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Wasabi battery won't take a charge
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Sep 16, 2019 12:04:17   #
larryepage
 
Tedster wrote:
Hi, this battery has been charged twice in the past, but suddenly will not take a charge either from a Wasabi charger or a Pentax charger. Anyone know of a way to persuade it?


If the battery is simply over-discharged (can easily happen if a depleted battery is not immediately recharged), I have had some success with a couple of methods:

1--Put the battery on the charger and leave it for an extended period, even if the Charge light is flashing with an error indication. Some chargers will periodically check the battery and send a small (and safe) charging current. In some cases, enough of these small 'doses' of energy over time will increase the voltage of an otherwise good battery sufficiently that the diagnostic function will pronounce the battery healthy and begin the regular charge cycle.

2--Every 5 minutes or so, remove the battery from the charger, wait a few seconds, then reinsert the battery. Repeat this as many times as your patience and peristence will allow. Each time the battery is reinserted, a small (and safe) charging current will be passed into the battery, incrementally increasing the charge level by a small amount. Eventually, the charge level may increase enough that the normal charge cycle will start.

Please note that there is absolutely no guarantee that either of these methods will work. Method 1 has worked for me in some cases with Nikon batteries and failed in other cases. Method 2 has been successful in the distant past recovering NiCad batteries, but has worked only once with a newer technology battery, and to be honest, I don't remember for sure whether it was a NiMH or L-Ion battery. In my experience, they tend to be more successful with OEM batteries with properly matching chips than they do with aftermarket batteries, whose chips may not be programmed correctly or with full functionality.

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Sep 16, 2019 12:12:18   #
Tedster
 
Thanks, the Wasabi batteries work fine in the camera and have for some years. It is just that this particular one won't take a charge.

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Sep 16, 2019 13:17:34   #
jayluber
 
You may need to replace it.

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Sep 16, 2019 14:31:59   #
LXK0930 Loc: Florida and South Jersey
 
FYI:
I was informed that when using rubbing alcohol, make sure it is over 90%. The lesser ones have all kinds of oils added to make them suitable for RUBBING, not CLEANING.

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Sep 16, 2019 15:18:04   #
Tedster
 
Rubbing alcohol? I am guessing you are saying one can use it to clean contacts? On the battery, the charger, both?

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Sep 16, 2019 22:07:06   #
Tedster
 
Yes, but first I want to get that reply about rubbing alcohol.

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Sep 16, 2019 22:16:03   #
TriX Loc: Raleigh, NC
 
LXK0930 wrote:
FYI:
I was informed that when using rubbing alcohol, make sure it is over 90%. The lesser ones have all kinds of oils added to make them suitable for RUBBING, not CLEANING.


Indeed. If you can’t find 99% IPA (Isopropyl Alcohol), a commercial electrical contact cleaner (without a lubricant) is a good choice.

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Sep 16, 2019 22:28:35   #
jayluber
 
Both. But not the contacts you put in your eyes.

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Sep 16, 2019 22:28:36   #
jayluber
 
Both. But not the contacts you put in your eyes.

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Sep 16, 2019 23:02:43   #
ronpier Loc: Poland Ohio
 
Silverrails wrote:
Not sure what Camera brand you own, but it has been highly suggested to me that you should Only use OEM batteries in the Camera brand you own, Nikon Camera use Nikon Batteries, Canon Camera use Canon batteries, etc.
I have a Nikon D3300 and 3 EN-EL14a OEM Nikon Batteries, have not Experienced any issues in the past 3 years.
You might save money with "Off-Brand" batteries, but they may not perform well or even possibly damage your camera.


I have two Promaster replacement batteries that seem to work OK but would probably use OEM replacements in the future. Not much of a price difference to make going off brand worthwhile as a cost savings.

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Sep 17, 2019 00:37:48   #
Tedster
 
This is a lithium-ion one, but with the several suggestions, I now have several things to try: rubbing the contacts with rubbing alcohol, and your suggestion of the in-and-out of the charger method. I have already tried the long-period attempt to charge it, leaving it in there for 6 hrs and having it still tell me it was dead. Someone said that they have some sort of built-in "thing" that keeps them from being totally depleted. Hope so, as how can I prevent that when my camera only tells me "it has a charge" or "it has no charge"? Thanks for the new method.

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Sep 17, 2019 02:59:07   #
Srodick
 
I've restored seemingly dead li ion power tool batteries. You'll need a good battery of the same voltage (or marginally higher, e.g. bad battery 12v, good battery 12, 14, or 18v). Connect a jumper to both negative terminals. Connect a jumper to the positive terminal on the good battery ONLY. With the other end of the jumper quickly sweep the positive terminal on the bad battery two or three times. Put on charger and see if it charges. If not, throw it away. Of course it's a good idea to wear safety glasses and gloves when you do this.

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Sep 17, 2019 08:20:55   #
Scruples Loc: Brooklyn, New York
 
First off, I don't mind third party lenses if I have used it prior. For other accessories, I tend to ask my compatriots for their experience with non-OEM products. As for batteries, I prefer original equipment manufacturer batteries. I don't want to risk a battery leak as done in the past. I currently have six for my full frame Canon with two Canon Chargers.
By the way, if a battery is no longer usable, don't throw it away. Please recycle it at the camera store, Home Depot or Lowe's.

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Sep 17, 2019 09:16:30   #
mikegreenwald Loc: Illinois
 
TomV wrote:
I buy only OEM. I have bought Wasabi & Power2000, etc in the past but they always fail much earlier than OEM. I have never had OEM failures in 15 yrs.


Likewise.

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Sep 17, 2019 10:36:49   #
larryepage
 
Tedster wrote:
This is a lithium-ion one, but with the several suggestions, I now have several things to try: rubbing the contacts with rubbing alcohol, and your suggestion of the in-and-out of the charger method. I have already tried the long-period attempt to charge it, leaving it in there for 6 hrs and having it still tell me it was dead. Someone said that they have some sort of built-in "thing" that keeps them from being totally depleted. Hope so, as how can I prevent that when my camera only tells me "it has a charge" or "it has no charge"? Thanks for the new method.
This is a lithium-ion one, but with the several su... (show quote)


The chip will prevent excessive discharge under load, but cannot protect against self-discharge. It's not totally clear from your original post and follow ups, but I have deduced that your batteries are several years old and may have gone for long periods without use. In this situation, they can discharge well beyond lower limits. If the unused period was long, they can be a long way below the lower charge threshold. By the way...for the extended charge trial, a much longer period than the 6 hours you mentioned will be necessary...probably more like a minimum of 24-48 hours or maybe even longer. But if the batteries really are several years old, I'd tend to favor retirement, recycling, and replacement. Even if you can bring the failed battery back to life, its performance will likely be very seriously degraded even if you can get it to the point of being rechargeable.

Please, please, please do not ever use "rubbing alcohol" for cleaning any electronic device. In addition to the water that almost all alcohol is diluted with, rubbing alcohol contains oils and sometimes all sorts of other additives that can be damaging or at least detrimental to electronic equipment. 90% Isopropyl Alcohol is the preferred choice, but it can be hard to find.

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