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Some more processing on M42
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Dec 6, 2021 22:43:45   #
Ballard Loc: Grass Valley, California
 
I did a bit more de-ringing of the stars in my previous post on the gallery and a bit more enhancement of the images. Both images were taken with a full frame mono camera (ASI6200MM Pro) at gain 100 at -5 C and connected to a canon 500mm lens.
The first image was taken using Luminance , Red, Green and Blue filters . L (40 at 5ec, 42 at 30 seconds 3 at 120 seconds) R (20 at 120 seconds) G (19 at 120 seconds) B (19 at 120 seconds) Total exposure time 150 minutes. The image was processed with Pixinsight using HDR techniques to preserve the dim areas without blowing out the bright areas.
The second image was taken using 5nm Ha, O3 and S2 filter . Ha(16 at 300 seconds, 10 at 240 seconds) O3 (20 at 240 seconds) S2 (28 at 300 seconds) Total exposure time 340 minutes. The image was processed using HDR techniques in Pixinsight and combined using the Hubble Pallet (S2->Red, Ha->Green, O3->Blue). Note the background stars were subtracted out and the stars from the LRGB version were added back into this image.

The next 3 images are the stretched monochromatic images of HA, O3 and S2 respectively. Note: the differences in the shape of the nebula (including the Running man nebula to the left of M42) from these different filters. These images show were the Hydrogen, Oxygen and Sulphur ions are glowing.

Link to the original post.
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-720836-1.html

M42 using LRGB.
M42 using LRGB....
(Download)

M42 using Narrow Band filters
M42 using Narrow Band filters...
(Download)

Image taken with the Ha filter.
Image taken with the Ha filter....
(Download)

Image taken with the O3 filter.
Image taken with the O3 filter....
(Download)

Image taken with the S2 filter.
Image taken with the S2 filter....
(Download)

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Dec 6, 2021 23:57:34   #
WIHorseman
 
These are outstanding. Thanks for adding the detailed info. I have to admit I don’t understand it all but I’d love to add astrophotography to my experimentation list. Great job.

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Dec 7, 2021 02:08:44   #
Ballard Loc: Grass Valley, California
 
WIHorseman wrote:
These are outstanding. Thanks for adding the detailed info. I have to admit I don’t understand it all but I’d love to add astrophotography to my experimentation list. Great job.


Hi WIHorseman
Thanks for checking out the images of M42 and for the comment. This is a fun but additive hobby.

Reply
 
 
Dec 7, 2021 05:12:07   #
fuminous Loc: Luling, LA... for now...
 
Fantastic images, Ballard, very well done. My sentiments are much like WIHorseman's; amazed at what you do, would like to do it too... but way over my head. And... someone once said, "Beware of adventure that requires new clothes..." I suspect astro photography requires substantial new equipment... and I don't need another GAS variant...

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Dec 7, 2021 06:03:53   #
Marc G Loc: East Grinstead, West Sussex, England
 
Ballard wrote:
I did a bit more de-ringing of the stars in my previous post on the gallery and a bit more enhancement of the images. Both images were taken with a full frame mono camera (ASI6200MM Pro) at gain 100 at -5 C and connected to a canon 500mm lens.
The first image was taken using Luminance , Red, Green and Blue filters . L (40 at 5ec, 42 at 30 seconds 3 at 120 seconds) R (20 at 120 seconds) G (19 at 120 seconds) B (19 at 120 seconds) Total exposure time 150 minutes. The image was processed with Pixinsight using HDR techniques to preserve the dim areas without blowing out the bright areas.
The second image was taken using 5nm Ha, O3 and S2 filter . Ha(16 at 300 seconds, 10 at 240 seconds) O3 (20 at 240 seconds) S2 (28 at 300 seconds) Total exposure time 340 minutes. The image was processed using HDR techniques in Pixinsight and combined using the Hubble Pallet (S2->Red, Ha->Green, O3->Blue). Note the background stars were subtracted out and the stars from the LRGB version were added back into this image.

The next 3 images are the stretched monochromatic images of HA, O3 and S2 respectively. Note: the differences in the shape of the nebula (including the Running man nebula to the left of M42) from these different filters. These images show were the Hydrogen, Oxygen and Sulphur ions are glowing.

Link to the original post.
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-720836-1.html
I did a bit more de-ringing of the stars in my pre... (show quote)


Interesting comparisons mate.
The HA filter looks to have the better star shape & size thus i would use this as a separate star layer when composing the final image.
Great work

Reply
Dec 7, 2021 10:27:38   #
gekko11 Loc: Las Cruces NM
 
I agree with WI Horseman , really is outstanding ! always look forward to your posts

Reply
Dec 7, 2021 12:00:36   #
Ballard Loc: Grass Valley, California
 
fuminous wrote:
Fantastic images, Ballard, very well done. My sentiments are much like WIHorseman's; amazed at what you do, would like to do it too... but way over my head. And... someone once said, "Beware of adventure that requires new clothes..." I suspect astro photography requires substantial new equipment... and I don't need another GAS variant...


Hi fuminous
Thanks for viewing the images of the Orion nebula and for the comment. If you really get into it there is a lot of equipment you can get. However to just stick you toe in the water so speak you can use a DSLR on a tripod to take star trails and short exposures of the Milkly way. From there you can get a star tracker that mounts on a standard tripod to take exposures of a couple of minutes with a DSLR. The next step is to take multiple tracked shots and stack them with software (like deepskystacker which is freeware). Of course there is a lot of learning to go with it which I'm still doing.

