Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Exuviae of Stream Crusier
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Mar 31, 2020 16:38:17   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
Spending this isolation time re-cataloguing my dragon and damsel shots. I came across this. It's not a photograph. A friend at RPI allowed me to use a high definition flat bed scanner to "photograph" this excuviae. What came from the scan could not be up loaded to most any means to send it. I had to reduce it buy more than half but it still looks fairly sharp. It is the shed skin of a Stream Cruiser (Didymops tranversa) and a photograph of the emergent male adult. The exuviae is the skin or molt left as many Arthropods go from one instar (time between one molt and the next) to another. In dragonflies you may find these on emergent plants or on the bank along the shore as they go from their nymph form to adult dragonflies. This guy is a muddy bottom dweller and they may emerge on the shore instead of an emergent plant like many other Odes. Thus, the mud and sand on this exuviae. This one is quite different to me. As you can see the point of emergence is at the left eye instead of between the wing pads thus a nearly complete molt. They are quite fragile and as you can see this guy is missing 3 tarsal claws. Sorry for getting diarrhea of the keyboard.
I have about 300 exuviae (let's not get into a discussion on what is singular and what is plural) on the microscope table to try to identify to species. Calculus and analytic geometery were easier.
Please stay safe and well!
-Doc
Exuviae of Stream Cruiser Dragonfly
Exuviae of Stream Cruiser Dragonfly...
(Download)
Stream Cruiser (Didymops transversa) M
Stream Cruiser (Didymops transversa) M...
(Download)

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Mar 31, 2020 16:49:23   #
PixelStan77 Loc: Vermont/Chicago
 
docshark wrote:
Spending this isolation time re-cataloguing my dragon and damsel shots. I came across this. It's not a photograph. A friend at RPI allowed me to use a high definition flat bed scanner to "photograph" this excuviae. What came from the scan could not be up loaded to most any means to send it. I had to reduce it buy more than half but it still looks fairly sharp. It is the shed skin of a Stream Cruiser (Didymops tranversa) and a photograph of the emergent male adult. The exuviae is the skin or molt left as many Arthropods go from one instar (time between one molt and the next) to another. In dragonflies you may find these on emergent plants or on the bank along the shore as they go from their nymph form to adult dragonflies. This guy is a muddy bottom dweller and they may emerge on the shore instead of an emergent plant like many other Odes. Thus, the mud and sand on this exuviae. This one is quite different to me. As you can see the point of emergence is at the left eye instead of between the wing pads thus a nearly complete molt. They are quite fragile and as you can see this guy is missing 3 tarsal claws. Sorry for getting diarrhea of the keyboard.
I have about 300 exuviae (let's not get into a discussion on what is singular and what is plural) on the microscope table to try to identify to species. Calculus and analytic geometery were easier.
Please stay safe and well!
-Doc
Spending this isolation time re-cataloguing my dra... (show quote)


Doc thanks for sharing your excuviae experience. Great info and images.Learned a lot.
Stay well and healthy.
Stan

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Mar 31, 2020 16:53:25   #
sippyjug104 Loc: Missouri
 
Amazing images and wonderfully educational narrative.

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Mar 31, 2020 16:56:22   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
PixelStan77 wrote:
Doc thanks for sharing your excuviae experience. Great info and images.Learned a lot.
Stay well and healthy.
Stan


Thank you Stan. It's always good hearing from you. You stay well and healthy too.
-Doc

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Mar 31, 2020 16:57:57   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
sippyjug104 wrote:
Amazing images and wonderfully educational narrative.


Well Gary I really appreciate your fine comments and I always appreciate you looking in and the help you give everyone on this forum. Stay well my friend.
-Doc

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Mar 31, 2020 17:40:19   #
Blenheim Orange Loc: Michigan
 
Thanks for the great images and for sharing your knowledge on the topic.

Mike

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Mar 31, 2020 18:35:20   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
Blenheim Orange wrote:
Thanks for the great images and for sharing your knowledge on the topic.

Mike


I appreciate that Mike but it’s no more than what you and many others on this forum do for each other. Thank you too for what you do make this an amazing group. Please stay safe and well.
Doc

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Mar 31, 2020 20:51:25   #
kpmac Loc: Ragley, La
 
Thanks for the narrative, Doc. And for the two great images.

