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IS VR OS whatever
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Feb 9, 2019 20:10:37   #
boberic (a regular here)
 
Is IS obviated by fast 1/400 shutter speed, and therefore might as well be off? And/or at what speeds is sabilization unnecessary?

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Feb 9, 2019 20:21:12   #
PixelStan77 (a regular here)
 
boberic wrote:
Is IS obviated by fast 1/400 shutter speed, and therefore might as well be off? And/or at what speeds is sabilization unnecessary?
Stabilization is no needed on a tripod.I still use it for hand held regardless of shutter speed.

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Feb 9, 2019 20:24:36   #
BassmanBruce (a regular here)
 
I’m just tagging along because I’ve wondered the same thing.
A thought I’ve had on it though, as motion sensor and software get improved, it must vary quite a bit from one setup to another.

Edit: that’s should have said motion sensor and software technology.
Also, first it was in the lens, then some added ibis, then some combined both to work together, this has to have variations.

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Feb 9, 2019 20:27:45   #
RichardTaylor (a regular here)
 
I go by the 1/focal length (in 35mm fov terms) guide. If shooting at any faster shutter speeds I turn it off.

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Feb 9, 2019 20:43:09   #
TriX (a regular here)
 
RichardTaylor wrote:
I go by the 1/focal length (in 35mm fov terms) guide. If shooting at any faster shutter speeds I turn it off.


Me too - slows down autofocus if you’re shooting fast enough SS that it’s unnecessary to prevent blur from camera shake.

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Feb 9, 2019 23:17:36   #
CHG_CANON (a regular here)
 
What lens and camera are involved? You may find newer lenses perform better than others on tripods with Canon IS active and / or the shutterspeed is immaterial to AF performance.

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Feb 10, 2019 06:18:26   #
Largobob (a regular here)
 
CHG_CANON wrote:
What lens and camera are involved? You may find newer lenses perform better than others on tripods with Canon IS active and / or the shutterspeed is immaterial to AF performance.


I think the OP meant that IS (not shutter speed) slows down AF?

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Feb 10, 2019 07:46:46   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
boberic wrote:
Is IS obviated by fast 1/400 shutter speed, and therefore might as well be off? And/or at what speeds is sabilization unnecessary?


Whenever hand held.
So much easier to see without things jumping around especially on long telephotos.

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Feb 10, 2019 08:08:29   #
khorinek
 
My IS is always on regardless of shutter speed. I believe in fast shutter speeds to capture sharp images. That being said, IS is generally used for slower shutter speeds. When Canon says their IS will replace 2 stops of shutter speed, that means if you would shoot a subject at 1/125 shutter speed, IS will allow you to shoot at 1/100 to 1/60 or so, because it take the hand shake out of the equation. Still, I recommend shooting as fast shutter speed as your environment will allow, then slowing shutter speed when you have to and letting IS help you out.

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Feb 10, 2019 08:33:48   #
suntouched (a regular here)
 
I did a little experiment of my own recently. Usually my VR is on no matter the shutter speed. I was curious if it made a difference with VR off with high shutter speeds so one day I turned off the VR for the day. My shutter speeds were 1/1200 and > for handheld shots. I didn't notice a difference in image quality. I did not notice an increase in focus speed either - since the stabilization and focus seem to happen at the same time the VR doesn't slow the focus. Camera Nikon d7500 + Tamron 100-400 mm lens. For me the biggest danger of VR off is if I forget to turn it on again for hand held slow speeds.

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Feb 10, 2019 08:34:29   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
khorinek wrote:
My IS is always on regardless of shutter speed. I believe in fast shutter speeds to capture sharp images. That being said, IS is generally used for slower shutter speeds. When Canon says their IS will replace 2 stops of shutter speed, that means if you would shoot a subject at 1/125 shutter speed, IS will allow you to shoot at 1/100 to 1/60 or so, because it take the hand shake out of the equation. Still, I recommend shooting as fast shutter speed as your environment will allow, then slowing shutter speed when you have to and letting IS help you out.
My IS is always on regardless of shutter speed. I ... (show quote)



Some now go 4-6 stops.

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Feb 10, 2019 08:35:56   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
suntouched wrote:
I did a little experiment of my own recently. Usually my VR is on no matter the shutter speed. I was curious if it made a difference with VR off with high shutter speeds so one day I turned off the VR for the day. My shutter speeds were 1/1200 and > for handheld shots. I didn't notice a difference in image quality. I did not notice an increase in focus speed either - since the stabilization and focus seem to happen at the same time the VR doesn't slow the focus. Camera Nikon d7500 + Tamron 100-400 mm lens.
I did a little experiment of my own recently. Usua... (show quote)



I bet on long lenses you sure noticed the extra shake as you tried to compose.
That is what I like about IS.

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Feb 10, 2019 08:48:51   #
davidrb
 
boberic wrote:
Is IS obviated by fast 1/400 shutter speed, and therefore might as well be off? And/or at what speeds is sabilization unnecessary?


Canon's engineers tell us to turn the IS to OFF when attaching and detaching a lens.

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Feb 10, 2019 09:02:14   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
boberic wrote:
And/or at what speeds is stabilization unnecessary?


That depends. Shooting at a high shutter speed will usually take care of vibration/shaking. If you're shooting in an unusually shaking situation, VR/OS/IS will help. If I'm holding the camera, I leave VR turned on.

http://www.slrphotographyguide.com/vr-is/
https://photographylife.com/proof-that-vibration-reduction-should-first-be-stabilized
https://www.colesclassroom.com/what-is-vibration-reduction-do-i-need-it/

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Feb 10, 2019 09:37:41   #
camerapapi (a regular here)
 
If you are using high shutter speeds, lets say twice the focal length of your lens (like 1/400sec. for a 200mm focal length.) VR is not a necessity and it might as well be off.
It is with slower shutter speeds, below the focal length of the lens that VR is useful but to a certain extent depending on camera or lens.
Most modern VR are good for 4 shutter speeds below the focal length of the lens.

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