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Dec 7, 2021 12:11:43   #
Ballard Loc: Grass Valley, California
 
Marc G wrote:
Interesting comparisons mate.
The HA filter looks to have the better star shape & size thus i would use this as a separate star layer when composing the final image.
Great work


Hi Marc G
Thanks for viewing the images of M42 and for the comment. The sky was a bit calmer when the HA was taken so it came out a bit better. However the best image was the Luminance from the LRGB shot so I used it has the reference to stack all the images even though the Luminance wasn't added to the narrow band shot. I have been using Pixinsight which does use Layers perse (other than for wavelet noise reduction), but does have a number of methods to mask and sharper the images. Note: I subtracted the stars from the Narrow Band image and added in the stars from the LRGB image, however this was mainly to make the color look better as Narrow Band stars look funny to me even after reducing the magenta in them.

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Dec 7, 2021 12:18:50   #
Ballard Loc: Grass Valley, California
 
gekko11 wrote:
I agree with WI Horseman , really is outstanding ! always look forward to your posts


Hi gekko11
Thanks for checking out the image of M42 and for the comment. I' glad you like them and I'm slowly learning new techniques on how to better process my images each time I do it.

Reply
Dec 7, 2021 12:21:24   #
fuminous Loc: Luling, LA... for now...
 
Ballard wrote:
Hi fuminous
Thanks for viewing the images of the Orion nebula and for the comment. If you really get into it there is a lot of equipment you can get. However to just stick you toe in the water so speak you can use a DSLR on a tripod to take star trails and short exposures of the Milkly way. From there you can get a star tracker that mounts on a standard tripod to take exposures of a couple of minutes with a DSLR. The next step is to take multiple tracked shots and stack them with software (like deepskystacker which is freeware). Of course there is a lot of learning to go with it which I'm still doing.
Hi fuminous br Thanks for viewing the images of th... (show quote)


Yup, just as I feared... first you need (after the DSLR and tripod) a tracker, camera heater, filters, timers, a copy of "Galaxies at a Glance", more RAM, bigger harddrive, longer lens, new computer, alot more smarts and a ham sandwich... I admire your expertise and hard work Ballard, but it'll be a while before I venture past 20mm, F/3.5, ISO 800 and 30 seconds.

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Dec 7, 2021 12:32:12   #
Ballard Loc: Grass Valley, California
 
fuminous wrote:
Yup, just as I feared... first you need (after the DSLR and tripod) a tracker, camera heater, filters, timers, a copy of "Galaxies at a Glance", more RAM, bigger harddrive, longer lens, new computer, alot more smarts and a ham sandwich... I admire your expertise and hard work Ballard, but it'll be a while before I venture past 20mm, F/3.5, ISO 800 and 30 seconds.


Hi fuminous. It can get addictive and expensive once you start down that rabbit hole. But it is a lot of fun and helps me kept my mind sharp now that I'm retired. My Wife's got her embroidery machines and I've got my camera and telescope stuff, I'm not sure who spends the most.

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Dec 7, 2021 12:52:51   #
Gampa
 
Very very very nice!!!

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Dec 7, 2021 13:09:09   #
Ballard Loc: Grass Valley, California
 
Gampa wrote:
Very very very nice!!!


Hi Gampa
Thanks for checking out the images of M42 and for the comment.

Reply
Dec 7, 2021 14:22:47   #
bwana Loc: Bergen, Alberta, Canada
 
Ballard wrote:
I did a bit more de-ringing of the stars in my previous post on the gallery and a bit more enhancement of the images. Both images were taken with a full frame mono camera (ASI6200MM Pro) at gain 100 at -5 C and connected to a canon 500mm lens.
The first image was taken using Luminance , Red, Green and Blue filters . L (40 at 5ec, 42 at 30 seconds 3 at 120 seconds) R (20 at 120 seconds) G (19 at 120 seconds) B (19 at 120 seconds) Total exposure time 150 minutes. The image was processed with Pixinsight using HDR techniques to preserve the dim areas without blowing out the bright areas.
The second image was taken using 5nm Ha, O3 and S2 filter . Ha(16 at 300 seconds, 10 at 240 seconds) O3 (20 at 240 seconds) S2 (28 at 300 seconds) Total exposure time 340 minutes. The image was processed using HDR techniques in Pixinsight and combined using the Hubble Pallet (S2->Red, Ha->Green, O3->Blue). Note the background stars were subtracted out and the stars from the LRGB version were added back into this image.

The next 3 images are the stretched monochromatic images of HA, O3 and S2 respectively. Note: the differences in the shape of the nebula (including the Running man nebula to the left of M42) from these different filters. These images show were the Hydrogen, Oxygen and Sulphur ions are glowing.

Link to the original post.
https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-720836-1.html
I did a bit more de-ringing of the stars in my pre... (show quote)

Narrowband filters do a great job on astro-images!

bwa

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Dec 7, 2021 16:18:15   #
Ballard Loc: Grass Valley, California
 
bwana wrote:
Narrowband filters do a great job on astro-images!

bwa


Hi bwa
Thanks for checking out the M42 images and the comment. Indeed, Narrow Band really brings out detail that LRGB doesn't always see.

Reply
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