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release the shutter at the exact moment
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Aug 13, 2021 14:58:46   #
Dan' de Bourgogne
 
Sometimes, I like to shoot droplets like those in the pictures bellow.
Of course, it's all about exact timing.
I want to fire the speedlights (2x) just at the moment when the water "strectches" and begins to fall down.
For now, I have to take tons of pictures to get 1 acceptable result.
It's always either too early or too late!!!

Has somebody an idea if there is a special device to release the shutter just when needed?

The problem is to synchronize finely the shutter realease with the optimum instant.
Do You believe a sort of "IR-fence" would be convenient?

As all the stuff was set up in the kitchen (stands/tripods/"geled" speedlights/DSLR/reflectors/background) I decided to shoot also what happened at the end of the "travel downwards".

Also a challenge timing. But then, there is a sound..."plop"...a sound sensor should be great to release the shutter.
Which one would You recommend?


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Aug 13, 2021 15:12:12   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA, United States
 
Nothing that I know of will release the shutter when a drop is in the position that you want it.
It would also have to incorporate any shutter lag time.
Have you tried burst mode?
If you are tripping the shutter, you have two variables to worry about: your reaction time and shutter lag.

Reply
Aug 13, 2021 15:21:12   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
http://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/learn-center/photography-tips/macro/capturing-water-droplets-a-quick-how-to-on-getting-that-perfect
โ€”Bob

Dan' de Bourgogne wrote:
Sometimes, I like to shoot droplets like those in the pictures bellow.
Of course, it's all about exact timing.
I want to fire the speedlights (2x) just at the moment when the water "strectches" and begins to fall down.
For now, I have to take tons of pictures to get 1 acceptable result.
It's always either too early or too late!!!

Has somebody an idea if there is a special device to release the shutter just when needed?

The problem is to synchronize finely the shutter realease with the optimum instant.
Do You believe a sort of "IR-fence" would be convenient?

As all the stuff was set up in the kitchen (stands/tripods/"geled" speedlights/DSLR/reflectors/background) I decided to shoot also what happened at the end of the "travel downwards".

Also a challenge timing. But then, there is a sound..."plop"...a sound sensor should be great to release the shutter.
Which one would You recommend?
Sometimes, I like to shoot droplets like those in ... (show quote)

Reply
 
 
Aug 13, 2021 15:28:11   #
survivaldealer Loc: NE Utah
 
Fabulous shots.

Reply
Aug 13, 2021 15:35:55   #
robertjerl Loc: Corona, California
 
Dan' de Bourgogne wrote:
Sometimes, I like to shoot droplets like those in the pictures bellow.
Of course, it's all about exact timing.
I want to fire the speedlights (2x) just at the moment when the water "strectches" and begins to fall down.
For now, I have to take tons of pictures to get 1 acceptable result.
It's always either too early or too late!!!

Has somebody an idea if there is a special device to release the shutter just when needed?

The problem is to synchronize finely the shutter realease with the optimum instant.
Do You believe a sort of "IR-fence" would be convenient?

As all the stuff was set up in the kitchen (stands/tripods/"geled" speedlights/DSLR/reflectors/background) I decided to shoot also what happened at the end of the "travel downwards".

Also a challenge timing. But then, there is a sound..."plop"...a sound sensor should be great to release the shutter.
Which one would You recommend?
Sometimes, I like to shoot droplets like those in ... (show quote)


The cheap, crude way is to use high speed burst - the higher the fps a burst your camera will do the better. Start water dripping hit shutter to start burst, set off flash* and then pick the best shot or repeat until you get what you want. Delete the rest and reformat your memory card.

* And instead of "speed lights" use steady bright LEDs or similar. At a class on macro photography a pro did it your way with what he said was $10,000 worth of gear=2 pro grade flashes, electronic sensor hooked to the camera and a laptop controlling the whole thing inside a three sided space surrounded by photo reflectors. Absolutely great results with very few shots taken. Then he demoed the cheap crude way with $100 worth of small LEDs, the water drip set up, some colored cellophane taped over the LEDs and his same camera and lens (I think he was using 1/4000). Turn on LEDs, start water dripping, take a burst check results, repeat until you get what you want. Save good images, reformat card. No one could tell which final shots were taken with which setup. And his "drip machine" for the crude way was a rubber bladder with a microscopic pin hole wrapped in cloth and hung on some bent coat hangers over a cake pan of water. Plus he added that you could dispense with the colored "filters" by raiding the cake icing food color set in the cabinets and using colored water. And you could eliminate the LEDs by setting it up near a window on a bright day with a couple of sheets of cardboard as reflectors (he did some with the cardboard covered in wrinkled Reynold Wrap foil for a mottled look to the colors of the water).

