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fungus in lens
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Feb 14, 2019 10:20:09   #
Lennyj
 
Hi all just wondering is there any way to keep lenses fungus free? I have been looking for a micro lens for my nikon d3500. A lot of the used lenses state lens fungus. Can it be cleaned or just keep looking? Thanks

Lenny

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Feb 14, 2019 10:24:42   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
I'd keep looking. The lens would have to be dis-assembled to properly clean it. (At what cost to do so?)

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Feb 14, 2019 10:26:00   #
CHG_CANON (a regular here)
 
Keep looking. To protect your own equipment, don't live / store your equipment in a humid environment and never in a leather bag / case for extended periods. Airtight bags with moisture-absorbing silica gel packs can help if you can't move north.

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Feb 14, 2019 10:28:34   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
Lennyj wrote:
Hi all just wondering is there any way to keep lenses fungus free? I have been looking for a micro lens for my nikon d3500. A lot of the used lenses state lens fungus. Can it be cleaned or just keep looking? Thanks

Lenny

Keep on looking! fungus infection can spread under the right conditions

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Feb 14, 2019 11:00:35   #
PixelStan77 (a regular here)
 
Lennyj wrote:
Hi all just wondering is there any way to keep lenses fungus free? I have been looking for a micro lens for my nikon d3500. A lot of the used lenses state lens fungus. Can it be cleaned or just keep looking? Thanks

Lenny
Lenny, Keep looking. Cannot be cleaned at a reasonable cost because of total disassembly.

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Feb 14, 2019 11:10:02   #
Gene51 (a regular here)
 
Lennyj wrote:
Hi all just wondering is there any way to keep lenses fungus free? I have been looking for a micro lens for my nikon d3500. A lot of the used lenses state lens fungus. Can it be cleaned or just keep looking? Thanks

Lenny


Fungus feeds on the organic "glue" that is used to attach some lens elements to others - fungus will get in between the elements and spread.

Silica packs and other dessicants are pretty much worthless. They will only work in a sealed environment. If you resort to putting your lenses in plastic bags - this is not a better solution - most plastic bags will "out-gas" as they age, releasing particulates that accumulate on all surfaces they come in contact with - including glass.

Your only solution is to keep your lenses in an air conditioned or dehumidified room.

Do not even accept a free fungus-ed lens - it can contaminate your other lenses.

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Feb 14, 2019 11:15:47   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
Gene51 wrote:
Fungus feeds on the organic "glue" that is used to attach some lens elements to others - fungus will get in between the elements and spread.

Silica packs and other dessicants are pretty much worthless. They will only work in a sealed environment. If you resort to putting your lenses in plastic bags - this is not a better solution - most plastic bags will "out-gas" as they age, releasing particulates that accumulate on all surfaces they come in contact with - including glass.

Your only solution is to keep your lenses in an air conditioned or dehumidified room.

Do not even accept a free fungus-ed lens - it can contaminate your other lenses.
Fungus feeds on the organic "glue" that ... (show quote)


All of the above. Plus the fungus critter can etch the class.

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Feb 14, 2019 12:32:59   #
rook2c4
 
Rich1939 wrote:
Keep on looking! fungus infection can spread under the right conditions


If the fungus is spreading, you've got bigger problems than the lens. It means the conditions are highly favorable to fungus growth and need to be fixed.

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Feb 14, 2019 12:47:55   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
rook2c4 wrote:
If the fungus is spreading, you've got bigger problems than the lens. It means the conditions are highly favorable to fungus growth and need to be fixed.


No doubt! . There are far too many places where the conditions are difficult to control, and if you never introduce an infected lens, that's one less reason for a fungus to start

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Feb 14, 2019 13:05:53   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
There are plenty of lenses without fungus. Just keep looking.

http://www.beyondphototips.com/2008/10/19/humidity-fungus-and-cameras-problems-solutions/

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Feb 14, 2019 13:29:26   #
rook2c4
 
Rich1939 wrote:
No doubt! . There are far too many places where the conditions are difficult to control, and if you never introduce an infected lens, that's one less reason for a fungus to start


No, that is not how it works! Any trained microbiologist will tell you this. The lens is not introducing anything which isn't already there. Fungus is not the same as a virus or bacteria. Fungus spores are already all around us, in the air and on surfaces - waiting for the right conditions. If a lens with fungus growth is present or not is irrelevant. Right conditions, then fungus grows. Of course some people are quick to blame it on the lens, as they cannot see the spores that are everywhere. But the environmental conditions are the real culprit.

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Feb 14, 2019 14:31:19   #
Dr.Nikon (a regular here)
 
Oh ...

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Feb 14, 2019 14:35:11   #
wilsondl2
 
jerryc41 wrote:
There are plenty of lenses without fungus. Just keep looking.

http://www.beyondphototips.com/2008/10/19/humidity-fungus-and-cameras-problems-solutions/

What Jerry said. I found a 55mm Nikon Mocro with 1:1 extender with just a few wear marks on front threads for $28 on eBay. It will auto expose on A. Must focus manual but many do for Macro work anyway. Good Luck! - Dave

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Feb 14, 2019 17:17:37   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
rook2c4 wrote:
No, that is not how it works! Any trained microbiologist will tell you this. The lens is not introducing anything which isn't already there. Fungus is not the same as a virus or bacteria. Fungus spores are already all around us, in the air and on surfaces - waiting for the right conditions. If a lens with fungus growth is present or not is irrelevant. Right conditions, then fungus grows. Of course some people are quick to blame it on the lens, as they cannot see the spores that are everywhere. But the environmental conditions are the real culprit.
No, that is not how it works! Any trained microbio... (show quote)


I stand corrected

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Feb 14, 2019 22:43:30   #
jcspics
 
Rich1939 wrote:
I stand corrected


One thing that I've found in my research about this is fungus grows in dark, humid, warm environments. A "real-world" and technically free preventive maintenance ritual for those that have to live in low lands/swampy places is to pick a warm summer afternoon take off the caps, open the aperture up, then allow sunshine to pass through the lens for 5-10 min which kills any live spores. (NOT ATTACHED TO CAMERA)

That seemed to pass my "sniff" test as a way to stop existing fungus from spreading using a natural method and keep it from getting a toe-hold where it isn't an issue yet. My only proof so far is that my bathroom grout has mold/fungus issues and other than an OLD 80-200mm f/2.8 that was 'out of sight-out of mind' too long (4 years in the back of a closet) my other lenses haven't show signs of mold.

Yes/No thoughts on that... I don't do this unless high temps are only in the 80s so no 104 F summer afternoon.

Thanks,
Jim Cameron
JCStudio Photography

IG: @jcstudiopics

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