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Jun 16, 2021 08:31:13   #
Jack47 Loc: Ontario
 
stant52 wrote:
Yeah , I saw that shadow also ,but I thought the pictures seem too soft ? I guess thats what I mean ,there isn't sharp enough detail ? Or am I being too critical ? Thanks


What lens were you using?

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Jun 16, 2021 08:39:14   #
gvarner Loc: Central Oregon Coast
 
I like the composition in your second one. Shallow focus makes the subject stand out.

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Jun 16, 2021 08:59:45   #
stant52 Loc: Williamsport, Pa.
 
ejones0310 wrote:
They appear to be too soft to me. Do you do any sharpening in post? Your lighting also needs some work. Try a different angl where the light can be seen shining through the flower. A light modifier would also be of help. They look like you shot them in full sun with the sun behind you. That’s a cliche lighting theme, which makes photos look run of the mill. Branch out, try some things you haven’t tried before. Look at things from different angles than the normal.
D
I went back to photo #2 and looked at the exit data. I see your shutter speed was only 1/30 second and your ISO was 200 and aperture 5.6. Given your focal length was 220mm, I would say you were using a zoom. Try a prime lens with a close focus and boost your ISO so that you can get your shutter speed up and also your aperture into the f8.0 range. That should sharpen things up. Most zooms are a little soft compared to a prime. Also your shutter speed should be faster than 1/focal length to combat motion blur. The faster the better so long as it doesn’t compromise your aperture. If you can’t get the speed into that range mount your camera on a tripod and turn the VR off.

I know that’s a lot to digest, but you did ask.
They appear to be too soft to me. Do you do any sh... (show quote)


Thanks , It funny you state "They look like you shot them in full sun with the sun behind you." The yellow lilies were all taken at about 8 pm with heavy overcast skys ,no sun at all. I was shooting with my "go to " lense Nikon 18-140mm. 99% of my pictures are taken with it .

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Jun 16, 2021 09:05:21   #
Bayou
 
In general, they are rather soft, and could be so for numerous reasons. The last shot of the yellow lillies is the best of the bunch. The Nikon 18-140mm lens is a fine all around lens, but not great for close, critical work. Also shutter speeds are rather low which introduces slight blurr. This lens, like most others, is not at its best wide open, or nearly so. Post processing could make them all better.

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Jun 16, 2021 09:26:05   #
Tjohn Loc: Inverness, FL formerly Arivaca, AZ
 
1. Use a tripod if you want sharp images,VR off. Use time delay to keep any hand movement out. Shake isn't the only problem. Your focus will be changing just a hair in distance and that is really important in close ups.
2. Try mid range opening, such as f/8. When close up, depth of field (focus) is short. f/2 shallow depth of field, f/64 deep depth of field, try f/8 and then fish around.
3. Shoot raw files and JPG. Process raw (lots of learning here). JPG is a processed raw file, processed by the camera.
4. Prime lenses are usually better than variable focal length but a whole lot less convenient.
5. Good light. Exposure generally better just a hair under exposed than a hair over exposed.
6. Composition: study, think, study, think, study, think, study, think, study, think.......
7. Subject and story.
8. Back off a hair. You can crop off but not on.
9. All hair references above are referring to those very rare and fine frog hairs.

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Jun 16, 2021 10:14:30   #
stant52 Loc: Williamsport, Pa.
 
Tjohn wrote:
1. Use a tripod if you want sharp images,VR off. Use time delay to keep any hand movement out. Shake isn't the only problem. Your focus will be changing just a hair in distance and that is really important in close ups.
2. Try mid range opening, such as f/8. When close up, depth of field (focus) is short. f/2 shallow depth of field, f/64 deep depth of field, try f/8 and then fish around.
3. Shoot raw files and JPG. Process raw (lots of learning here). JPG is a processed raw file, processed by the camera.
4. Prime lenses are usually better than variable focal length but a whole lot less convenient.
5. Good light. Exposure generally better just a hair under exposed than a hair over exposed.
6. Composition: study, think, study, think, study, think, study, think, study, think.......
7. Subject and story.
8. Back off a hair. You can crop off but not on.
9. All hair references above are referring to those very rare and fine frog hairs.
1. Use a tripod if you want sharp images,VR off. U... (show quote)




That gives me some ideas , I stated these pics were all hand held. I haven't tried my tripod and I have a remote release plus I do have a 35mm prime lense . 3 things that I haven't tried . I have only dabbled with raw files. So I definitely have some options to work with .
Thank you for the ideas.

