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Should I take the additional lens?
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Jun 7, 2021 07:39:28   #
Howard5252 Loc: New York / Florida (now)
 
If you can, w/o busting any weight restrictions, the question becomes "Why would you NOT take it?

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Jun 7, 2021 08:22:01   #
APSHEPPARD
 
Assuming the lenses perform equally, for one stop I would increase the ISO. The other advice to get a longer lens is really useful for Yellowstone. If you are lucky enough to see the wolves long enough for photos, you will need that! Good luck!

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Jun 7, 2021 08:38:32   #
Xmsmn Loc: Minnesota
 
To all the Hoggers who took the time to respond, I thank all of you for good advice. The 135 stays home. Time I might have spent deciding which lens to use and changing lenses can be spent helping my grandson with first real experience with a camera, a Canon point&shoot from my shelf.
Glad I asked.
Mark

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Jun 7, 2021 08:38:58   #
lamiaceae Loc: San Luis Obispo County, CA
 
Xmsmn wrote:
I have an “extra lens” question. Heading to Yellowstone next week with my wife and our #1 grandson (9) for a week. My camera is an Olympus EM10 mk iii with the 14-42 f/3.5 kit lens and the 40-150 f/4.0 “plastic fantastic”. Both of these lenses are going along for sure. From my SLR days I have some Contax-Yashica lenses, one of which is a 135 mm f/2.8 for which I’ve bought an adapter that works well. It’s significantly heavier than the 40-150 because it’s metal and glass, but would it be worth it, with its wider aperture, to take it along for the lower light conditions in the early morning and later evening? I’m comfortable shooting in Manual. Or would I be better off boosting the ISO on the 40-150 in those conditions? (Additional lenses are not in the budget right now). Thanks in advance.
Mark
I have an “extra lens” question. Heading to Yellow... (show quote)


What ISO do you usually shoot at? If 200 to 400, travel light with the two zoom lenses. But if you usually are or anticipate on this trip shooting at ISO 5,600 you might save a fraction of a stop with a 2.8 over a 3.5.

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Jun 7, 2021 08:46:03   #
47greyfox Loc: Colorado front range
 
Curmudgeon wrote:
If you are traveling by private vehicle take everything you have.


My wive’s advice, err orders, as well. 🥴

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Jun 7, 2021 08:50:34   #
fetzler Loc: North West PA
 
Xmsmn wrote:
I have an “extra lens” question. Heading to Yellowstone next week with my wife and our #1 grandson (9) for a week. My camera is an Olympus EM10 mk iii with the 14-42 f/3.5 kit lens and the 40-150 f/4.0 “plastic fantastic”. Both of these lenses are going along for sure. From my SLR days I have some Contax-Yashica lenses, one of which is a 135 mm f/2.8 for which I’ve bought an adapter that works well. It’s significantly heavier than the 40-150 because it’s metal and glass, but would it be worth it, with its wider aperture, to take it along for the lower light conditions in the early morning and later evening? I’m comfortable shooting in Manual. Or would I be better off boosting the ISO on the 40-150 in those conditions? (Additional lenses are not in the budget right now). Thanks in advance.
Mark
I have an “extra lens” question. Heading to Yellow... (show quote)


I think you will be fine with what you have. If you feel the need to get shots of the Buffalo up and close consider renting a Panasonic 100-300mm. It is pretty small and has the reach of a 600mm lens on FF. It is likely comparable in size to the 135mm lens. Your other lenses are adequate for landscapes and close wildlife.

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Jun 7, 2021 09:00:35   #
frankraney Loc: Clovis, Ca. For the last 50 years.
 
Xmsmn wrote:
I have an “extra lens” question. Heading to Yellowstone next week with my wife and our #1 grandson (9) for a week. My camera is an Olympus EM10 mk iii with the 14-42 f/3.5 kit lens and the 40-150 f/4.0 “plastic fantastic”. Both of these lenses are going along for sure. From my SLR days I have some Contax-Yashica lenses, one of which is a 135 mm f/2.8 for which I’ve bought an adapter that works well. It’s significantly heavier than the 40-150 because it’s metal and glass, but would it be worth it, with its wider aperture, to take it along for the lower light conditions in the early morning and later evening? I’m comfortable shooting in Manual. Or would I be better off boosting the ISO on the 40-150 in those conditions? (Additional lenses are not in the budget right now). Thanks in advance.
Mark
I have an “extra lens” question. Heading to Yellow... (show quote)


If your not going for wildlife, take the two, leave the third.