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Aug 13, 2021 15:57:33   #
Dan' de Bourgogne
 
Longshadow wrote:
Nothing that I know of will release the shutter when a drop is in the position that you want it.
It would also have to incorporate any shutter lag time.
Have you tried burst mode?
If you are tripping the shutter, you have two variables to worry about: your reaction time and shutter lag.


Good evening Longshadow! Yes, You are right...a shutter lag time should be "ajusted" depending of how long one want to get the drop "stretched"...millisecondes are here involved.

Honestly, I first had the idea to try burst mode but then I supposed the speedlights (2x Nikon SB-26) would never recycle that fast. So I did'nt shot burst.
But I will try...who know...I have nothing to loose giving it a try.
Thank You for Your help.

Reply
Aug 13, 2021 16:00:00   #
joecichjr Loc: Chicago S. Suburbs, Illinois, USA
 
Dan' de Bourgogne wrote:
Sometimes, I like to shoot droplets like those in the pictures bellow.
Of course, it's all about exact timing.
I want to fire the speedlights (2x) just at the moment when the water "strectches" and begins to fall down.
For now, I have to take tons of pictures to get 1 acceptable result.
It's always either too early or too late!!!

Has somebody an idea if there is a special device to release the shutter just when needed?

The problem is to synchronize finely the shutter realease with the optimum instant.
Do You believe a sort of "IR-fence" would be convenient?

As all the stuff was set up in the kitchen (stands/tripods/"geled" speedlights/DSLR/reflectors/background) I decided to shoot also what happened at the end of the "travel downwards".

Also a challenge timing. But then, there is a sound..."plop"...a sound sensor should be great to release the shutter.
Which one would You recommend?
Sometimes, I like to shoot droplets like those in ... (show quote)


Excellent dazzlers ๐ŸŒˆ๐ŸŒˆ๐ŸŒˆ๐ŸŒˆ

Reply
 
 
Aug 13, 2021 17:05:37   #
Dan' de Bourgogne
 
robertjerl wrote:
The cheap, crude way is to use high speed burst - the higher the fps a burst your camera will do the better. Start water dripping hit shutter to start burst, set off flash* and then pick the best shot or repeat until you get what you want. Delete the rest and reformat your memory card.

* And instead of "speed lights" use steady bright LEDs or similar. At a class on macro photography a pro did it your way with what he said was $10,000 worth of gear=2 pro grade flashes, electronic sensor hooked to the camera and a laptop controlling the whole thing inside a three sided space surrounded by photo reflectors. Absolutely great results with very few shots taken. Then he demoed the cheap crude way with $100 worth of small LEDs, the water drip set up, some colored cellophane taped over the LEDs and his same camera and lens (I think he was using 1/4000). Turn on LEDs, start water dripping, take a burst check results, repeat until you get what you want. Save good images, reformat card. No one could tell which final shots were taken with which setup. And his "drip machine" for the crude way was a rubber bladder with a microscopic pin hole wrapped in cloth and hung on some bent coat hangers over a cake pan of water. Plus he added that you could dispense with the colored "filters" by raiding the cake icing food color set in the cabinets and using colored water. And you could eliminate the LEDs by setting it up near a window on a bright day with a couple of sheets of cardboard as reflectors (he did some with the cardboard covered in wrinkled Reynold Wrap foil for a mottled look to the colors of the water).
The cheap, crude way is to use high speed burst - ... (show quote)

Thank You Robertjerl! I'm pleased because several HHG members already suggested HS burst mode...I will give it a try. I will also try with steady light...I will buy some LED strips/garlands (IKEA) and colored cellophane. Last year, I already used crumpled shiny aluminum foil as reflector: it creates an interesting pattern kind of mix "shadowy/highlight" on the surface where the droplet impacts the water. But the color was given by gels taped on the speedlights: in Dijon, using colored stuff for cooking is not common=quite rare. So, I don't even know where in Dijon to buy some color for food. The easiest way is certainly via internet...for sure I can get some colors in few days. So using "colored water" (instead of clear tapwater) makes gels + backdrops useless.
OK Robertjerl, You gave me 2 superb ideas...which I will try ASAP.
Thank You again.

