Ugly Hedgehog - Photography Forum
Home Active Topics Newest Pictures Search Login Register
Main Photography Discussion
What advice would you offer a fellow photographer?
Page <prev 2 of 18 next> last>>
Nov 19, 2021 16:13:02   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
wide2tele wrote:
Learn the basic rules of photography and stick to them.


Very true! It's important to have a solid foundation to build upon.

Thank you!

Dodie

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:15:41   #
E.L.. Shapiro Loc: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
 
luvmypets wrote:
There are so many posts about equipment and in almost everyone, the subject of technique over equipment has come up.

If a fellow photographer came up to you and asked what would be your best piece of advice or best learning technique to improve their photography, what information would you offer them? We all know "read the manual", "practice, practice, practice" but how would you suggest they start and how should they build on that?

Dodie


The operative word in your question is "improve". Many folks believe that improvement will come with upgrading equipment and that's what there is so much conversation about gear. That ain't necessarily so. A better camera or lens may yield sharper imagery and more sophisticated automatic features may facilitate more accurate exposure and focus but there is no engineering or feature in any camera or lens that can address LIGHTING AND COMPOSITION. Those are an element that makes a photograph more impactful, story-telling and brings the viewers' eyes to the main subject of any image. Lighting sets the mood and brings a 3rd dimension to a two-dimensional sheet of paerr or a flat-screen.

I would advise folks to study the principles of light and composition, not the set rules. People will get hung up on a rule such as the rule of thirds and try an apply it to everything they shoot or that a certain kind of lighting- soft, hard, directional, flat, whatever, is the "best" way to go for specific situations. This leads to stagnation. If they study and learn the basic principles and practical physics of light they can learn to apply them in a more creative and experimental manner. Learn the mechanics and create the aesthetics. Certain basis of composition, utilization of space and format, negative space, proportions and placement of subjects are the basics so the photograph can conform or deviate from the set rules and compose as per his or her sense of expression.

In this and many other forums, the subject of light, use of light and lighting control is sourly neglected. If the basic principles are understood they can be applied to artificial and natural light, studio work and available light.

General advice like "read the manual" or "practice, practice, practice" apples to everything where skills are involved- mechanics, sports, playing a musical instrument, brain surgery, whatever! You can't get anywhere if you don't know how to operate the tools and equipment and continuing practice and learning are also essential.

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:15:49   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
quixdraw wrote:
Such a broad spectrum question - first, to provide useful input, you'd need to know the photographer, their work, and something about the challenges and frustrations they face.


I agree that it is important to know where the greatest help is needed. I left this broad so that each person could decide whether they wanted to offer broad or pointed advice.

Thank you!

Dodie

Reply
 
 
Nov 19, 2021 16:24:12   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
Soul Dr. wrote:
There are plenty of self-help photography videos on youtube that I would reccomend.
Suggest finding a mentor or offer to help if you have the time and desire to.
What helped me a lot in my photography, is experimenting with different settings, different lighting, and other various parameters.

will


For a lot of people hands on learning is the best and for others a guiding hand leads them in a direction that might have been missed. The internet is an option that can be very helpful or for some; overwhelming.

Thank you, Will!

Dodie

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:27:08   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
Bill_de wrote:
Stay clear of UHH.


---


UHH can be good or bad. In my case it's been a very good experience. I've learned a lot from many of the people here and I hope I've been able to help others.

Thanks for your comment!

Dodie

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:28:15   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
olddutch wrote:
YOUR CAMERA. Don’t leave home without it.


Excellent advice since you never know when an opportunity will present itself and you should always be ready.

Thank you!

Dodie

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:32:49   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
Just Fred wrote:
"Prepare to be disappointed." Even the best professional photographers take stinkers. The late Frank Lee Ruggles once told me that for every "good" photo he took, there were about 100 that didn't make the cut. Ansel Adams once commented that, “There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs.”


Very true!!! Every photo a photographer takes should be scrutinized for their mistakes to improve the next time. I like to post what I consider a top photo on UHH for others to find the flaws I miss.

Thank you!

Dodie

Reply
 
 
Nov 19, 2021 16:34:25   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
Ysarex wrote:
Amateurs look through their cameras and see the subject they are photographing, photographers see how that subject is lit.


Very nice!! Since photography is "painting with light" the study of light should be a top priority.

Thank you!

Dodie

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:39:20   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
Shutterbugger2 wrote:
Separate the subject from the background using:
Focus (subject in focus & background out of focus. Or the opposite.)
Texture (Eg. an egg against gravel)
Tone (Subject a different tone from background. Highlights project, shadows recede.
Color (Subject a different color from background. Cool color for background & warm color for subject.)

