Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Which camera
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Jun 28, 2020 22:53:10   #
7207327689
 
Which DSLR Camera would you buy, I am a beginner, and maybe you should choose one for lowest price for the money, next medium price, and highest price. Landscape and wildlife photography is what I want to start with, and if you think I should start with something else first then say so!! Debra

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Jun 28, 2020 23:26:18   #
wetreed
 
Your by bet would be the Nikon D3500 or Nikon D5600 with the double lens kit or the 18-140 kit lens.

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Jun 28, 2020 23:28:12   #
Scruples Loc: Brooklyn, New York
 
7207327689 wrote:
Which DSLR Camera would you buy, I am a beginner, and maybe you should choose one for lowest price for the money, next medium price, and highest price. Landscape and wildlife photography is what I want to start with, and if you think I should start with something else first then say so!! Debra


Debra:
Welcome to Your Forum. Good Luck With Your Choice! I would like to let you know that you may have opened a kettle of fish. Each one of us has our experiences, preferences and prejudices to share. You might have begun the age old word war. Pick a camera, any camera is good for starters. Play, Practice and Experiment. And, do it again!
To let you know, the camera doesn’t take photographs. It only does 2% of the task at hand. It is the nut in the viewfinder that does 98% of the photo.

Happy Shooting!

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Jun 28, 2020 23:30:36   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
Debra
Welcome to the forum. I think you will get more support from our forum if you let us know what research you have already done. I spent 2 months last year learning Online about today’s camera technologies and capabilities before I started narrowing it down to brands and price levels . Nevertheless, you will get plenty of information here from many different directions. Good luck.
Mark

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Jun 28, 2020 23:31:00   #
Mac Loc: Hernando County Florida
 
7207327689 wrote:
Which DSLR Camera would you buy, I am a beginner, and maybe you should choose one for lowest price for the money, next medium price, and highest price. Landscape and wildlife photography is what I want to start with, and if you think I should start with something else first then say so!! Debra


Welcome to UHH. I agree with wetreed's suggestion.

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Jun 28, 2020 23:35:21   #
robertjerl Loc: Corona, California
 
7207327689 wrote:
Which DSLR Camera would you buy, I am a beginner, and maybe you should choose one for lowest price for the money, next medium price, and highest price. Landscape and wildlife photography is what I want to start with, and if you think I should start with something else first then say so!! Debra


Landscape calls for wide and ultra wide angle lenses and Full Frame bodies work best with those.
Wildlife(birds?) calls for a long reach which is either a very long lens ($$$$) or an APS-C/Crop Sensor body or both in combination.

I am a Canon user and I presently use three bodies: two APS-C/crop sensor = 80D (intermediate level body better than the Rebel series) and 7DII (semi-pro designed for wildlife and sports) and one FF/full frame = 5DIV semipro/pro level body.

The 7DII is great at what it does but the design is several years old and due for a replacement.
The replacement for the 80D (90D) is out and is almost good enough to be a replacement for the 7DII, just missing a few features. But if I could only buy one camera and wanted to do the types of pictures you do I think I would go for the 90D at this time. Pretty good at wide angle/landscape with an ultra wide lens and very good at the "long reach" wildlife and bird stuff. to save some money get an 80D, many dealers still have them in stock and are discounting them since the 90D came out.
If the landscape is more important or you want better dim light performance than the 5DIV or the less expensive 6DII. A FF will work great for wildlife and birds, you just have to work harder to get closer (or be lucky).

The lowest price body I would recommend is the T8i, the latest Canon crop sensor body and a great bargain. It is smaller and lighter than the others I recommended.

The lenses could get very pricey, esp the long lenses for wildlife and birds. Generally 300-400 mm is the minimum for wildlife and birds unless you have a place where you can get close. Esp birds as most of them are small or even tiny.

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Jun 28, 2020 23:46:32   #
Mac Loc: Hernando County Florida
 
robertjerl wrote:
Landscape calls for wide and ultra wide angle lenses


I disagree with you statement that landscape calls for wide and ultra-wide lenses. Any focal length is good for landscapes, from ultra-wide to telephoto. It all depends on what the photographer wants to show. Most of my landscapes/seascapes have been taken with 35mm, 40mm, 50mm and 85mm primes. I have seen landscapes taken at longer than 85mm.

