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5 Quick Tips for Photographing the Moon From Nikon
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Jan 17, 2019 23:02:23   #
LarryFB
 
Machinedoc wrote:
Alas, there is no camera setting that will compensate for the weather that is expected in the Northeast!!!


I agree but would add: Southeast, Southwest, Northwest, or any other general location depending on local conditions!

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Jan 17, 2019 23:11:56   #
LarryFB
 
foxfirerodandgun wrote:
Here are the best 3 of 18 images, (heavily cropped), of the moon that I took last night. I'm really not happy with either of them, but considering that the lens is a Nikkor 18-300mm, f/3.5-5.6, and that it tends to be somewhat soft at 300mm I was not expecting the same results that a high end/prime lens would produce. At least I now know what settings did not work.


I look at all three photos and they are good. I also noticed that all three (with minor deviations) follow the "Lunar 11 rule" for exposure: that is F/11 at a shutter speed of 1/ISO. It may not be exact in all cases, but it sure is a great starting point,

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Jan 17, 2019 23:58:45   #
foxfirerodandgun
 
LarryFB wrote:
I look at all three photos and they are good. I also noticed that all three (with minor deviations) follow the "Lunar 11 rule" for exposure: that is F/11 at a shutter speed of 1/ISO. It may not be exact in all cases, but it sure is a great starting point,


Thanks for the kind words. I was hoping for a bit sharper images, but as mentioned, maybe I was expecting to much from this particular lens. I would like to have a fast 500mm or 600mm lens but my pockets aren't quite that deep yet. I'll have to start saving now.

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Jan 18, 2019 10:38:02   #
Gordon322
 
Another sad viewer in Massachusetts here.
I would try some with my Meade 2080 ( = 2000mm fl, 8 inch diameter F/10 ) but it's really hard to get anything through the clouds...

Just remember that the eclipsed moon is quite a bit darker than the illuminated part. Evaluate exposure with every shot during totality. You'll need multiple stops more exposure.

If there are some clouds nearby, then take two shots, one for the moon and another for the clouds and replace the overexposed moon in the cloud shot with the properly exposed moon.

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Jan 18, 2019 11:53:58   #
RatGMAN
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
The first time I shot a full moonset in morning light, I could not believe how fast it disappeared as it touched the horizon line. You can easily see the movement in your viewfinder.


No different than a sunrise/sunset. Definitely see the motion in the viewfinder.

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Jan 19, 2019 23:49:53   #
torchman310
 
BebuLamar wrote:
They didn't tell us how to focus to infinity. On Nikon AF lenses it's difficult to set focus to infinity.


Turn the auto focus on the camera off. If your lens has a focus switch, set to off.

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Jan 20, 2019 13:45:25   #
Bobspez
 
Personally I favor the lowest iso (least noise), widest available aperture (most light), and raising the shutter speed until I see the best live view, with prominent shadows and minimized blown out areas.

Taken with the Coolpix B700. Iso-100, f6.5, 1/500 sec., focal length 361mm, equivalent focal length 1440mm, autofocus.
foxfirerodandgun wrote:
Thanks everyone for your input & comments. My thoughts would be to switch to manual focus & focus to infinity, f/11, [nothing to be concerned about the DOF Linda :~)], starting with ISO 200 and possibly going to 400, starting with ss of 1/250 and possibly trying one a bit slower & one a bit faster, and spot meter on the moon before each shot. This will be my first attempt at a moon shot. Comments?


(Download)

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