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Shooting in Raw
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Jun 10, 2019 10:18:38   #
lonniedawes
 
I want to learn how to shoot in RAW, never done it before. Where is a good place to start how to shoot in Raw?

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Jun 10, 2019 10:23:26   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
Set your camera to shoot RAW.

Then import the RAW files to your computer. What software do you have on you computer? What version? And, what camera do you have?

What are you expecting to see by using RAW captures?

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Jun 10, 2019 10:23:29   #
CHG_CANON (a regular here)
 
lonniedawes wrote:
I want to learn how to shoot in RAW, never done it before. Where is a good place to start how to shoot in Raw?


Try your camera ...

Seriously, it has less to do with the capture process and more to do with the editing process as now you're responsible for all the processing (noise, sharpening, contrast, highlights and shadows, WB) that the camera used to perform for you when creating the JPEG.

So, decide what your software will be your tool. If you haven't done this already, download (if needed) and install the software that came with the camera. Then, google utube and RAW for your software and find instructional videos.

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Jun 10, 2019 10:30:26   #
lonniedawes
 
I am shooting with canon 80D, I have canon software, elements 2018, and lightroom 5.7

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Jun 10, 2019 10:32:22   #
Old Timer
 
Set your camera to raw and jpg both and then download and process your raws in program that edits raw files. Takes some time to start with but worth effort in my opinion as that is all I use. If you have Canon software their is the best I have found for Canon files. You are all set.

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Jun 10, 2019 10:33:10   #
via the lens (a regular here)
 
lonniedawes wrote:
I want to learn how to shoot in RAW, never done it before. Where is a good place to start how to shoot in Raw?


If you decide to shoot using RAW then you would also need to be adept in processing. A RAW image is intended to be processed by you, the photographer, not the camera as would happen with a JPEG. There is no difference in taking the image, other than the opportunity to capture additional tones on the light side.

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Jun 10, 2019 10:35:29   #
lonniedawes
 
Thanks all for comments

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Jun 10, 2019 10:36:03   #
nj53
 
RAW is the way to go, especially if you want to do meaningful post processing. the only "down" side in my opinion is that the files are bigger than jpg files on your computer and you get less # of pics on your SD card. pretty small downsize.

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Jun 10, 2019 10:39:00   #
CHG_CANON (a regular here)
 
lonniedawes wrote:
I am shooting with canon 80D, I have canon software, elements 2018, and lightroom 5.7


Unfortunately, your LR5 won't directly support your EOS 80D CR2s. If you download the latest point update to DPPv4, you'll have the best starting point of the Canon software. But, PSE isn't a good "finishing" tool for 16-bit TIFFs from DPP because most of the edit tools in PSE for the image down to 8-bit. You're kind of in that grey area between software .... You can output 16-TIFFs from DPP and bring them into your LR5 software for finishing.

I prefer LR to either PSE (any version) and DPP. Rather than DPPv4, you might google, find and download Adobe's DNG converter. Converting your CR2s to DNGs will make the files (the DNGs) compatible with your LR5 software, the most powerful vs DPP and PSE.

If you're serious about shooting RAW, you need a tool that works with the RAW files directly rather than via preliminary conversion steps.

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Jun 10, 2019 11:11:05   #
quixdraw (a regular here)
 
IMO, the big thing here is that you have to really like Post Processing. I switched to shooting RAW for several months a couple of years ago on the advice of a good friend. It just wasn't for me. I was nearly always pleased with JPEG fine, and RAW really slowed things down. That combined with the fact that I retired from a computer intense job was the final negative - I just wasn't into the post processing. It is different for everyone - in your case, may be just what the doctor ordered. Best of luck!

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Jun 10, 2019 11:23:15   #
repleo (a regular here)
 
The question is not how to shoot in RAW. The question should be how to post process RAW. Unprocessed RAW images can be very disappointing. However, it is definitely worth while to learn even some basic PP techniques and move to RAW.

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Jun 10, 2019 11:54:49   #
Linda From Maine (a regular here)
 
repleo wrote:
Unprocessed RAW images can be very disappointing...
Raw are meant to be processed by the photographer using editing software, so there should be no disappointment if one understands what a raw file is relative to a jpg that the camera processes.

Personally, I'm disappointed that my camera doesn't clean my house 😇

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Jun 10, 2019 11:59:56   #
BebuLamar (a regular here)
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
Raw are meant to be processed by the photographer using editing software, so there should be no disappointment if one understands what a raw file is relative to a jpg that the camera processes.

Personally, I'm disappointed that my camera doesn't clean my house 😇


Bought the wrong camera Linda. The way my wife did, she bought the camera for me and I clean the house for her.

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Jun 10, 2019 14:43:14   #
repleo (a regular here)
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
Raw are meant to be processed by the photographer using editing software, so there should be no disappointment if one understands what a raw file is relative to a jpg that the camera processes.

Personally, I'm disappointed that my camera doesn't clean my house 😇


I'm disappointed that our Romba doesn't take pictures - so I could catch my wife with her feet up all day !!

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Jun 10, 2019 18:14:26   #
Kaib795 (a regular here)
 
RAW images are untouched files that cannot be changed. You'll always have them to go back on later if you need to change or do something different. But they remain untouched and usually flat looking (which is good as there will be more tonal range to play with). I am from a commercial printing background and have worked with many different file formats on Mac and PC computers. RAW files are also big files. Your working files will also be big files (these are the files saved from Photoshop or whatever software you end up using). The jpgs you save will be small to very small files (they are compressed files). You can save them as low resolution 72 lpi for online viewing and a high resolution size of 300 lpi. You can save them as sRGB for online viewing (a profile that matches the color space of your monitor) or adobe RGB for printing (a larger color space that will look slightly flat on a monitor but not designed for that purpose). You do have to edit them to make them great but it's easy and you'll have more retained detail in the RAW file than ever in a jpg. You can also save files as tiff files - they retain all pixel data and will be your largest files but only high end commercial printers may request them. Bottom line, you can save both RAW and jpg files as you shoot. If you go the RAW way, you will be opening the post editing doors to a new world.

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