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May 2, 2016 09:01:31   #
Robertl594
 
Shutter speed! Boost you ISO and watch your aperture. You can deal with noise later with software.

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May 2, 2016 09:13:56   #
thelazya
 
First off, switch raw to the CF card, use shutter priority, Use either of the lenses, they are fast focus enough. Make sure you have the High speed shutter speed selected, not the silent mode. Haroldross and LFingar have you on the right path.

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May 2, 2016 09:33:26   #
SteveR (a regular here)
 
Just wondering...is RAW really necessary with sports?

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May 2, 2016 10:17:29   #
cjc2 (a regular here)
 
There is lots of mis-information above, along with some good suggestions. I'll try not to add to the bad stuff by holding any specific comments as I'm a Nikon guy, not a Canon guy. In that regard, Sharpshooter (SS) can be of help. But some basics. Like anything else, you get what you pay for. Stay away from the cheapo cards -- they are not equal. I use ONLY Lexar cards, but SanDisk is just as good, IMHO. Shooting in Continuous High (what Nikon calls it) is not meant to be a "spray and pray" mode, you still need some skill, perhaps more. Skill comes from only one thing -- practice! So go out and shoot, shoot and shoot some more. Read your manual, carefully and thoroughly, and enough times so that you have instant recall of what's needed to do what you want. Many things affect shooting speed, all of which are in the manual. When you think you understand, go out and photograph kids playing baseball. Try to get them when the ball just touches the bat and when the slide into second. Both great shots that take practice. Personally, I shoot ONLY raw, making Jpegs in LightRoom if needed. I could go on and on here. Just remember that understanding you camera, how it works and how to control it is the first step. Best of luck

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May 2, 2016 11:37:54   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
SteveR wrote:
Just wondering...is RAW really necessary with sports?


I'd say for reporting, no, but for producing a beautiful image or two, why not? Shooting lots of frames at once is the drawback for raw - too much data to process and save quickly. I don't do a lot of continuous shooting, but when I have done it, I never shot for so long that the cameras couldn't keep up (in raw).

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May 2, 2016 11:44:25   #
speters (a regular here)
 
avery48 wrote:
I could use some assistance from more veteran photographers. I shoot with a Canon 5D Mark 3 and am trying to improve on sports photography (grandsons in sports). When I want to shoot continuous frames in an event, I can only muster up a two or three fps. I know that camera can do better. What do I need to set to get maximum fps? Any help would be greatly appreciated. I use Lexar 800x 16 gig CF and Transcend 32 gig 90mb/s 600x SD cards typically, if that makes any difference.

d.

Check in the manual, you have several options in continouis shooting, set it to HS and then you shoot at 6fps!

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May 2, 2016 12:01:30   #
cjc2 (a regular here)
 
jerryc41 wrote:
I'd say for reporting, no, but for producing a beautiful image or two, why not? Shooting lots of frames at once is the drawback for raw - too much data to process and save quickly. I don't do a lot of continuous shooting, but when I have done it, I never shot for so long that the cameras couldn't keep up (in raw).


Probably the reason that I shoot sports with Dx cameras! Right now, D4s and D3, soon D5 and ??! I always shoot raw, and I never have an issue because of the large buffers and fast (now XQD 2933x) cards!

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May 2, 2016 12:18:57   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
cjc2 wrote:
Probably the reason that I shoot sports with Dx cameras! Right now, D4s and D3, soon D5 and ??! I always shoot raw, and I never have an issue because of the large buffers and fast (now XQD 2933x) cards!


Yes, if the OP had a 1DX MII he would be zipping along at 16 FPS with his hyper fast CFast cards with no problem.
The 5D MIII is not intended for hyper action and I doubt the OP wants to acquire the fastest DSLR, mentioned above, available unless they just have $6,000 laying around.
We are working within the parameters of the equipment available to them and trying to help, not brag about all the expensive crap we might own.
Many good suggestions but try reading the manual, experiment as suggested, and unless you need RAW for a specific purpose try shooting just JPEG as the sports pros do.

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May 2, 2016 12:54:01   #
cjc2 (a regular here)
 
Architect1776 wrote:
Yes, if the OP had a 1DX MII he would be zipping along at 16 FPS with his hyper fast CFast cards with no problem.
The 5D MIII is not intended for hyper action and I doubt the OP wants to acquire the fastest DSLR, mentioned above, available unless they just have $6,000 laying around.
We are working within the parameters of the equipment available to them and trying to help, not brag about all the expensive crap we might own.
Many good suggestions but try reading the manual, experiment as suggested, and unless you need RAW for a specific purpose try shooting just JPEG as the sports pros do.
Yes, if the OP had a 1DX MII he would be zipping a... (show quote)


Understood, but that's why I quoted the poster as I was answering him. I am a sports pro, and I shoot in raw almost always as well as raw plus upon occasion. I apologize for having the high end stuff!
:lol:

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May 2, 2016 13:39:32   #
wilsondl2
 
SteveR wrote:
Just wondering...is RAW really necessary with sports?