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Jun 28, 2020 23:53:40   #
CHG_CANON Loc: the Windy City
 
The EOS 8Ti is by far your best bet. If you go with the 18-55 kit, add the EF 70-300II and you'll be set.

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Jun 28, 2020 23:58:10   #
jaymatt Loc: Alexandria, Indiana
 
I completely agree with CHG_CANON about the Canon EOS 8Ti if you are going to get a DSLR. If you’re considering a mirrorless, I suggest one of the Sony A6000+ series.

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Jun 29, 2020 01:46:59   #
twosummers
 
Mirrorless cameras are the future so have a look at Canon R and RP

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Jun 29, 2020 02:15:04   #
robertjerl Loc: Corona, California
 
Mac wrote:
I disagree with you statement that landscape calls for wide and ultra-wide lenses. Any focal length is good for landscapes, from ultra-wide to telephoto. It all depends on what the photographer wants to show. Most of my landscapes/seascapes have been taken with 35mm, 40mm, 50mm and 85mm primes. I have seen landscapes taken at longer than 85mm.


And I have done landscape panorama shots with a 400 mm using up to 20 frames for a mountain range. But in general most people think of landscape as wide sweeping views and those are best done with wide or ultra-wide lenses. Longer lenses are great to do limited area or detail shots of the landscape. I think of those as "nature", not landscape. The multi frame method doesn't work if you have moving things in the view. I have also done portrait oriented landscapes to show a sense of distance.

Take the average person to say the rim of the Grand Canyon and they want a wide sweeping image showing the canyon. I have seen people throw out their arms and say something like I want a picture from there to there.

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Jun 29, 2020 02:44:35   #
Vince68 Loc: Wappingers Falls, NY
 
7207327689 wrote:
Which DSLR Camera would you buy, I am a beginner, and maybe you should choose one for lowest price for the money, next medium price, and highest price. Landscape and wildlife photography is what I want to start with, and if you think I should start with something else first then say so!! Debra


Welcome to UHH Debra. I am a Nikon user, so if I was going to recommend a camera brand, I would say Nikon. A Canon user will say Canon, and a Sony user will say Sony. They are all good cameras, as are others such as Fuji, Olympus, Panasonic, and others. You also may want to consider a mirrorless camera as well besides a DSLR.

Take the advice that you get here, and then go to a camera store in your area and try some different models in the store to see how they feel in your hand, check out the menus, etc. You will get lots of good advice here, but it is up to you to choose what you are comfortable with, and what your budget will allow.

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Jun 29, 2020 05:27:56   #
miked46 Loc: Winter Springs, Florida
 
Look into the new Canon 850 with the kit lens, it offers a lot for a low price.

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Jun 29, 2020 05:54:55   #
R.G. Loc: Scotland
 
Since you're showing more than a casual interest I suggest you buy a camera that you can grow into. That would exclude entry level cameras like the Nikon D3000 series. The D5500 or D5600 would be a good choice and you may find good deals that come with good kit lenses.

Landscape photography would be a good starting point and would hopefully help you to develop a good sense of composition. Wildlife can be rewarding but it's a bit more challenging than landscape. Not only is getting the capture harder, it's more demanding as far as settings go, so it's something to work towards. Doing landscape as your starting point will give you a chance to get used to using your camera and you'll be choosing camera settings in less demanding circumstances.

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Jun 29, 2020 06:06:51   #
CO
 
The only real problem with the Nikon D3500 is they have removed the ultrasonic sensor cleaner. All other Nikon cameras have a sensor cleaner built-in. If you were to get the D3500, you would want to get a blower to use if dust spots appear. I use the Koh Global Hepa Jet Air II blower. It has a large hepa filter, an anti-static filter, one-way check valve, and medical grade PVC bulb.

Entry level DSLR cameras usually have a pentamirror viewfinder. If you go the a mid level or above DSLR you get a superior pentaprism viewfinder. The glass prism inside gives a larger, slight brighter view through the viewfinder. I would recommend a Nikon D7500 or D500.
Pentaprism viewfinder left, Pentamirror viewfinder right
Pentaprism viewfinder left, Pentamirror viewfinder...
(Download)

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