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Challenge: "Sepia" (or monochrome) Nov 2-4, 2020
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Nov 1, 2020 17:28:54   #
PAToGraphy Loc: Portland ME area
 
November and March are my least favorite months, but November especially. After a blaze of Fall color, everything is drab, "desaturated", and usually damp and raw. See what you can do with sepia or other monochrome (avoiding black and white for this challenge) to brighten up the month before winter. (I know its not like this for other parts of the country, but give it a go anyway)
Simple weed - sepia transformed it
Simple weed - sepia transformed it...
(Download)
Evergreen fronds in a different hue
Evergreen fronds in a different hue...
(Download)

Nov 1, 2020 18:03:48   #
captivecookie
 
These are quite old, digitally speaking. Don't do much sepia these days.


(Download)


(Download)

Nov 1, 2020 18:07:48   #
Roadrunner Loc: Quebec, Canada
 
PAToGraphy wrote:
November and March are my least favorite months, but November especially. After a blaze of Fall color, everything is drab, "desaturated", and usually damp and raw. See what you can do with sepia or other monochrome (avoiding black and white for this challenge) to brighten up the month before winter. (I know its not like this for other parts of the country, but give it a go anyway)


Thanks Pat, will try.

 
 
Nov 1, 2020 18:08:56   #
PAR4DCR Loc: A Sunny Place
 
Battle of New Orleans (War of 1812) reenactors.

Don


(Download)

Nov 1, 2020 19:09:34   #
Roadrunner Loc: Quebec, Canada
 
Trying


(Download)

Nov 1, 2020 19:52:05   #
boberic Loc: Quiet Corner, Connecticut. Ex long Islander
 
This years corn crop
loadin the truck
loadin the truck...
(Download)
to the silo
to the silo...
(Download)

Nov 1, 2020 20:05:24   #
Tex-s
 
PAToGraphy wrote:
November and March are my least favorite months, but November especially. After a blaze of Fall color, everything is drab, "desaturated", and usually damp and raw. See what you can do with sepia or other monochrome (avoiding black and white for this challenge) to brighten up the month before winter. (I know its not like this for other parts of the country, but give it a go anyway)


Disclaimer : This is an image of a toned cyanotype print of a previously taken image.

The original image is nothing more than a hitching post about 2000 feet up a trail at Guadalupe Mountains National Park. It happens to be at the Pine Top trail junction.

The original was converted to B/W, inverted horizontally, inverted black-to-white, and printed onto a transparent film.

The film was used as a mask on top of a cyanotype-prepped art paper surface and exposed to sunlight, creating the typical bright blue monochrome cyanotype coloration. After finishing in hydrogen peroxide, a good rinse and drying, the blue cyanotype was exposed to very low concentrations of aqueous sodium carbonate, rinsed and soaked in concentrated, but cooled, green tea for about 40 minutes. The resulting interaction changed the blue to this semi-sepia color.

Other soaks can produce somewhat purple colors, near B/W renditions, and a pronounced brown, depending on which source of tannins is employed.



 
 
Nov 1, 2020 20:39:58   #
SueScott Loc: Hammondsville, Ohio
 
I took these the other day up in PA.


(Download)


(Download)

Nov 1, 2020 21:35:32   #
Ourspolair
 
Tex-s wrote:
Disclaimer : This is an image of a toned cyanotype print of a previously taken image.

The original image is nothing more than a hitching post about 2000 feet up a trail at Guadalupe Mountains National Park. It happens to be at the Pine Top trail junction.

The original was converted to B/W, inverted horizontally, inverted black-to-white, and printed onto a transparent film.

The film was used as a mask on top of a cyanotype-prepped art paper surface and exposed to sunlight, creating the typical bright blue monochrome cyanotype coloration. After finishing in hydrogen peroxide, a good rinse and drying, the blue cyanotype was exposed to very low concentrations of aqueous sodium carbonate, rinsed and soaked in concentrated, but cooled, green tea for about 40 minutes. The resulting interaction changed the blue to this semi-sepia color.

Other soaks can produce somewhat purple colors, near B/W renditions, and a pronounced brown, depending on which source of tannins is employed.
Disclaimer : This is an image of a toned cyanotype... (show quote)


Brilliant revival of the technique. Kudos!

Nov 1, 2020 21:36:21   #
PAToGraphy Loc: Portland ME area
 
captivecookie wrote:
These are quite old, digitally speaking. Don't do much sepia these days.


They may be old but they work!

Nov 1, 2020 22:56:24   #
Tex-s
 
SueScott wrote:
I took these the other day up in PA.


Great pair. The latter is a textbook example of when monochrome is most effective, when color serves only to distract from the subject and lines.

 
 
Nov 1, 2020 23:00:50   #
Tex-s
 
Ourspolair wrote:
Brilliant revival of the technique. Kudos!


I do a 'lab' of this technique with my chemistry classes each spring. We first learn the chemistry of the Talbot salt print technique (and test on it). Then we work similar voodoo with the safer (no silver nitrate) cyanotype chemistry. The results of the cyanotype are sharper usually, and FAR more consistent with no accidental cross contamination of solutions. Kids really like it, too, and the cost per kid, not counting Walmart 8x10 frames is less than 3 dollars.

Nov 1, 2020 23:24:26   #
dane004 Loc: WYOMING
 
Tex-s wrote:
Disclaimer : This is an image of a toned cyanotype print of a previously taken image.

The original image is nothing more than a hitching post about 2000 feet up a trail at Guadalupe Mountains National Park. It happens to be at the Pine Top trail junction.

The original was converted to B/W, inverted horizontally, inverted black-to-white, and printed onto a transparent film.

The film was used as a mask on top of a cyanotype-prepped art paper surface and exposed to sunlight, creating the typical bright blue monochrome cyanotype coloration. After finishing in hydrogen peroxide, a good rinse and drying, the blue cyanotype was exposed to very low concentrations of aqueous sodium carbonate, rinsed and soaked in concentrated, but cooled, green tea for about 40 minutes. The resulting interaction changed the blue to this semi-sepia color.

Other soaks can produce somewhat purple colors, near B/W renditions, and a pronounced brown, depending on which source of tannins is employed.
Disclaimer : This is an image of a toned cyanotype... (show quote)


TEX very nicely done.

Nov 1, 2020 23:27:59   #
dane004 Loc: WYOMING
 
PAToGraphy wrote:
November and March are my least favorite months, but November especially. After a blaze of Fall color, everything is drab, "desaturated", and usually damp and raw. See what you can do with sepia or other monochrome (avoiding black and white for this challenge) to brighten up the month before winter. (I know its not like this for other parts of the country, but give it a go anyway)


Thanks for Hosting Pat looks like fun.

Nov 2, 2020 01:03:16   #
Photogirl17 Loc: Glenwood, Ark.
 
PAToGraphy wrote:
November and March are my least favorite months, but November especially. After a blaze of Fall color, everything is drab, "desaturated", and usually damp and raw. See what you can do with sepia or other monochrome (avoiding black and white for this challenge) to brighten up the month before winter. (I know its not like this for other parts of the country, but give it a go anyway)


Great beginning Pat, I'll be back.

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