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Black Rapid strap failure?
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Jun 12, 2013 16:25:48   #
Dbl00buk Loc: Orlando
 
I bought a Black Rapid RS – 7 and have been using it for about 3 months. While resting on a bench in a theme park with my D800 and the Black Rapid attached, another photog enthusiasts sat next to me. He asked me how I liked the strap and I responded with very favorable comments. He mentioned to me that he also bought the same strap, but heard of tripod attachment failures, whereas the camera body connecting plate, buckled under the load. Since I'm not familiar with the anatomy of the D 800 and its bottom connection points in relation to the tripod screw does this sound possible? On another forum, a member contacted Nikon regarding this issue and they highly recommended not using the tripod screw mount for anything other than a tripod.

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Jun 12, 2013 16:45:54   #
lorenww Loc: St. Petersburg
 
Screws can come loose, I feel much more safe using a clip on the strap lugs.

I personally would not feel safe carrying my camera around by a single screw that could work its way loose.

I have a safety loop attached from my tripod to the camera strap lugs just for safety.

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Jun 12, 2013 18:06:38   #
MT Shooter Loc: Montana
 
I always advise everyone to NEVER mount their camera body to any strap via the tripod socket. It was never designed for that purpose and really should never be used for it.
That said, I do sell such straps in my store, specifically those designed for carrying two cameras at once, but I only sell them with the recommendation to use them only on the tripod collar of lenses that have that feature, never on the camera body.

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Jun 12, 2013 18:50:59   #
Tea8 Loc: One of those little dots in Oklahoma
 
MT Shooter wrote:
I always advise everyone to NEVER mount their camera body to any strap via the tripod socket. It was never designed for that purpose and really should never be used for it.
That said, I do sell such straps in my store, specifically those designed for carrying two cameras at once, but I only sell them with the recommendation to use them only on the tripod collar of lenses that have that feature, never on the camera body.


It's true he never recommends that and several of us have kept that in mine when looking for a strap. But then again to each their own. I don't plan on using one that uses the tripod socket, but several here have had no problems with them ever. And then again some here have had problems and have been out looking for a new camera. Anyway it's your choice really.

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Jun 12, 2013 19:54:25   #
Hankwt Loc: kingsville ontario
 
while not disputing MT s advice which i always appreciate
i started a thread on this to see how many members actually had this happen -
www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-121191-1.html

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Jun 12, 2013 20:05:40   #
Annie_Girl Loc: It's none of your business
 
One of the gentleman in my camera club had the mounting mechanism fail on his black rapid strap, sent his 5dMkII to the ground. It was during one of our photography field trips and more than a dozen of use saw it happen and stood there frozen in shock and fear.

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Jun 12, 2013 20:27:30   #
MT Shooter Loc: Montana
 
Annie_Girl wrote:
One of the gentleman in my camera club had the mounting mechanism fail on his black rapid strap, sent his 5dMkII to the ground. It was during one of our photography field trips and more than a dozen of use saw it happen and stood there frozen in shock and fear.


Not a matter of "if", its a matter of "when".

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Jun 12, 2013 20:39:39   #
Wahawk Loc: NE IA
 
lorenww wrote:
Screws can come loose, I feel much more safe using a clip on the strap lugs.

I personally would not feel safe carrying my camera around by a single screw that could work its way loose.

I have a safety loop attached from my tripod to the camera strap lugs just for safety.


:thumbup: :thumbup:
I would never use the tripod socket as a primary strap connection, only as a secondary stabalizing point while relying on the mfgs strap lugs/loops for the primary connection and weight bearing points.

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Jun 12, 2013 21:33:50   #
preachy Loc: Dover Plains, NY
 
I use a hardened steel L-Bracket (RRS) on my MkII. I'm pretty comfortable using the tripod socket on the bracket, but most of my work is done from a tripod anyhoo, so....

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Jun 12, 2013 21:35:47   #
Bruce with a Canon Loc: Islip
 
MT SHOOTER is wise and insightful!

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Jun 12, 2013 22:47:05   #
BHC Loc: Strawberry Valley, JF, USA
 
I agree with MT Shooter with one possible minor exception. I shoot a light μ4/3 camera with a light lens. I use a BlackRapid R-7 attached to the tripod socket. I have tried a safety loop to the strap lugs, but it gets in the way. I will probably use this strap for a while, and I have no concerns as long as I remember to check the screw tension frequently. I may soon be able to begin using a DRLR or another heavier camera again. When I do, the R-7 will be retired in favor on an OpTech sling strap or a binocular harness, per MT's advice.

