Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
a real pistil...
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Feb 22, 2012 21:55:40   #
LoneRangeFinder Loc: Left field
 
Hope you enjoy. ISO 200 with fill flash, Nikkor 105-mm at MFD (1:1), 1-sec at f/8.



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Feb 22, 2012 22:37:14   #
Nikonian72 Loc: Long Beach CA
 
Excellent job! Especially positioning camera, so narrow DOF carries stamens & anthers with pollen, left & right, as well as center pistil.

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Feb 23, 2012 08:56:35   #
MJL Loc: Wild Rose, Wisconsin
 
Very Nice!

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Feb 23, 2012 09:25:41   #
tinusbum Loc: east texas
 
i like that one a lot.good job! tom

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Feb 23, 2012 17:20:55   #
Bmac Loc: Long Island, NY
 
Stumptowner wrote:
Hope you enjoy. ISO 200 with fill flash, Nikkor 105-mm at MFD (1:1), 1-sec at f/8.


Nice composition, color, lighting and background. 8-)

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Feb 23, 2012 18:41:17   #
Bunny-Jean Loc: Wisconsin
 
WOW! That is excellent!!!!!!

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Feb 23, 2012 20:18:56   #
LoneRangeFinder Loc: Left field
 
Thanks to all for viewing.

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Feb 24, 2012 15:08:48   #
tramsey Loc: Texas
 
First great shot of a pistil, detail in unbelievable.

Now here is where the world finds out just how much of a newbie I am and how little I know about photography, even though I have read numerous books this pictures brings up questions for me. I guess the biggest is DOF. I read that to have a good DOF the subject had to be distant from the background and the camera a good distance from the subject. Here things just seem to be the opposite we are inside a flower with great DOF. I understand that DOF has to have a small f stop here we have f/8 which is pretty wide I thought. Than one second? Why isn't the whole picture nothing but one big blur? The only thing I understand is the ISO at 200 that makes sense; the rest ... what did I do wrong, read the books backwards?

Where am I going wrong? I have a tough hide so just be candid.

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Feb 24, 2012 15:27:06   #
photophly Loc: Old Bridge NJ
 
Stumptowner wrote:
Hope you enjoy. ISO 200 with fill flash, Nikkor 105-mm at MFD (1:1), 1-sec at f/8.


Super shot....love the fill lighting.

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Feb 24, 2012 18:30:12   #
Wabbit Loc: Arizona Desert
 
tramsey wrote:
First great shot of a pistil, detail in unbelievable.

Now here is where the world finds out just how much of a newbie I am and how little I know about photography, even though I have read numerous books this pictures brings up questions for me. I guess the biggest is df. I read that to have a good df the subject had to be distant from the background and the camera a good distance from the subject. Here things just seem to be the opposite we are inside a flower with great df. I understand that df has to have a small f stop here we have f/8 which is pretty wide I thought. Than one second? Why isn't the whole picture nothing but one big blur? The only thing I understand is the ISO at 200 that makes sense; the rest ... what did I do wrong, read the books backwards?

Where am I going wrong? I have a tough hide so just be candid.
First great shot of a pistil, detail in unbelievab... (show quote)


Candid ..... OK, I'll give you candid ...... you haven't read the right book yet

Depth of field is the area in front of and/or in back of your intended subject that is relatively still in focus.

The amount of depth of field is determined by the aperture you choose, and we're talking SLR (DX) here not point n shoot small sensor cameras.

At f8 if your depth of field is 20 feet you can position your subject wherever you want, you've got 20 feet to play with.

Now that's the scheme of things for "general photography".

"Macro is a different ball game"

Macro is like using a magnifying glass. Depth of field for general photography changes drastically with a lens in Macro mode.

That same f8 in Macro mode may only give you 1/8th of an inch or maybe less. This is why most Macro photography is shot at f11 or smaller like f22.

F2.8 in general photography will give you a depth of field of maybe 4 feet. Turn on the Macro and you've got 1/32nd of an inch, maybe.

Tell me if I'm loosing you.

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Feb 24, 2012 20:09:24   #
tramsey Loc: Texas
 
No, surprisingly I'm right with you. I didn't know that about macro photgraphy but you're making sense. Anything else you could help me with on this?

