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Feb 11, 2019 10:00:26   #
moosus
 
I was wondering what I could've done, on-site and in-camera, to keep from burning out the whites in the Flamingos so that I wouldn't have to deal with this issue in PP. I shot this pic with my Nikon D7200, 1/2000 sec., f/6.3, ISO 8000 and at 240mm on my Nikon 18-300mm f3.5/6.3. I usually use the E/V button and stop the exp. down one or two stops but, might this be an ETTR situation? Informative suggestions will be appreciated but please, leave the snarkasm home. And yeah, I've watched YT concerning ETTR. MM


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Feb 11, 2019 10:04:56   #
Zooman 1
 
8000 ISO? I think a lower ISO would have solved your over exposure of the highlights.

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Feb 11, 2019 10:09:41   #
gilpog
 
I think that there are 2 issues here: the ISO and the shutter speed. It seems to me that the ISO is set way too high given the fact that the speed of the shoot is also unreasonably high. Setting the ISO in any camera is a tricky matter and may result in blown out highlights. I would recommend that you lower the ISO to a point where the exposure is better like around 1/100 or slightly faster. Your color saturation will improve.

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Feb 11, 2019 10:50:16   #
moosus
 
Thank U for UR quick response. U say it and now it becomes obvious.

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Feb 11, 2019 11:22:16   #
kpmac (a regular here)
 
Correct, ISO 8000 is way too high.

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Feb 11, 2019 12:09:21   #
SonyA580
 
Tricky shot. I think spot metering would have been the trick here. There is really only one bird that is important (the one in the middle) so I would have metered that one, which would have probably decreased the exposure and kept the highlights from blowing out. Ends up being ETTR. Agree, ISO 8000 outdoors on a sunny day is simply not necessary or advisable.

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Feb 12, 2019 07:23:26   #
fergmark (a regular here)
 
This is why people prefer RAW. Big safety net.

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Feb 12, 2019 08:20:22   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
I'm in the excessively high ISO setting crowd. Interestingly, a lot of my intentionally start out looking like this.
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-574841-1.html
But, that's intentional.

Just out of curiosity, why was your ISO set to 8000?
--Bob
moosus wrote:
I was wondering what I could've done, on-site and in-camera, to keep from burning out the whites in the Flamingos so that I wouldn't have to deal with this issue in PP. I shot this pic with my Nikon D7200, 1/2000 sec., f/6.3, ISO 8000 and at 240mm on my Nikon 18-300mm f3.5/6.3. I usually use the E/V button and stop the exp. down one or two stops but, might this be an ETTR situation? Informative suggestions will be appreciated but please, leave the snarkasm home. And yeah, I've watched YT concerning ETTR. MM
I was wondering what I could've done, on-site and ... (show quote)

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Feb 12, 2019 10:27:35   #
AzPicLady (a regular here)
 
Did you use evaluative metering or spot metering? When shooting these types of images, I always check with spot metering (if there's time) and try to get the highlights within range. If I'm getting lots of "blinkies" on the review screen, I'll either reset my overall settings, or take it down a bit.

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Feb 12, 2019 13:33:19   #
Sirsnapalot
 
gilpog wrote:
I think that there are 2 issues here: the ISO and the shutter speed. It seems to me that the ISO is set way too high given the fact that the speed of the shoot is also unreasonably high. Setting the ISO in any camera is a tricky matter and may result in blown out highlights. I would recommend that you lower the ISO to a point where the exposure is better like around 1/100 or slightly faster. Your color saturation will improve.


I agree, and I would also stop down my iris a notch

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Feb 12, 2019 15:43:20   #
elee950021
 
moosus wrote:
I was wondering what I could've done, on-site and in-camera, to keep from burning out the whites in the Flamingos so that I wouldn't have to deal with this issue in PP. I shot this pic with my Nikon D7200, 1/2000 sec., f/6.3, ISO 8000 and at 240mm on my Nikon 18-300mm f3.5/6.3. MM


Moosus!

I use both a D800 and D7100 and I suggest a couple possible methods to keep the highlights from overexposing:

a. As you use a Nikon also, try "Active D-lighting" in the "Shooting" menu, choose "high" or "very high" setting to help keep the highlights in check;
b. Using "Picture Control" also in the "Shooting" menu, select "Standard" or "Neutral" settings and lower the contrast (2nd item below "Sharpness,) " a tick or two.

Personally, I don't think using ISO 8000 is a problem, the image's noisiness is not bad but using F8 and a corresponding slower shutter speed might have provided better sharpness and more depth of field.

Cheers, Ed.

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Feb 12, 2019 17:10:53   #
photogeneralist (a regular here)
 
The problem here is that the brightness range exceeds the cameras dynamic range capability
1. As others have noted, with higher ISO comes less usable dynamic range. I don't know how much but it's significant.
2. Bracketed shots then combine the exposures with a HDR application
3. Maybe both approaches simultaneously

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Feb 12, 2019 17:14:11   #
photogeneralist (a regular here)
 
The problem here is that the brightness range exceeds the cameras dynamic range capability
1. As others have noted, with higher ISO comes less usable dynamic range. I don't know how much but it's significant.
2. Bracketed shots then combine the exposures with a HDR application
3. Maybe both approaches simultaneously

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Feb 14, 2019 15:31:46   #
boberic (a regular here)
 
SonyA580 wrote:
Tricky shot. I think spot metering would have been the trick here. There is really only one bird that is important (the one in the middle) so I would have metered that one, which would have probably decreased the exposure and kept the highlights from blowing out. Ends up being ETTR. Agree, ISO 8000 outdoors on a sunny day is simply not necessary or advisable.


Spot metering was the first thing that I thought of as well. I saw in EXIF data that pattern metering was used. Whenever there are 2 extremes, stark white and black in the same scene, a choice must be made as to which one you want. The way meters function you can't have both. Do you expose for the white and lose the detail in the dark part or expose for the dark and blow out the whites. Or for the middle and lose them both. The reality is that sometimes a compromise must be made as to which is more important. So, in this case spot meter the white bird and let the "blacks" take care of themselves. My .02 cents

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Feb 17, 2019 20:16:21   #
via the lens (a regular here)
 
moosus wrote:
I was wondering what I could've done, on-site and in-camera, to keep from burning out the whites in the Flamingos so that I wouldn't have to deal with this issue in PP. I shot this pic with my Nikon D7200, 1/2000 sec., f/6.3, ISO 8000 and at 240mm on my Nikon 18-300mm f3.5/6.3. I usually use the E/V button and stop the exp. down one or two stops but, might this be an ETTR situation? Informative suggestions will be appreciated but please, leave the snarkasm home. And yeah, I've watched YT concerning ETTR. MM
I was wondering what I could've done, on-site and ... (show quote)


Others have commented on the camera settings. This looks like a shot where you might have had ample time to contemplate it but perhaps you were in a hurry. I am assuming it was hand-held since your shutter speed was so high. Also, when I looked closely at it nothing was in focus but maybe this was your intent? When shooting a group of animals it helps to determine which animal you want to focus on, which should normally be the animal closet to the camera and you since this is where the viewer's eye will most likely go. Try to find a group that will work from a viewing perspective. When shooting white put your focus/exposure point right on the white, the lightest part of the image, and expose for that. You can bring up the shadows in processing as needed. You know how to use EC and once you set your exposure on the lightest part you can use EC to correct as needed.

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