Most of the pros do not think so. - Dave

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May 2, 2016 13:45:53   #
Jer
 
I'm a newspaper sport photographer.

I have your setup.
Make sure you are set for the high frame rate. Someone else mentioned that was probably the problem.

My camera is set in raw, continuous focus, 100 iso up to 12000, as low as 1/25 sec. (I just tested it at that, I don't use in it in the field).

So my camera is setup as many have told you not to do. So that's not the problem. Check your frame rate. You can see it in the lcd viewer on the top of your camera. It should have what looks like overlapping squares. Make sure you are in what Canon calls "silent" mode.

I don't know what sport you are shooting but depending on the situation you don't need high fps all the time. Strangely enough sometimes you won't get the shot you were hoping for. For example, I was taking photos of a horse race for a personal project. I got parts of horses, gaps and photos that were not framed correctly. I would have been better off shooting single frame. What I tell young photographers is that the first shot in a multi-frame shooting should be the one you want and the others are back ups. Also, the 5dm3 allows you to adjust your focus speed.

If you ever shoot for a publication you may have a very tight deadline. You can't afford to be overly generous with fps usage.

The other thing is to learn the sport you are shooting. That will help some in getting better photos. You will know generally where the action is going.

Also, some sports photos aren't of the action. Look for slice of life photos. For example, a coach talking to a player, a group of players or fans watching the game.

Remember it takes time to learn the ins and outs. Be patient while working to improve.

Ok, one last thing. in sports that involve flying objects...never take you eyes off the action. Make sure the object is not flying around between plays. More photographers have been hit when the turned away and didn't notice a player who missed catching it and you get hit.

Also, some of my best photos were when I only had a chance to take once shot....like a hockey goal shot where the goalie blocked the puck. The puck had just hit the stick and ice was flying. Neat shot. Sometimes it pays to be lucky rather than good. But in reality you make your own luck by being prepared.

good luck

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May 2, 2016 14:19:32   #
Vince
 
A segment from the dpreview of that camera indicates buffer might be limiting you in RAW. See the performance(speed) section of the review. It is very detailed and addresses your questions.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canon-eos-5d-mark-iii

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May 2, 2016 15:42:15   #
mas24 (a regular here)
 
Architect1776 wrote:
Yes, if the OP had a 1DX MII he would be zipping along at 16 FPS with his hyper fast CFast cards with no problem.
The 5D MIII is not intended for hyper action and I doubt the OP wants to acquire the fastest DSLR, mentioned above, available unless they just have $6,000 laying around.
We are working within the parameters of the equipment available to them and trying to help, not brag about all the expensive crap we might own.
Many good suggestions but try reading the manual, experiment as suggested, and unless you need RAW for a specific purpose try shooting just JPEG as the sports pros do.
Yes, if the OP had a 1DX MII he would be zipping a... (show quote)


I came in contact last year with a pro photographer who shot NFL games with the Canon 1DX. He shot JPEG. The prints in his portfolio from a past game were breathtaking.

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May 2, 2016 16:13:47   #
whitewolfowner
 
Avery:

I am not familiar with your camera (I shoot with Nikon cameras) but each camera has a maximum number of frames per second that it will shoot. Being a sports photographer myself I have found that no matter how many frames per second a camera will shoot, no matter what you do, the shot you want will always fall in between your shots.

The best way to get the shot you want (unless you are seeking a sequence of the act-then rapid fire is the way to go) is to know the sport well enough that you know what is coming before it happens and be in position for the shot. You have to know the lapse time of your camera and time the single frame for the shot you want. It takes practice but with time you will find that you can freeze a baseball on the bat, a basketball on the rim etc... All the great sports photographers get their shots that way. It won't get it every time but with experience ad practice you will get more and more often. Fire away, putting a shot on a flash card is free. In the olden days, we went through a lot of film and still never came close to shooting as many frames as we do today, so enjoy the advantage today's technology brings.

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May 2, 2016 16:38:22   #
Architect1776 (a regular here)
 
mas24 wrote:
I came in contact last year with a pro photographer who shot NFL games with the Canon 1DX. He shot JPEG. The prints in his portfolio from a past game were breathtaking.


An interesting article on this jpeg vs raw issue that will help the op see what happens.
http://scottkelby.com/confessions-of-a-jpeg-shooter/

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