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Feb 24, 2012 20:15:28   #
Wabbit Loc: Arizona Desert
 
tramsey wrote:
No, surprisingly I'm right with you. I didn't know that about macro photgraphy but you're making sinse. Anything else you could help me with on this?


What camera and lens are you using?

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Feb 24, 2012 20:23:25   #
tramsey Loc: Texas
 
I have an old bridge camera Lumix FZ20

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Feb 24, 2012 21:21:25   #
Wabbit Loc: Arizona Desert
 
tramsey wrote:
I have an old bridge camera Lumix FZ20


Oh, easy, thought we were talking SLR

You have more depth of field at 2.8 with your Panasonic than you would with a SLR.

I'm not familiar with Panasonic But I'm sure I can figure it out

There should be a Macro mode. It'll say Macro or there will be a flower symbol. You may be able to engage Macro in conjunction with another program like shutter priority. Like I said I'm not familiar with Panasonic but I'm sure there will be a Macro mode there somewhere.

This mode may automatically choose the aperture for you. And if it does it will most likely choose f8. F8 on your camera will give you more depth of field than you'd have with a SLR at f22

If Macro mode lets you choose the aperture, for this test choose 2.8 because this will allow for a faster shutter speed. The faster the shutter speed the less chance of blur due to camera shake or blur from your subject moving.

Set your ISO to the lowest number your camera has, should be around 100. Do not use automatic ISO if that's an option. Low ISO gives you a prettier picture, less noise.

Turn off your flash, the inboard flash can be used but that takes more settings to play around with. Way too easy to blow out the highlights with flash when shooting Macro.

Now, for macro photography "No camera movement" is very important. A tripod or a stationary object to hold your camera is a must. It doesn't matter what you want to photograph just pick something tiny.

You want some decent lighting and you can position your camera on a table a few inches away from your subject.

Look closely when your camera focuses. You can't get too close but you want to be close enough to focus properly. You want to make sure you're using spot focus, where your focus point is in the center of your lens. For Macro you're only using the center of your lens

Let me know how this works out.

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Feb 25, 2012 00:07:45   #
tinosa Loc: Grand Rapids Michigan
 
ring wrote:
tramsey wrote:
I have an old bridge camera Lumix FZ20
Oh, easy, thought we were talking SLR
You have more depth of field at 2.8 with your Panasonic than you would with a SLR.
I'm not familiar with Panasonic But I'm sure I can figure it out
There should be a Macro mode. It'll say Macro or there will be a flower symbol. You may be able to engage Macro in conjunction with another program like shutter priority. Like I said I'm not familiar with Panasonic but I'm sure there will be a Macro mode there somewhere.
This mode may automatically choose the aperture for you. And if it does it will most likely choose f8. F8 on your camera will give you more depth of field than you'd have with a SLR at f22
If Macro mode lets you choose the aperture, for this test choose 2.8 because this will allow for a faster shutter speed. The faster the shutter speed the less chance of blur due to camera shake or blur from your subject moving.
Set your ISO to the lowest number your camera has, should be around 100. Do not use automatic ISO if that's an option. Low ISO gives you a prettier picture, less noise.
Turn off your flash, the inboard flash can be used but that takes more settings to play around with. Way too easy to blow out the highlights with flash when shooting Macro.
Now, for macro photography "No camera movement" is very important. A tripod or a stationary object to hold your camera is a must. It doesn't matter what you want to photograph just pick something tiny.
You want some decent lighting and you can position your camera on a table a few inches away from your subject.
Look closely when your camera focuses. You can't get too close but you want to be close enough to focus properly. You want to make sure you're using spot focus, where your focus point is in the center of your lens. For Macro you're only using the center of your lens
Let me know how this works out.
quote=tramsey I have an old bridge camera Lumix F... (show quote)
I like to play with macro on My Panasonic FZ 30 pretty much identical to the FZ 20.

With the selector switch on the zoom lens in AF Macro mode you can get up to 5 cm with the zoom wide open (1x)
Aperture, Shutter priority, and manual are all available in this mode.

I like to attach the screw-on Nikon 6T diopter to get in closer.

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