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U.S. $10,000 Bill
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May 9, 2022 15:31:40   #
bobbyjohn Loc: Dallas, TX
 
The $10,000 bill featuring the portrait of President Lincoln’s Secretary of the Treasury, Salmon P. Chase, was the highest denomination US currency ever to publicly circulate. Although a $100,000 bill featuring the portrait of Woodrow Wilson was issued, its purpose was to transfer funds between Federal Reserve Banks, and not to pass in retail transactions. Since 1969, the highest denomination note issued in the US has been the $100 bill.

How much is a $10,000 bill worth today?

A $10,000 bill in pristine (great) condition can be worth upwards of $140,000 to collectors. But even if your bill is in poor condition, it can still be worth around $30,000. So make sure you know the value of your paper currency before taking them to a bank or using them at Walmart.

And in answer to your yet-to-be-asked question...No, I didn't scan this bill on my Epson scanner, as I don't have such a bill.

What's in your wallet?



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May 9, 2022 15:40:14   #
DirtFarmer Loc: Way too close to New York City
 
The first ATM I used would deliver $10 bills. Shortly after that, $20 became the standard denomination from an ATM. I haven't used ATMs in a long time but I am led to believe that many of them only use $50s, at least in NYC.

On the farm stand we dealt with $20s a lot, with an occasional $50 and maybe half a dozen $100s a year. The number of $100 bills per year was increasing when I retired. We didn't take credit cards, but the new guys running the farm do. It has become much easier, but there's still a charge from the credit company to handle the transactions. That rate is higher than the interest rate over the last few years.

Two years ago I carried cash in my wallet. Maybe a couple hundred. Now everything is plastic. From $1 to a few thousand. Fortunately some of my cards provide points to encourage me to use them so I get a little bit of money back. Still less than inflation.

Since cash is getting less common, my coin sorting bank is getting a lot less use. I used to have lots of rolls of quarters for parking meters (I remember when some of them would take nickels and dimes). Now the banks are begging for coins. (On the farm stand we used a LOT of quarters. I would buy a $500 box of quarters from the bank at the beginning of the season. Usually we would need more before the end of the season).

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May 9, 2022 15:57:25   #
UTMike Loc: South Jordan, UT
 
Interesting!

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May 9, 2022 16:06:24   #
fredpnm Loc: Corrales, NM
 
And did you know the mint has printed more $100.00 bills than $1.00 bills?

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May 9, 2022 16:10:52   #
bobbyjohn Loc: Dallas, TX
 
fredpnm wrote:
And did you know the mint has printed more $100.00 bills than $1.00 bills?

I didn't know that.

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May 9, 2022 16:20:01   #
PhotogHobbyist Loc: Bradford, PA
 
With all the talk of going to plastic money and a cashless society and adding in the "excitement" over bitcoin, Hiw are kids going to get paid by the tooth fairy? Will yard sales go by the wayside?

Not meaning to be preaching, but in the Bible, the book of Revelation tells that only those with the mark of the Beast will be have the ability to purchase things like clothing and food. Will bitcoin and a cashless society be the mark of the Beast?

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May 9, 2022 16:27:16   #
JoeBiker Loc: homebase: Houston, TX
 
A few years ago, my sister-in-law gave my brother-in-law a mint condition $1000 bill, to thank him for some help he had done. (Even though he was a coin collector), he didn't realize they weren't still in circulation. He took it the bank to deposit it, and they didn't know what to do with it (that was his first clue). Driving away, it dawned on him. He called a collector, found out what it was worth (I didn't remember, but it was more that a thousand), went back to the bank, said "Umm, can I get that bill back?". They still didn't know what to do with it, so they gave it back to him and he added it to his collection (now a near-mint condition bill, but with a story to tell).

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May 9, 2022 16:37:12   #
rmorrison1116 Loc: Near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
 
fredpnm wrote:
And did you know the mint has printed more $100.00 bills than $1.00 bills?


Did you know the US Mint has not printed any $100 bills or $1 bills?! The US Mint makes coins, not paper currency. That would be the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

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May 9, 2022 16:40:51   #
rmorrison1116 Loc: Near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
 
bobbyjohn wrote:
I didn't know that.


You didn't know that maybe because it's not correct?!

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May 9, 2022 16:44:44   #
foodie65
 
rmorrison1116 wrote:
Did you know the US Mint has not printed any $100 bills or $1 bills?! The US Mint makes coins, not paper currency. That would be the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.


Good catch, you beat me to it

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May 9, 2022 16:58:04   #
rmorrison1116 Loc: Near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
 
foodie65 wrote:
Good catch, you beat me to it


I was reading away and realized, hmmm, that's not accurate. I've been to the US Mint in Philadelphia and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington, DC. Both interesting places to visit.

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May 9, 2022 17:36:03   #
flip1948 Loc: Hamden, CT
 
fredpnm wrote:
And did you know the mint has printed more $100.00 bills than $1.00 bills?

Actually the Mint hasn't printed any.

It's the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

Just being a stickler.

P.S. - just noticed I was a late stickler.

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May 9, 2022 17:37:17   #
DirtFarmer Loc: Way too close to New York City
 
PhotogHobbyist wrote:
With all the talk of going to plastic money and a cashless society and adding in the "excitement" over bitcoin, Hiw are kids going to get paid by the tooth fairy?...


Prepaid gift cards?

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May 9, 2022 17:39:59   #
rmorrison1116 Loc: Near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
 
flip1948 wrote:
Actually the Mint hasn't printed any.

It's the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

Just being a stickler.

P.S. - just noticed I was a late stickler.


Thank you for the validation...

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May 9, 2022 18:13:15   #
bobbyjohn Loc: Dallas, TX
 
rmorrison1116 wrote:
Did you know the US Mint has not printed any $100 bills or $1 bills?! The US Mint makes coins, not paper currency. That would be the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

Did you know that the paper that U.S. Currency is made from comes from only 1 company, the Crane Company, and security at that company is tight...if the paper alone got into the wrong hands, like counterfeiters, they'd be able to print some counterfeits that might even fool bank tellers.

• Crane and Co., a Massachusetts-based company, has been providing the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing with paper for U.S. currency since 1879.
• Federal Reserve notes are a blend of 25 percent linen and 75 percent cotton. Currency paper has tiny red and blue synthetic fibers of various lengths evenly distributed throughout the paper.
• It would take 4,000 double folds, forwards and backwards, to tear a banknote.
• No matter the denomination, a banknote weighs approximately 1 gram. Because there are 454 grams in one pound, this means there are 454 notes in one pound of currency.
• Want to measure your notes in a different way? A stack of currency one mile high would contain more than 14.5 million banknotes.
• It is estimated that between one-half to two-thirds of the value of all U.S. currency in circulation is outside of the U.S.

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