto ISO and do some trial and error.


Possible max iso set to low?

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Sep 23, 2022 15:33:37   #
Boris77
 
whatdat wrote:
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice recently while taking photos of flowers I have had an occurrence that I have never run into on any other camera or lens I have: set on shutter speed to get a higher shutter speed to offset the wind moving flowers I have encountered a situation where the first shot looks fine, then next several shots almost completely blacked out. Same settings, same scene. I noticed on the last one the aperture was blinking at 3.5 (the widest on the lens/camera adjusting shutter speed to 1/4000). Haven’t done any testing with the lens on a different camera or the camera with a different lens. Only happened twice. Suggestions where to begin solving the problem? Any help appreciated.
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice re... (show quote)


Others are right that image information could explain a lot, but simplistic question: do you normally shoot in the same exposure mode and what was it during the malfunctions?
I preset a camera before I go out to a specific event, and often use that priority thruout the shoot.
Boris

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Sep 23, 2022 18:13:52   #
whatdat Loc: Del Valle, Tx.
 
I appreciate the replies concerning iso on my Nikon d5500. After some more research, I have found out that auto iso on this camera is tricky, supposedly not doable in P, A, S, or M mode (only working when used in scene mode). So apparently, I will need to adjust iso and/or shutter speed as needed. Which is ok as I can experiment as needed. My confusion lay in the fact that the first picture would turn out fine, but, subsequent pics would be very underexposed even though taken immediately after the first shot with all parameters remaining the same as the original pic.

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Sep 23, 2022 18:58:09   #
amfoto1 Loc: San Jose, Calif. USA
 
whatdat wrote:
...After some more research, I have found out that auto iso on this camera is tricky, supposedly not doable in P, A, S, or M mode (only working when used in scene mode).....


I think you should check again.

Very likely you've got that backwards.

Auto ISO should ONLY work on P, A, S or M. It should NOT work in the scene modes! That would make no sense.

Actually, in my opinion Auto ISO should only be used with M. To me it makes no sense to use it with P, A or S.

When you use Auto ISO with M you get a form of auto exposure (AE). You select the shutter speed and the aperture, the camera then selects the ISO that it thinks will make for a correct exposure. You would use this when you need to control both the depth of field (aperture) and motion blur (shutter speed).

A is Aperture Priority AE, where you select the aperture and the ISO, leaving it to the camera to choose a shutter speed. You use this when you are concerned about depth of field, but not worried about motion blur.

S is Shutter Priority AE, where you select the shutter speed and ISO, leaving it to the camera to choose an aperture. Use the when concerned about stopping (or deliberately blurring) motion, but not worried about depth of field.

There is some predictability with all the above, since the camera is only varying one parameter of the "exposure triangle". You can use Exposure Compensation to override what the camera is doing.

P is Program AE mode where you set the ISO and camera chooses both the aperture and shutter speed. Most experienced shooters don't use P very much. It lets the camera choose two variables, which makes results less predictable. If you dial in Exposure Compensation, will it effect the aperture or the shutter speed, or some of each?

If you use Auto ISO with A or S you once again are giving the camera two variables to work with and have the same concerns as P.

If you use Auto ISO with P it's even worse... you're giving the camera three variables to work with so will have even less predictability than any of the other modes.

Of course you can do what you want and maybe you'll find some uses for other modes, but personally I see no need for Auto ISO with anything other than M.

You mentioned that "f/3.5 was flashing" in your viewfinder. That's the camera warning you that your settings are such that the image will be underexposed. Apparently by a lot, since it came out completely dark. If it had instead been flashing the smallest lens aperture (such as f/16 or f/22 or whatever), that would be the camera warning you that the image will be overexposed. It will do the same with the shutter speeds, if using S exposure mode. A flashing "30" indicates underexposure, while a flashing "1/4000" (or 1/8000, if camera has that shutter speed) is telling you the image will be overexposed.

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Sep 23, 2022 20:06:27   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
whatdat wrote:
I appreciate the replies concerning iso on my Nikon d5500. After some more research, I have found out that auto iso on this camera is tricky, supposedly not doable in P, A, S, or M mode (only working when used in scene mode). So apparently, I will need to adjust iso and/or shutter speed as needed. Which is ok as I can experiment as needed. My confusion lay in the fact that the first picture would turn out fine, but, subsequent pics would be very underexposed even though taken immediately after the first shot with all parameters remaining the same as the original pic.
I appreciate the replies concerning iso on my Niko... (show quote)


Whatever you think you read, you read it wrong.

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Sep 23, 2022 21:16:19   #
Architect1776 Loc: In my mind
 
whatdat wrote:
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice recently while taking photos of flowers I have had an occurrence that I have never run into on any other camera or lens I have: set on shutter speed to get a higher shutter speed to offset the wind moving flowers I have encountered a situation where the first shot looks fine, then next several shots almost completely blacked out. Same settings, same scene. I noticed on the last one the aperture was blinking at 3.5 (the widest on the lens/camera adjusting shutter speed to 1/4000). Haven’t done any testing with the lens on a different camera or the camera with a different lens. Only happened twice. Suggestions where to begin solving the problem? Any help appreciated.
I have a d5500 with a Nikon 18-140 lens. Twice re... (show quote)


With no examples, I would have to say that the camera just got tired after the 1st shot.

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Sep 24, 2022 02:00:22   #
whatdat Loc: Del Valle, Tx.
 
Thanks to all who responded concerning auto iso. After re-reading the dummies manual I now realize I was wrong in my interpretation. I shouldn’t read info like this so late at night. Again, thanks everyone for responding & helping me work this out.

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Sep 24, 2022 09:09:57   #
dbrugger25 Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
I was photograhing a baptism party last year with my Canon R5. I let my grandson take a few photos and from then-on all the photos were underexposed. Somehow, he had set the exposure compensation to an extreme. The EVF showed the images perfectly so I didn't notice the setting.

When I processes the photos in Photoshop, I discovered that all of them could be fixed to an acceptable level but it took a lot of time.

Now, I have a mental checklist that I go through whenever I start shooting.

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Sep 24, 2022 09:31:58   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
dbrugger25 wrote:
... When I processes the photos in Photoshop, I discovered that all of them could be fixed to an acceptable level but it took a lot of time.


In Lightroom, you fix one and then sync that update to the exposure (and discrete other updates, as needed) across all the images that need the same fix. Very fast, very efficient.

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