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Camera settings
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Dec 21, 2018 07:34:15   #
Jimmy T (a regular here)
 
Bryon Peterson's book should be your first stop, then experiment, experiment, experiment, experiment. Now get out there and shoot something, grin!!!
jlocke wrote:
Always a good bet is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. You can usually find it on Amazon.



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Dec 21, 2018 08:34:11   #
pithydoug
 
orrie smith wrote:
google and you tube, both free and very useful for what you are needing.


True, but Peterson's book is clear and concise all in one. For the few bucks it costs, it's worth every cent! Sure you can find tons of videos on youtube but for a beginner you really don't know where to start viewing.

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Dec 21, 2018 08:44:05   #
ggenova64
 
Peterson's book on Exposure? what version?

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Dec 21, 2018 08:49:29   #
pithydoug
 
ggenova64 wrote:
Peterson's book on Exposure? what version?


It's on the Fourth.

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Dec 21, 2018 09:00:11   #
ggenova64
 
Thanks, buy the Fourth Edition?

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Dec 21, 2018 09:01:12   #
BOB WETHERELL
 
I found a copy and have begun reading it.
Thanks!

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Dec 21, 2018 09:18:43   #
JohnH3
 
I second that suggestion. The book is a great resource.

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Dec 21, 2018 10:03:13   #
olemikey (a regular here)
 
Until a book arrives: Shoot a handful of scenes in "AUTO" and "CHIMP" (review the pic data on settings the camera chose) each shot to see what settings the camera chose, then switch to "MANUAL", shoot the same scenes one at a time and "CHIMP", look at each pic and compare to the "AUTO" pic, and make minor adjustments to shutter speed, aperture, metering and anything else you want to try. This will not hurt anything, and you may start to learn what the camera is doing when it uses auto, and it will give you some idea of what the settings are doing to the intended image. I know this is very simplistic, but if I had a camera (and no manual or tutorial) I'd do it (actually I have, as I buy used gear a lot, and they are sometimes minus the manual), and I do have enough experience that I can usually figure out any camera I pick up. Some bodies also have "help" or internal tutorial guides that may help. If a general photography education is needed, then you have some studying to do, look into some videos short term as you may find out a lot of what you are looking for there.... then read, read, read.

Download the manual for your camera, watch some youtube videos on the subject, go to the local library and check into some photo books, etc. etc. Darrell Young, David Busch, Steve Perry (on this site a lot) and others have written great tutorials. Ebay often has many books and manuals related to photography and/or specific cameras, at near garage sale prices sometimes.

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Dec 21, 2018 10:42:07   #
Silverman
 
BOB WETHERELL wrote:
Can someone please advise me of a go to book for camera settings giving advice depending on conditions? Thanks!


You can read all the Books and Videos you want, they may add knowledge, but the best Teacher is " Hands-On-Experience", put your camera in your Hands and Practice, Practice, Practice, what you read & watch.

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Dec 21, 2018 10:50:01   #
OviedoPhotos
 
The one thing that I like about digital is you can see the impacts of settings changes right after you take the photo. The camera manual that comes with the unit are mostly garbage and are very tiny to read. Grab two books read them, try out the settings and then pick a mode that is most appealing to you. For example in Nikon I mostly shoot in aperture priority, where I set the F stop and the camera picks the shutter speed. My 2nd choice is manual mode depending on conditions.

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Dec 21, 2018 10:53:16   #
James R
 
jlocke wrote:
Always a good bet is "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. You can usually find it on Amazon.


YES!

Bryan is a Very good guy and makes it very easy to know how to operate ANY camera.

https://www.amazon.com/Understanding-Exposure-Fourth-Photographs-Camera/dp/1607748509/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1545407552&sr=8-1&keywords=underatanding+exposure

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Dec 21, 2018 11:13:57   #
GrandmaG (a regular here)
 
BOB WETHERELL wrote:
Can someone please advise me of a go to book for camera settings giving advice depending on conditions? Thanks!


My first DSLR was a Nikon D5000. When I was ready to get out of AUTO, I read Bryan Peterson’s book. Excellent as others have mentioned. The SECOND thing I did was buy Darrell Young’s book, “Understanding the Nikon D5000”. I sat down with the book and camera and learned what every button and menu item did. The manual was totally useless because there is no explanation as to what options to choose and why.

Then I went out and practiced. At first my pictures were worse, so if that happens to you, don’t get discouraged. Keep practicing! Some advice I got was to go out every day and take pictures around your house at different times of day to learn about light. It helps to keep a journal, too.

When I worked in a research lab, we had to write EVERYTHING down. Treat learning to take great pictures as a research project! It’s not a fast process, but you will get better with practice.

Now I shoot in Manual most of the time. I’ve upgraded my camera twice and I’m still learning. I use a Nikon D500 and better lenses now and I continue to research better techniques.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

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Dec 21, 2018 11:14:25   #
BurghByrd
 
In addition to the many options mentioned here you might also consider the National Geographic "Great Courses" series on photography. It covers basics of exposure in addition to suggestions about equipment, creating photographs under different conditions, different subjects etc. I hope this fits what you were looking for and enjoy the trip.

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Dec 21, 2018 11:29:28   #
autofocus
 
BOB WETHERELL wrote:
Can someone please advise me of a go to book for camera settings giving advice depending on conditions? Thanks!


I don't want to over simplify things here, but there's no magic here, and no substitute for actually doing it. Photography is all about light, and being able to read that light, as in the quantity, quality, direction, and color of light will be what you will need to know about before you consider exposure settings in different conditions. Sure, a book or a video will tell you that, but only you can master that by actual practice. Learn that, and the rest will come easy.
For starters, even without your camera, and as you roam around, start looking at "the light." Where is it coming from, direct or indirect, overhead, or low? Is it filtered, soft, overcast light, or very strong..from a small light source? (BTW, the sun is a small hard light source) Take note of shadows at different times of day.
Once you think you have a handle on that, go out and do some shooting in various light conditions, and remember, it's not just about exposure settings, but as much as the impact that the different light has on various subjects

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Dec 21, 2018 11:51:16   #
scsdesphotography
 
BOB WETHERELL wrote:
Can someone please advise me of a go to book for camera settings giving advice depending on conditions? Thanks!


As usual all the suggestions here are good. But if you want straight and concise answers to your question, then do yourself a favor and check out Scott Kelby's series of short, well written books "Digital Photography." Spend 30 minutes with the first book and your confidence in getting your camera settings right will increase immensely.

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