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Camera settings
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Dec 20, 2018 09:56:46   #
BOB WETHERELL
 
Can someone please advise me of a go to book for camera settings giving advice depending on conditions? Thanks!

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Dec 20, 2018 10:01:36   #
jlocke
 
Always a good bet is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. You can usually find it on Amazon.

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Dec 20, 2018 10:02:45   #
BOB WETHERELL
 
Thank you!

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Dec 20, 2018 10:02:47   #
orrie smith
 
BOB WETHERELL wrote:
Can someone please advise me of a go to book for camera settings giving advice depending on conditions? Thanks!


google and you tube, both free and very useful for what you are needing.

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Dec 20, 2018 10:09:45   #
marine73
 
Start with your camera manual. Then there is all kinds of third party books, some are brand and camera specific others are generic. I am here don't think there is a book that will give you camera settings depending on conditions as conditions change minute by minute.

The best way is to go and experiment with different settings and making note of the settings and conditions. If you forget to note your settings they can be retrieved from EXIF data. At a minum make a note of the conditions.

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Dec 20, 2018 10:35:09   #
Tom Daniels
 
If you just have the basics of what each setting does put
your camera on a tripod in your backyard or a street.
Have some things in the viewfinder or screen.
an object some nature a person if possible.
Start playing with aperture, ISO, white balance,
shutter etc. Have cameraset to manual operation.
Try autofocus, manual etc.
I realize some will say you didnt set up the basics
you can look in the manual and reset camera
to factory settings.
Then got to youtube and search for help with your
camera settings on your cell phone or iPad.
Amazing as a resource. And
play around some more.
When you take shots you will see what
you get and start to learn making adjustments.
That doesn't say you cant
use automatic when you need to.
Take shots and look at them.
Some will say read the manual.
Good for basic setup where is the on
button and shutter. And their are good
books that you should read after getting
to know your camera.
Good luck.

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Dec 20, 2018 10:38:24   #
IDguy (a regular here)
 
jlocke wrote:
Always a good bet is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. You can usually find it on Amazon.


Best recommendation.

BUT more important than conditions, which suggests location and environment drive settings, is the question of what story do you want tell tell? That answer drives when and where you should be to create the image you want. For that I recommend Bryan Peterson’s Learning to See Creatively.

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Dec 20, 2018 11:08:58   #
BOB WETHERELL
 
Thanks for the advice

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Dec 20, 2018 11:10:22   #
BOB WETHERELL
 
Thank you!

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Dec 20, 2018 13:43:36   #
repleo (a regular here)
 
jlocke wrote:
Always a good bet is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. You can usually find it on Amazon.



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Dec 20, 2018 16:26:03   #
BOB WETHERELL
 
Got it, thanks!

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Dec 20, 2018 17:02:24   #
G Brown
 
Unless you want lists and lists of settings - I am afraid you just have to go out and learn how your camera works.
Some camera have a sliding scale in the viewfinder that suggests under or over exposure, some actually show the appearance of that aperture so that you can dial in +- until it looks ok
If still wrong, exposure is one of the simple things to post process UNLESS you got it totally wrong... Same with shutter speed.....being too slow is a blurry problem and being too fast can create a softness rather than a sharpness.

There is no 'correct' image.....someone will always find fault. So do not worry about it....You can often take 5 images of the same thing with different settings.....pick the best and bin the rest (on the PC not in camera) Then realise WHY one was best. But then tomorrow is a new day with different subjects and different light. You have to think for yourself.

Or use auto and read the suggested settings (for a mid range image) then decide what you want to exaggerate or mitigate....by speed or by distance or by light or by tripod. Then go for it. It is your image......if you do not like it -do it again with different settings until you do.

It sounds hit and miss, and if you are just snapping away without thinking beyond 'thats nice' It will always be........so look at other peoples work and explore the extremes that people push 'exposure'. Half black images with a small subject apparently highlighted. Overexposed misty dawn landscapes, High Key or Low key images.... you have a choices...stop trying to be 'correct'.

have fun

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Dec 21, 2018 05:29:43   #
Manglesphoto (a regular here)
 
jlocke wrote:
Always a good bet is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. You can usually find it on Amazon.


Then EXPERIMENT, EXPERIMENT, EXPERIMENT, IT's free

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Dec 21, 2018 06:57:27   #
traderjohn (a regular here)
 
jlocke wrote:
Always a good bet is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. You can usually find it on Amazon.


You are right. On the cover of the copy I have, he clearly states you can take great pictures with any camera.

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Dec 21, 2018 07:33:54   #
ggenova64
 
David Busch's camera guides.

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