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Apr 1, 2020 06:14:55   #
EnglishBrenda Loc: Kent, England
 
I think we all enjoy and appreciate your great knowledge and experience on this subject so thanks.

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Apr 1, 2020 12:05:34   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
kpmac wrote:
Thanks for the narrative, Doc. And for the two great images.


Thanks Ken. Glad it was of interest to you. I’m always afraid I may bore people. Have a great day, stay safe and well.
Doc

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Apr 1, 2020 12:08:45   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
EnglishBrenda wrote:
I think we all enjoy and appreciate your great knowledge and experience on this subject so thanks.


Well Brenda I’m glad it was of interest to you. This is that kind of forum. Everyone sharing their interests, expertise and knowledge. So glad to contribute. Stay safe and healthy.
Doc

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Apr 1, 2020 14:02:23   #
rockdog Loc: Berkeley, Ca.
 
docshark wrote:
Spending this isolation time re-cataloguing my dragon and damsel shots. I came across this. It's not a photograph. A friend at RPI allowed me to use a high definition flat bed scanner to "photograph" this excuviae. What came from the scan could not be up loaded to most any means to send it. I had to reduce it buy more than half but it still looks fairly sharp. It is the shed skin of a Stream Cruiser (Didymops tranversa) and a photograph of the emergent male adult. The exuviae is the skin or molt left as many Arthropods go from one instar (time between one molt and the next) to another. In dragonflies you may find these on emergent plants or on the bank along the shore as they go from their nymph form to adult dragonflies. This guy is a muddy bottom dweller and they may emerge on the shore instead of an emergent plant like many other Odes. Thus, the mud and sand on this exuviae. This one is quite different to me. As you can see the point of emergence is at the left eye instead of between the wing pads thus a nearly complete molt. They are quite fragile and as you can see this guy is missing 3 tarsal claws. Sorry for getting diarrhea of the keyboard.
I have about 300 exuviae (let's not get into a discussion on what is singular and what is plural) on the microscope table to try to identify to species. Calculus and analytic geometery were easier.
Please stay safe and well!
-Doc
Spending this isolation time re-cataloguing my dra... (show quote)


Thanks for this interesting post Doc. Good work with the exuviated image, I did not know about the variations on exit points. You should never worry about too much information, we all self select. There are many here who don't even read the title of a post. There are also many here who truly appreciate knowledge that supports our photographic interests. You have a great project for the comming days. And I have a small project trying to learn the difference between excuviae and exuviae/
Keep well my friend!
Phil

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Apr 1, 2020 16:47:18   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
rockdog wrote:
Thanks for this interesting post Doc. Good work with the exuviated image, I did not know about the variations on exit points. You should never worry about too much information, we all self select. There are many here who don't even read the title of a post. There are also many here who truly appreciate knowledge that supports our photographic interests. You have a great project for the comming days. And I have a small project trying to learn the difference between excuviae and exuviae/
Keep well my friend!
Phil
Thanks for this interesting post Doc. Good work wi... (show quote)


Always so good to hear from you my friend. I'm glad you found something of interest in this post. You know what they say about us, "once a teacher.....". I've had 6 dragonfly presentations canceled due to the current pandemic so I guess I felt the need to share. I've been thinking about what you said in your comment and you are right. If people aren't interested in the narrative they can just look at the pictures and read the caption.
Anyway Phil, thanks for your comment and your time. Please stay safe and well. As they used to say on "Hill Street Blues", "Hey, Hey let's be careful out there!"
-Doc

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Apr 1, 2020 17:56:03   #
Mark Sturtevant Loc: Grand Blanc, MI
 
Very interesting! I have seen in a few places where flatbed scanners are used to 'photograph' larger arthropods, and so you are in very good company. I am sure one could scan several at a time, then copy and paste the different images to wherever they need to go. Even put down a paper data label about location and other notes right with them to be scanned along with the specimens.

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Apr 1, 2020 18:25:06   #
docshark Loc: Long Neck, DE
 
Mark Sturtevant wrote:
Very interesting! I have seen in a few places where flatbed scanners are used to 'photograph' larger arthropods, and so you are in very good company. I am sure one could scan several at a time, then copy and paste the different images to wherever they need to go. Even put down a paper data label about location and other notes right with them to be scanned along with the specimens.


Great idea Mark.
-Doc

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