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Jun 12, 2013 23:59:58   #
davidrb Loc: Hangar i13
 
MT Shooter wrote:
I always advise everyone to NEVER mount their camera body to any strap via the tripod socket. It was never designed for that purpose and really should never be used for it.
That said, I do sell such straps in my store, specifically those designed for carrying two cameras at once, but I only sell them with the recommendation to use them only on the tripod collar of lenses that have that feature, never on the camera body.


:roll: :roll: :roll: Why is this? I have seen all kinds of photographers at many events using tripod mount straps. It secures the body to the tripod, to the monopod, why not the strap?

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Jun 13, 2013 00:17:46   #
MT Shooter Loc: Montana
 
davidrb wrote:
:roll: :roll: :roll: Why is this? I have seen all kinds of photographers at many events using tripod mount straps. It secures the body to the tripod, to the monopod, why not the strap?


That could not be simpler. The manufacturers engineer the tripod socket to hold the weight of the camera in a downward, compressed fashion, with the weight of the camera "static" upon the head, same as on a monopod. The use of the camera in portrait mode puts the weight in a "shear" direction, again as the engineering intended. What the manufacturers did not intend was for the tripod socket to carry that load upside down and bouncing around all day. The "shock weight" of the camera and lens in this position when bouncing along could easily exceed 10 times the actual weight of the camera and MUCH more than the tripod socket was designed to handle in that fashion.
Depending upon the care of the owner that failure could happen soon, or it could happen later, or there is the possibility that, with proper diligence, it may never happen. But the question is, are you willing to risk your favorite expensive camera and lens on one little 1/4" screw that sells for 8 cents in the hardware store???? Not me!



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Jun 13, 2013 00:35:59   #
BHC Loc: Strawberry Valley, JF, USA
 
MT Shooter wrote:
That could not be simpler. The manufacturers engineer the tripod socket to hold the weight of the camera in a downward, compressed fashion, with the weight of the camera "static" upon the head, same as on a monopod. The use of the camera in portrait mode puts the weight in a "shear" direction, again as the engineering intended. What the manufacturers did not intend was for the tripod socket to carry that load upside down and bouncing around all day. The "shock weight" of the camera and lens in this position when bouncing along could easily exceed 10 times the actual weight of the camera and MUCH more than the tripod socket was designed to handle in that fashion.
Depending upon the care of the owner that failure could happen soon, or it could happen later, or there is the possibility that, with proper diligence, it may never happen. But the question is, are you willing to risk your favorite expensive camera and lens on one little 1/4" screw that sells for 8 cents in the hardware store???? Not me!
That could not be simpler. The manufacturers engin... (show quote)

That brings us to another aspect of the use of these devices. Some people put them on and spend a day engaged in all types of activities: walking, running, sitting, bending over, crawling. And they depend on the strap as the sole protection for the camera and lens. Others see an opportunity to take a series of photographs, don the strap and then spend a finite amount of time using the rig. If they engage in any activity other than strolling, they grab the camera and hold it out of harms way. The strap is a supplemental safety device, like a neck strap or bino-harness. If the camera is allowed to hang freely, the catches are positioned to avoid sudden excessive movement. During hazardous conditions, a second strap may be used. The question, then, is do you depend on the strap as your only means of support or do you take into consideration the stresses put on your equipment and act accordingly?

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Jun 13, 2013 06:03:59   #
Festus Loc: North Dakota
 
Dbl00buk wrote:
I bought a Black Rapid RS – 7 and have been using it for about 3 months. While resting on a bench in a theme park with my D800 and the Black Rapid attached, another photog enthusiasts sat next to me. He asked me how I liked the strap and I responded with very favorable comments. He mentioned to me that he also bought the same strap, but heard of tripod attachment failures, whereas the camera body connecting plate, buckled under the load. Since I'm not familiar with the anatomy of the D 800 and its bottom connection points in relation to the tripod screw does this sound possible? On another forum, a member contacted Nikon regarding this issue and they highly recommended not using the tripod screw mount for anything other than a tripod.
I bought a Black Rapid RS – 7 and have been using ... (show quote)


I'm thinking that since this type of strap has been around for some time now, if it was save to use the tripod screw, that to save money manufacturers would quit putting the other strap holders (eyelets) on the sides of the cameras and just rely on the tripod screw. I haven't seen any manufacturer eliminate the traditional eyelets for camera straps.

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