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Jun 16, 2021 10:27:58   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
OK, by your own admission these are simply snapshots of flowers. What can you do to make them stand out among all of the flower photos posted here?
--Bob
stant52 wrote:
Looking at all the great pictures on here I have been attempting to obtain a shot as good as what I've seen . So here's a few to scrutinize. THey were all shot hand held and no pp.
Thank you

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Jun 16, 2021 11:26:12   #
selmslie Loc: Fernandina Beach, FL, USA
 
stant52 wrote:
Looking at all the great pictures on here I have been attempting to obtain a shot as good as what I've seen . So here's a few to scrutinize. THey were all shot hand held and no pp.
Thank you

Three things you can do for starters:

1. Shoot your flowers in direct sunlight.
2. Set the white balance to Daylight.
3. Set the ISO to 400 or less.

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Jun 16, 2021 11:51:07   #
Tjohn Loc: Inverness, FL formerly Arivaca, AZ
 
stant52 wrote:
That gives me some ideas , I stated these pics were all hand held. I haven't tried my tripod and I have a remote release plus I do have a 35mm prime lense . 3 things that I haven't tried . I have only dabbled with raw files. So I definitely have some options to work with .
Thank you for the ideas.


I recommend a set of magnifying filters for the 35mm. It can serve as a macro lens. I did the same on a Zeiss lens and saved the weight of the macro with almost exactly the same results.

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Jun 16, 2021 11:56:40   #
sb Loc: Florida's East Coast
 
Sharpness, clarity, composition, and lighting are all so important when photographing flowers. Look at OldHippy's submissions here for examples of beautiful flower photographs. He tends to photograph single flowers fairly close up, not bunches, but his composition and the lighting are always spot on.

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Jun 16, 2021 14:34:03   #
Silverrails
 
stant52 wrote:
Looking at all the great pictures on here I have been attempting to obtain a shot as good as what I've seen . So here's a few to scrutinize. THey were all shot hand held and no pp.
Thank you


Very Nice Images, although I am thinking the Focus is not perfect, It could be your Eyes, could be the Lens, could be the Camera. Maybe Aperture is too Low, looks like it might be 1.8mm on the Camera setting, Just increase your aperture to maybe 5.6 or higher if necessary, you will increase your D.O.F. which is one factor in having a correct Focus in your image.

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Jun 16, 2021 14:49:47   #
hjachym Loc: West Michigan
 
Let's take a look, and before I begin it will be my opinion and just that. There may be those who agree and those who don't. But that is what a forum like this is about. All are reasonably good renditions of flowers. Look at #1 compared to #2. #1 is a bunch of flowers, #2 is isolated on one bud with the background in soft focus. Much better. I feel if the three partial flowers on the right hand side were no there the composition would be greatly improved.
Now comparing #3 to #4. Look how the dark, almost black background helps the flowers stand out. I think a little more exposure on #3 is needed. Also I think #3 was shot natural light because there is what appears to be a shadow near the bottom.
Again, this in just my $0.02 please use it as you see fit.
Harry

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Jun 16, 2021 14:55:49   #
fforbes Loc: Florida
 
A bit more attention to composition might be in order. These all seem to have "bulls eye" centering on the main subject. Try putting the main subject according to the rule of thirds (intersections of the frame divided into thirds.

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Jun 16, 2021 15:42:22   #
joecichjr Loc: Chicago S. Suburbs, Illinois, USA
 
stant52 wrote:
Looking at all the great pictures on here I have been attempting to obtain a shot as good as what I've seen . So here's a few to scrutinize. THey were all shot hand held and no pp.
Thank you


I think you're doing fine Just relax and have fun ⭐ You don't have to prove anything to anyone ✳️ Read about taking photos and then just do it 🍊🍊🍊

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Jun 16, 2021 18:50:21   #
RichinSeattle
 
I'll try to be a little more constructive: For macro work (e.g. individual blossoms) I like using a camera mounted, LED light bank. No synchronization required and your camera takes care of the exposure. Here's one from Amazon, $25.

https://www.amazon.com/Neewer-Dimmable-Cameras-Battery-Included/dp/B06XDFGDCX/ref=sr_1_16?crid=2Y7HUPG8LH4FT&dchild=1&keywords=led+photo+light&qid=1623883262&sprefix=LED+photo+light%2Caps%2C256&sr=8-16

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