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Apr 4, 2021 23:56:44   #
Rongnongno Loc: FL
 
Driving through the Midwest is just absolute nothingness and then every 70 miles you see “GOD IS REAL / HELL IS REAL TOO” followed by a sign for a store that sells XXL dildos

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Apr 5, 2021 01:13:14   #
rgrenaderphoto Loc: Hollywood, CA
 
Rongnongno wrote:
Driving through the Midwest is just absolute nothingness and then every 70 miles you see “GOD IS REAL / HELL IS REAL TOO” followed by a sign for a store that sells XXL dildos


Then you get to Wall Drugs

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Apr 5, 2021 11:46:36   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
Reminds me of a stop at a rural WV 7-11 type store. The front show case by the cash register had alcohol, ammunition, cigarettes, porn and lottery tickets - all the necessities of life

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Apr 5, 2021 12:26:03   #
jaymatt Loc: Alexandria, Indiana
 
I find beauty in the so-called nothingness of the Midwest, just as I find it in other parts of the country. Look for it and you will find it.

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Apr 5, 2021 20:47:09   #
DirtFarmer Loc: Way too close to New York City
 
I took a road trip in ‘61 across the country. There were interstate highways but I decided not to use them. Decided to measure the gas mileage as a function of average speed. So I would drive at 45 for 3 tanks of gas, then 3 tanks at 55, then 65. (Don’t really remember the results but I think 45 won).

One thing that I remember was driving 100 miles on a road that was perfectly straight, then coming to a sharp 90 degree turn, going about 100 yards, then a 90 the other way and then driving another 100 miles in the original direction on a perfectly straight road.

On that trip I got the impression that Kansas was flat. A few years later I found that Kansas was rolling hills. Saskatchewan was flat. The trans Canada highway was straight. There was a railroad track next to it and power lines on the other side. It didn’t matter what speed you went. Nothing moved. Everything came to a point in front of you. It was hard deciding whether you could pass someone because you couldn’t tell how far away the car coming towards you in the other lane was. It could have been a mile away. There was no scale to judge by.

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Apr 5, 2021 21:05:09   #
Rongnongno Loc: FL
 
DirtFarmer wrote:
I took a road trip in ‘61 across the country. There were interstate highways but I decided not to use them. Decided to measure the gas mileage as a function of average speed. So I would drive at 45 for 3 tanks of gas, then 3 tanks at 55, then 65. (Don’t really remember the results but I think 45 won).

One thing that I remember was driving 100 miles on a road that was perfectly straight, then coming to a sharp 90 degree turn, going about 100 yards, then a 90 the other way and then driving another 100 miles in the original direction on a perfectly straight road.

On that trip I got the impression that Kansas was flat. A few years later I found that Kansas was rolling hills. Saskatchewan was flat. The trans Canada highway was straight. There was a railroad track next to it and power lines on the other side. It didn’t matter what speed you went. Nothing moved. Everything came to a point in front of you. It was hard deciding whether you could pass someone because you couldn’t tell how far away the car coming towards you in the other lane was. It could have been a mile away. There was no scale to judge by.
I took a road trip in ‘61 across the country. Ther... (show quote)

Read like you were tired and had tunnel vision...

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Apr 5, 2021 23:59:28   #
lmTrying Loc: WV Northern Panhandle
 
DirtFarmer wrote:
I took a road trip in ‘61 across the country. There were interstate highways but I decided not to use them. Decided to measure the gas mileage as a function of average speed. So I would drive at 45 for 3 tanks of gas, then 3 tanks at 55, then 65. (Don’t really remember the results but I think 45 won).

One thing that I remember was driving 100 miles on a road that was perfectly straight, then coming to a sharp 90 degree turn, going about 100 yards, then a 90 the other way and then driving another 100 miles in the original direction on a perfectly straight road.

On that trip I got the impression that Kansas was flat. A few years later I found that Kansas was rolling hills. Saskatchewan was flat. The trans Canada highway was straight. There was a railroad track next to it and power lines on the other side. It didn’t matter what speed you went. Nothing moved. Everything came to a point in front of you. It was hard deciding whether you could pass someone because you couldn’t tell how far away the car coming towards you in the other lane was. It could have been a mile away. There was no scale to judge by.
I took a road trip in ‘61 across the country. Ther... (show quote)


In about '78 I was on a cross country bus tour of northern US and back across British Columbia and Saskatchewan. I know there was at least a 2-1/2 hour stretch of absolutely straight, level road. I never saw so many sunflowers in my life. I shouted to the driver of the bus (he was 26, I was 27, everyone else was retired) a couple of times to ask if he was still awake. The other crazy thing was driving through those huge mountain, then emerging on to that perfectly flat plain. No foot hills. Just mountains, bang, flat! Amazing!

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