Reply
Aug 13, 2021 17:31:47   #
Dan' de Bourgogne
 
rmalarz wrote:
http://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/learn-center/photography-tips/macro/capturing-water-droplets-a-quick-how-to-on-getting-that-perfect
โ€”Bob


Thank You Rmalarz for the link. I just had a look there: it seems I'm on the right way...Next time I will hang the "drip machine" just a tad higher than I did today thus making the droplets get stronger impact, more boucing etc. acheving a more pleasing picture.
Thank You for the time You spent to "locate" this interesting link.
Kind of You

Reply
Aug 13, 2021 17:37:44   #
Dan' de Bourgogne
 
survivaldealer wrote:
Fabulous shots.


Thank You for Your comment. I'm glad You find them pleasant.

Reply
Aug 13, 2021 17:44:37   #
Dan' de Bourgogne
 
joecichjr wrote:
Excellent dazzlers ๐ŸŒˆ๐ŸŒˆ๐ŸŒˆ๐ŸŒˆ


Thank You Joecichjr! I apprรฉciate Your compliment.

Reply
 
 
Aug 13, 2021 19:47:44   #
robertjerl Loc: Corona, California
 
Dan' de Bourgogne wrote:
Thank You Robertjerl! I'm pleased because several HHG members already suggested HS burst mode...I will give it a try. I will also try with steady light...I will buy some LED strips/garlands (IKEA) and colored cellophane. Last year, I already used crumpled shiny aluminum foil as reflector: it creates an interesting pattern kind of mix "shadowy/highlight" on the surface where the droplet impacts the water. But the color was given by gels taped on the speedlights: in Dijon, using colored stuff for cooking is not common=quite rare. So, I don't even know where in Dijon to buy some color for food. The easiest way is certainly via internet...for sure I can get some colors in few days. So using "colored water" (instead of clear tapwater) makes gels + backdrops useless.
OK Robertjerl, You gave me 2 superb ideas...which I will try ASAP.
Thank You again.
Thank You Robertjerl! I'm pleased because several ... (show quote)


You are welcome. The food coloring is in the baking section of our markets as it is used for cake icing. I have seen sets of 3or4 up to 24 different colors. It is very concentrated so they are small 1/4 oz/6ml squeeze bottles. But for bakery use they come in much bigger containers.

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Aug 14, 2021 00:03:42   #
Bozsik Loc: Orangevale, California
 
Has somebody an idea if there is a special device to release the shutter just when needed?

The problem is to synchronize finely the shutter realease with the optimum instant.
Do You believe a sort of "IR-fence" would be convenient?

As all the stuff was set up in the kitchen (stands/tripods/"geled" speedlights/DSLR/reflectors/background) I decided to shoot also what happened at the end of the "travel downwards".

Also a challenge timing. But then, there is a sound..."plop"...a sound sensor should be great to release the shutter.
Which one would You recommend?[/quote]

Dan,
I recommend the high speed devices by https://cognisys-inc.com/. They have a device that is specifically for shooting water droplets. I have a few of their devices for the high speed stuff I capture. Technique is just as important as the equipment. It looks like you already have the technique and lighting down already.

I have attached two more difficult subjects to capture, but once you plan out the logistics of the target, you will be set to go.

Good luck.


(Download)


(Download)

Reply
Aug 14, 2021 04:44:47   #
Dan' de Bourgogne
 
Bozsik wrote:
Has somebody an idea if there is a special device to release the shutter just when needed?

The problem is to synchronize finely the shutter realease with the optimum instant.
Do You believe a sort of "IR-fence" would be convenient?

As all the stuff was set up in the kitchen (stands/tripods/"geled" speedlights/DSLR/reflectors/background) I decided to shoot also what happened at the end of the "travel downwards".

Also a challenge timing. But then, there is a sound..."plop"...a sound sensor should be great to release the shutter.
Which one would You recommend?
Has somebody an idea if there is a special device ... (show quote)


Dan,
I recommend the high speed devices by https://cognisys-inc.com/. They have a device that is specifically for shooting water droplets. I have a few of their devices for the high speed stuff I capture. Technique is just as important as the equipment. It looks like you already have the technique and lighting down already.

I have attached two more difficult subjects to capture, but once you plan out the logistics of the target, you will be set to go.

Good luck.[/quote]

Thank You Bozsik! Once again Your help is priceless! The "simplest" kit from COGNISYS is exactly what I'm looking for. As the price is 399 USD, it comes on the wishlist for Xst-mas (of course, everything else on that list will cost 450 USD mini.)



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Aug 14, 2021 06:33:54   #
JohnR Loc: The Gates of Hell
 
rmalarz wrote:
http://learnandsupport.getolympus.com/learn-center/photography-tips/macro/capturing-water-droplets-a-quick-how-to-on-getting-that-perfect
โ€”Bob


Thanks Bob - very interesting!

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