Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
On plants and under dead wood
Sep 17, 2020 00:37:32   #
Mark Sturtevant Loc: Grand Blanc, MI
 
I need to roll over rotting logs and lift up loose tree bark more often. There’s stuff under there, and what is nice is they seldom fly away on me.
First up is a queen bald faced hornet (Dolichovespula maculate) that was evidently going into hibernation even though it was only October (last year).
Bald-faced hornet by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Next is a semi-mysterious beetle larva. This will be a “wireworm” in the family Tenebrionidae.
Darkling beetle larva by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

And here is another semi-mystery beetle larva. It looks to be for a fire-colored beetle, Pyrochroidae. The big pinchers on the rear end is possibly an example of false head mimicry, where an insect has an ersatz head that distracts predators.
Fire-colored beetle larva by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Most any time I want I can find a few of these psychedelic leafhoppers in my yard (Graphocephala coccinea). Most are blue and red, but I also see green and red ones. An accepted common name is ‘candy-striped leafhopper’, and I just like saying that name.
Candy-striped leafhopper by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Moving on to two caterpillars. First is a new species, the hitched arches caterpillar (Melanchra adjuncta). This was on what I think was a native sunflower. According to pictures in BG they are normally green, so the color of this one suggests it will soon pupate.
Hitched arches caterpillar by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Next is a hooded owlet caterpillar Cucullia convexipennis. I see quite a few of these late in the summer. Very easy to spot for obvious reasons.
Hooded owlet caterpillar by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Last is a new kind of cricket. There were a few of these, all female, on this one tree trunk. I don’t like to think about how much time it took me to find the ID, mainly b/c I was barking up the wrong tree as it were. But now we both know it’s a jumping bush cricket, Orocharis saltator. This is a member of a group of species called loud singing bush crickets! Maybe I’ve heard of them…
Jumping bush cricket by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

| Reply
Sep 17, 2020 03:38:48   #
lamiaceae Loc: San Luis Obispo County, CA
 
Mark Sturtevant wrote:
I need to roll over rotting logs and lift up loose tree bark more often. There’s stuff under there, and what is nice is they seldom fly away on me.
First up is a queen bald faced hornet (Dolichovespula maculate) that was evidently going into hibernation even though it was only October (last year).
Bald-faced hornet by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Next is a semi-mysterious beetle larva. This will be a “wireworm” in the family Tenebrionidae.
Darkling beetle larva by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

And here is another semi-mystery beetle larva. It looks to be for a fire-colored beetle, Pyrochroidae. The big pinchers on the rear end is possibly an example of false head mimicry, where an insect has an ersatz head that distracts predators.
Fire-colored beetle larva by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Most any time I want I can find a few of these psychedelic leafhoppers in my yard (Graphocephala coccinea). Most are blue and red, but I also see green and red ones. An accepted common name is ‘candy-striped leafhopper’, and I just like saying that name.
Candy-striped leafhopper by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Moving on to two caterpillars. First is a new species, the hitched arches caterpillar (Melanchra adjuncta). This was on what I think was a native sunflower. According to pictures in BG they are normally green, so the color of this one suggests it will soon pupate.
Hitched arches caterpillar by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Next is a hooded owlet caterpillar Cucullia convexipennis. I see quite a few of these late in the summer. Very easy to spot for obvious reasons.
Hooded owlet caterpillar by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Last is a new kind of cricket. There were a few of these, all female, on this one tree trunk. I don’t like to think about how much time it took me to find the ID, mainly b/c I was barking up the wrong tree as it were. But now we both know it’s a jumping bush cricket, Orocharis saltator. This is a member of a group of species called loud singing bush crickets! Maybe I’ve heard of them…
Jumping bush cricket by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr
I need to roll over rotting logs and lift up loose... (show quote)


Interesting. Nice images. But if you do ever visit the Western USA, do be careful looking under logs as what you find might have a rattle.

| Reply
Sep 17, 2020 04:51:45   #
Manglesphoto Loc: 70 miles south of St.Louis
 
Mark Sturtevant wrote:
I need to roll over rotting logs and lift up loose tree bark more often. There’s stuff under there, and what is nice is they seldom fly away on me.
First up is a queen bald faced hornet (Dolichovespula maculate) that was evidently going into hibernation even though it was only October (last year).
Bald-faced hornet by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Next is a semi-mysterious beetle larva. This will be a “wireworm” in the family Tenebrionidae.
Darkling beetle larva by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

And here is another semi-mystery beetle larva. It looks to be for a fire-colored beetle, Pyrochroidae. The big pinchers on the rear end is possibly an example of false head mimicry, where an insect has an ersatz head that distracts predators.
Fire-colored beetle larva by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Most any time I want I can find a few of these psychedelic leafhoppers in my yard (Graphocephala coccinea). Most are blue and red, but I also see green and red ones. An accepted common name is ‘candy-striped leafhopper’, and I just like saying that name.
Candy-striped leafhopper by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Moving on to two caterpillars. First is a new species, the hitched arches caterpillar (Melanchra adjuncta). This was on what I think was a native sunflower. According to pictures in BG they are normally green, so the color of this one suggests it will soon pupate.
Hitched arches caterpillar by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Next is a hooded owlet caterpillar Cucullia convexipennis. I see quite a few of these late in the summer. Very easy to spot for obvious reasons.
Hooded owlet caterpillar by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Last is a new kind of cricket. There were a few of these, all female, on this one tree trunk. I don’t like to think about how much time it took me to find the ID, mainly b/c I was barking up the wrong tree as it were. But now we both know it’s a jumping bush cricket, Orocharis saltator. This is a member of a group of species called loud singing bush crickets! Maybe I’ve heard of them…
Jumping bush cricket by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr
I need to roll over rotting logs and lift up loose... (show quote)


Great set of images!!!! Mark

| Reply
Sep 17, 2020 11:29:33   #
Cwilson341 Loc: Central Florida
 
Mark, these are outstanding shots. You’ve managed to turn creepy crawlies into beautiful beings!

| Reply
Sep 18, 2020 08:52:35   #
raymondh Loc: Walker, MI
 
Always interesting! (I would move the hornet into the permanent dead department - they’re nasty.)

| Reply
Sep 18, 2020 08:58:11   #
Country Boy Loc: Beckley, WV
 
Very interesting series and well done!

| Reply
Sep 18, 2020 08:58:55   #
EnglishBrenda Loc: Kent, England
 
I need to look under logs too. Nice selection and write up.

| Reply
Sep 18, 2020 09:13:00   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
Outstanding set Mark!!!
-Doc

| Reply
Sep 18, 2020 09:30:26   #
JRiepe Loc: Southern Illinois
 
Nice shots Mark. When I would visit the forest preserves in Northern Illinois I would turn over boards, logs and pieces of tin looking for critters to shoot. I found worms, slugs, spiders and several insects.

| Reply
Sep 18, 2020 10:34:42   #
tinusbum Loc: east texas
 
good job!

| Reply
Sep 18, 2020 13:57:58   #
sippyjug104 Loc: Missouri
 
Excellent Series!

| Reply
Sep 18, 2020 17:21:06   #
Ourspolair
 
Great post and interesting narrative. Excellent images - stay well and keep on posting!

| Reply
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2020 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.