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Remembering America’s Heroes in China
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Jul 22, 2020 08:39:41   #
rehess Loc: not here
 
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/21/asia/world-war-2-flying-tigers-intl-hnk-scli/index.html


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Jul 22, 2020 09:03:46   #
Bill 45
 
Forgetting war hero who became the subject of legends.

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Jul 22, 2020 09:43:41   #
rehess Loc: not here
 
Interestingly enough, the article does say "Perhaps the best known of the Flying Tigers, US Marine aviator Greg Boyington -- around whom the 1970's TV show "Black Sheep Squadron" was based -- was in it for the money.
"Having gone through a painful divorce and responsible for an ex-wife and several small children, he had ruined his credit and incurred substantial debt, and the Marine Corps had ordered him to submit a monthly report to his commander on how he accounted for his pay in settling those debts," according to a US Defense Department history of the group
".

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Jul 23, 2020 06:32:38   #
Chian Kho
 
rehess wrote:
Interestingly enough, the article does say "Perhaps the best known of the Flying Tigers, US Marine aviator Greg Boyington -- around whom the 1970's TV show "Black Sheep Squadron" was based -- was in it for the money.
"Having gone through a painful divorce and responsible for an ex-wife and several small children, he had ruined his credit and incurred substantial debt, and the Marine Corps had ordered him to submit a monthly report to his commander on how he accounted for his pay in settling those debts," according to a US Defense Department history of the group
".
Interestingly enough, the article does say " ... (show quote)


There is a museum in Chongqing, China housed in the former residence of General Joseph Stillwell dedicated also to the Flying Tigers...https://www.tour-beijing.com/blog/chongqing-travel/flying-tigers-musuem-the-flying-tigers-museum-in-chongqing

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Jul 23, 2020 06:44:20   #
rehess Loc: not here
 
Chian Kho wrote:
There is a museum in Chongqing, China housed in the former residence of General Joseph Stillwell dedicated also to the Flying Tigers...https://www.tour-beijing.com/blog/chongqing-travel/flying-tigers-musuem-the-flying-tigers-museum-in-chongqing

Thank you for your contribution.

Most of us know so little about "back then", and even less about Asia.

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Jul 23, 2020 07:10:27   #
nimbushopper Loc: Tampa, FL
 
Heros and legends!

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Jul 23, 2020 15:02:42   #
Salomj9850
 
My dad was stationed in Chongqing during WW2 and worked as a photographer. Vinegar Joe Stillwell was extremely unpopular with troops, officers and allies. His behavior led to him being relieved of command. Normally when command changes the outgoing commander briefs the new commander. When Wedemeyer actually arrived at Stilwell's headquarters after Stilwell's dismissal, Wedemeyer was dismayed to discover that Stilwell had intentionally departed without seeing him, and did not leave a single briefing paper for his guidance, though departing U.S. military commanders habitually greeted their replacement in order to thoroughly brief them on the strengths and weaknesses of headquarters staff, the issues confronting the command, and planned operations.[77] Searching the offices, Wedemeyer could find no documentary record of Stilwell's plans or records of his former or future operations.[77] General Wedemeyer then spoke with Stilwell's staff officers but learned little from them because Stilwell, according to the staff, kept everything in his "hip pocket".[78]

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Jul 23, 2020 15:58:22   #
MrMikeFRPh Loc: Knoxville. TN
 
My grandfather's brother was a Flying Tigers pilot. I loved listening to his stories at family reunions. Unfortunately, when the last of that generation passed on, so did the reunions.

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Jul 23, 2020 16:23:18   #
rehess Loc: not here
 
MrMikeFRPh wrote:
Unfortunately, when the last of that generation passed on, so did the reunions.

and so did the story telling.

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Jul 23, 2020 16:45:26   #
Bill 45
 
Salomj9850 wrote:
My dad was stationed in Chongqing during WW2 and worked as a photographer. Vinegar Joe Stillwell was extremely unpopular with troops, officers and allies. His behavior led to him being relieved of command. Normally when command changes the outgoing commander briefs the new commander. When Wedemeyer actually arrived at Stilwell's headquarters after Stilwell's dismissal, Wedemeyer was dismayed to discover that Stilwell had intentionally departed without seeing him, and did not leave a single briefing paper for his guidance, though departing U.S. military commanders habitually greeted their replacement in order to thoroughly brief them on the strengths and weaknesses of headquarters staff, the issues confronting the command, and planned operations.[77] Searching the offices, Wedemeyer could find no documentary record of Stilwell's plans or records of his former or future operations.[77] General Wedemeyer then spoke with Stilwell's staff officers but learned little from them because Stilwell, according to the staff, kept everything in his "hip pocket".[78]
My dad was stationed in Chongqing during WW2 and w... (show quote)


Gen. Wedemeyer was a political hack, He would not listed to people who had been in China for years as to what was really going in China. He end up cause more damages than good between America and China. It took years to repair the damage. Stilwell had no use for Wedemeyer and that also goes for Chiang Kaishek, who he look on a just another war lord. Stilwell was old Army who look on his job was to stop the Japanese in China, and not to get into the civil war that was going on in China at the same time as the China-Japanese's war was going on. The civil war was between Chiang Kaishek people and MaoTse-tung people. Chiang Kaishek was holding back troops and supply and money to fight MaoTse-tung people not the Japanese. Stilwell try to put an end to that, but was kick out for doing that.

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Jul 23, 2020 17:28:56   #
Pepsiman Loc: New York City
 
rehess wrote:
Interestingly enough, the article does say "Perhaps the best known of the Flying Tigers, US Marine aviator Greg Boyington -- around whom the 1970's TV show "Black Sheep Squadron" was based -- was in it for the money.
"Having gone through a painful divorce and responsible for an ex-wife and several small children, he had ruined his credit and incurred substantial debt, and the Marine Corps had ordered him to submit a monthly report to his commander on how he accounted for his pay in settling those debts," according to a US Defense Department history of the group
".
Interestingly enough, the article does say " ... (show quote)


Sorry but you are wrong. The black sheep planes were Corsairs, not P 40s...

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Jul 23, 2020 17:49:25   #
rehess Loc: not here
 
Pepsiman wrote:
Sorry but you are wrong. The black sheep planes were Corsairs, not P 40s...

I'm guessing they used "artistic license".
The Corsairs were beautiful planes,

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Jul 23, 2020 20:15:45   #
tomaha.com
 
You are both right - or wrong. Boyington flew P-40s in the AVG and F-4U's with the Marines.

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Jul 23, 2020 20:25:31   #
Pepsiman Loc: New York City
 
Pepsiman wrote:
Sorry but you are wrong. The black sheep planes were Corsairs, not P 40s...


hank you...

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Jul 23, 2020 21:21:11   #
lowkick Loc: Connecticut
 
A friend of mine has the largest private collection of Flying Tiger memorabilia in the world. The Chinese government has flown him there a couple of times to show it, and he has done presentations all over the US. In the process of obtaining the the items he has been in touch with many Flying Tiger members or their families.

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