Create depth with overlapping planes & receding lines (like RR tracks).

Photography is communication & tells a story.

Be aware of distracting shadows, backgrounds & unwanted elements.

Usually, (Not always) the subject fills the frame.

There is a lot more that we don't have space for. Google photo composition. Have fun!
Separate the subject from the background using: br... (show quote)



Excellent advice and ideas for practice and learning!

Thank you!

Dodie

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:44:16   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
rmorrison1116 wrote:
There are two photographer/authors who's books I would recommend as must read, neither of which, to the best of my knowledge, are posters on UHH. If one follows their books, then learning photography should be quite easy. Being good at it is something different. Both authors are big proponents of, practice, practice, practice, and learn your camera.


Would you care to share the names of the authors/photographers and the title(s) of the books you find most helpful?

Having the knowledge of how to do something and being able to do are can be difficult for some...me for one. I sometimes feel my brain and hands and not connected.

Thank you!

Dodie

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:46:22   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
wdross wrote:
Photo clubs (a good one with members that share), workshops / seminars, and books / articles.


A very good suggestion to join a club where you can find someone to work with you. All good ideas!!

Thank you!

Dodie

Reply
 
 
Nov 19, 2021 16:48:59   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
User ID wrote:
Leave your camera at home much more often, more often than bringing it, so as to liberate your vision from your device.

With no camera, watch for subjects and scenes anyway. Don’t merely look and identify likely scenes. Mentally work the images to completion, camerawork AND post. It’s easier to learn to see without the distraction of operating the camera, and without intentions of pleasing any critics other than yourself.

You have no filters, no bokeh lens. You just mentally play the hand you’re dealt.
Leave your camera at home much more often, more of... (show quote)


Excellent advice to improve your pre-visualization skills. Olddutch suggested not leaving home without your camera but you don't have to take it out of the car until you are ready to push the button. Use your brain first.

Thanks!!

Dodie

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:52:05   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
CHG_CANON wrote:
No one has as much luck with their camera as those who practice their craft.

Here's a helpful post based on technique: How to obtain sharp images in digital photography


Very good advice!! Thank you for the link. I have found several of your articles very informative and this is one I particularly like to re-read.

Thank you!

Dodie

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 16:54:54   #
Crichmond Loc: Loveland, CO
 

Reply
Nov 19, 2021 17:00:11   #
luvmypets Loc: Born & raised Texan living in Fayetteville NC
 
E.L.. Shapiro wrote:
The operative word in your question is "improve". Many folks believe that improvement will come with upgrading equipment and that's what there is so much conversation about gear. That ain't necessarily so. A better camera or lens may yield sharper imagery and more sophisticated automatic features may facilitate more accurate exposure and focus but there is no engineering or feature in any camera or lens that can address LIGHTING AND COMPOSITION. Those are an element that makes a photograph more impactful, story-telling and brings the viewers' eyes to the main subject of any image. Lighting sets the mood and brings a 3rd dimension to a two-dimensional sheet of paerr or a flat-screen.

I would advise folks to study the principles of light and composition, not the set rules. People will get hung up on a rule such as the rule of thirds and try an apply it to everything they shoot or that a certain kind of lighting- soft, hard, directional, flat, whatever, is the "best" way to go for specific situations. This leads to stagnation. If they study and learn the basic principles and practical physics of light they can learn to apply them in a more creative and experimental manner. Learn the mechanics and create the aesthetics. Certain basis of composition, utilization of space and format, negative space, proportions and placement of subjects are the basics so the photograph can conform or deviate from the set rules and compose as per his or her sense of expression.

In this and many other forums, the subject of light, use of light and lighting control is sourly neglected. If the basic principles are understood they can be applied to artificial and natural light, studio work and available light.

General advice like "read the manual" or "practice, practice, practice" apples to everything where skills are involved- mechanics, sports, playing a musical instrument, brain surgery, whatever! You can't get anywhere if you don't know how to operate the tools and equipment and continuing practice and learning are also essential.
The operative word in your question is "impro... (show quote)


Thank you for all this wonderful advice! You and CHG_CANON both offer excellent advice and information and I look forward to your posts.

Have you considered authoring articles/tutorials on the use and control of light that would help educate UHH members. I, for one, would be quite interested.

Dodie

Reply
Page <prev 2 of 18 next> last>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Main Photography Discussion
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2022 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.