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Jun 7, 2021 09:09:38   #
bikerguy
 
Since this is a trip with your grandson and not a photo expedition, go light and small. I have been to Yellowstone in the fall and winter. Do not take the 135 mm. Think enjoy the moment more than photography. When we were in Yellowstone in the fall less than 4% of my keepers were taken with anything longer than you 150 mm. Travel light and you will have a better time. With the Olympus you should not even need a tripod.

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Jun 7, 2021 09:49:35   #
dennis2146 Loc: So California/Colorado/Idaho
 
Xmsmn wrote:
I have an “extra lens” question. Heading to Yellowstone next week with my wife and our #1 grandson (9) for a week. My camera is an Olympus EM10 mk iii with the 14-42 f/3.5 kit lens and the 40-150 f/4.0 “plastic fantastic”. Both of these lenses are going along for sure. From my SLR days I have some Contax-Yashica lenses, one of which is a 135 mm f/2.8 for which I’ve bought an adapter that works well. It’s significantly heavier than the 40-150 because it’s metal and glass, but would it be worth it, with its wider aperture, to take it along for the lower light conditions in the early morning and later evening? I’m comfortable shooting in Manual. Or would I be better off boosting the ISO on the 40-150 in those conditions? (Additional lenses are not in the budget right now). Thanks in advance.
Mark
I have an “extra lens” question. Heading to Yellow... (show quote)


I would not take the extra lens. You already have the 135 within the 40-150 lens. As you pointed out, just up the ISO and don't worry about the extra lens. I suspect you won't need it. Have a great trip.

Dennis

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Jun 7, 2021 09:49:56   #
camerapapi Loc: Miami, Fl.
 
What you have, as advised by others, is more than enough. I like the idea of taking a small tripod or a light tripod if you wish for those times when the light is low. It is perfectly fine to shoot at base ISO while the camera is on a tripod.
I bet most of your images will come from the 14-42 kit lens.

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Jun 7, 2021 09:50:18   #
DaveO Loc: Northeast CT
 
Just a side note about the crowds: off to a record breaking year!

I would recommend doing any thermal features as early as possible and be prepared for numerous tie-ups no matter where you go!

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Jun 7, 2021 09:50:53   #
markinvictoria
 
I did a 10 day touristy photography type trip to Vermont last year. I flew from Texas and rented a car while there. Figured it was a one time trip so I took way too much photo gear including the 70-200 and 200-500. As it turned out I used my D500 and 18-140 for 99 percent of my shots. Also used my tripod and a polarizer filter a fair amount. I could have saved myself a lot of worry and grief if I traveled lighter photography wise. I was extremely happy with the photos taken on the trip.

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Jun 7, 2021 10:21:33   #
jerryc41 Loc: Catskill Mts of NY
 
User ID wrote:
Less is more.




It seems like what you already plan to bring is fine. I went there a few years ago with a compact camera, and I brought home 8.29 GB of great pictures.

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Jun 7, 2021 10:22:30   #
Hip Coyote
 
As a dedicated Oly shooter, and prior visitor to Yellowstone, my vote is to leave the lens at home. I would recommend renting a - 100-400 if possible. And - or if possible give the grand child a camera to shoot with as well...will add to the fun, There are animals there which are great to shoot, wolves, bears, etc...but the place also has amazing geologic things like boiling mud pots, steaming mountains, and of course the geysers. If your grand child is young enough to walk off or not follow directions, avoid hazards (such as stepping off a walking platform into hot water) then your main job is monitoring him and protecting him. Skip the photography. You cannot do both well...

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Jun 7, 2021 10:47:20   #
alfaman
 
Spending two weeks driving in Minnesota/great lakes/Chicago area at the end of August with Olympus OMD1 mkII. Appreciate any suggestions on interesting areas I should be looking at? Thank, Alfaman

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