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Would f/5.6 - 8 - 11 Been A Beter Choice?
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Jan 11, 2019 10:44:49   #
AzPicLady (a regular here)
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
OP says, "most of the images seemed to be underexposed."


Oh, Oops. Sorry Linda. Some day I'll learn to read!

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Jan 11, 2019 10:47:00   #
olemikey (a regular here)
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
In aperture priority, every time you changed the aperture, the camera changed the shutter speed so that you ended up with the same exposure. You would have to use the exposure compensation feature or go to all manual settings as user autofocus suggests.

Like your dappled-light abandoned car in the woods, some of these photos have bright sun and deep shadows in the same image, so if shooting in jpg with little to no editing, you're faced with decisions on what part of the scene should get the most light.

Your metering mode says "Multi-segment" in an exif reader I used. I'm not familiar, but perhaps you should try some controlled tests using spot metering. Olemikey mentions doing extensive testing for additional technical considerations. Much to think about!
In aperture priority, every time you changed the a... (show quote)


I didn't look at the exif data, but sounds to me that Linda has hit the nail squarely!!

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Jan 11, 2019 10:50:18   #
Thomas902 (a regular here)
 
"...The time was roughly 12:00 - 12:30 PM..." where in lays an issue... go back at either dawn or twilight... This is laterally "Golden" for Architectural renderings... You gain wonderful bias relief not to mention a surreal color palette...

Shoot with "quartering" light to capitalize on the breathtaking illumination latent in the ethereal surreal illumination in that fleeting "crack" between night/day...

That said if you are confronted with mother nature's "Softbox" a.k.a. heavy overcast then the world is your oyster... shoot wide open with long glass to isolate and convert to B&W...

Final thoughts? Why worry about exposure? Bracket by at least several stops over/under... and while you're at it do so on a tripod and use the results in HDR software to review detail far beyond the dynamic range of even the most pricey high end kit... Your D7200 is certain very capable of the aforementioned...

Hope this helps...
I wish you well on your journey foxfirerodandgun

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Jan 11, 2019 11:09:33   #
Thomas902 (a regular here)
 
A more general note: In this Forum I'm reading a myriad of complaints about the "kit" not yielding the results desired... Folks, please get over it, seriously... It's not the "kit" it is the photographer who chooses the very best time to photograph and how to illuminate to achieve the desired visual statement... There are exception such as shooting events where one does not have the luxury to shoot at an opportune hour or ideal illumination scenario... In those cases it is the photographer's task to match the optic to the conditions and set the camera to optimize outcomes...

Best Advice? Learn what lens work in which illumination scenarios and how to ameliorate challenges associated with same...

A candid observation from decades on the commercial side of the equation...
Only event shooters use Zoom optics... Primes are the overwhelming choice of all the other commercial togs I've had the privilege to assist...

enough said...

Hope this helps...
Or is at least food for thought

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Jan 11, 2019 11:32:52   #
foxfirerodandgun
 
Thomas902 wrote:
"...The time was roughly 12:00 - 12:30 PM..." where in lays an issue... go back at either dawn or twilight... This is laterally "Golden" for Architectural renderings... You gain wonderful bias relief not to mention a surreal color palette...

Shoot with "quartering" light to capitalize on the breathtaking illumination latent in the ethereal surreal illumination in that fleeting "crack" between night/day...

That said if you are confronted with mother nature's "Softbox" a.k.a. heavy overcast then the world is your oyster... shoot wide open with long glass to isolate and convert to B&W...

Final thoughts? Why worry about exposure? Bracket by at least several stops over/under... and while you're at it do so on a tripod and use the results in HDR software to review detail far beyond the dynamic range of even the most pricey high end kit... Your D7200 is certain very capable of the aforementioned...

Hope this helps...
I wish you well on your journey foxfirerodandgun
"...The time was roughly 12:00 - 12:30 PM...&... (show quote)


Aslways Thomas902 thank you for your input. I wanted to get out much earlier that I did and catch some of the earlier light but other things took priority. Here is a shot taken about 2:00 pm the of a building not far from my home that once was a bustling business before I-95 came along. It also has a full basement. If I interpret the histogram correctly it seems to be exposed OK I guess, however, the entire shot just looks to dark to me. Comments?


(Download)

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Jan 11, 2019 12:09:33   #
autofocus
 
foxfirerodandgun wrote:
Aslways Thomas902 thank you for your input. I wanted to get out much earlier that I did and catch some of the earlier light but other things took priority. Here is a shot taken about 2:00 pm the of a building not far from my home that once was a bustling business before I-95 came along. It also has a full basement. If I interpret the histogram correctly it seems to be exposed OK I guess, however, the entire shot just looks to dark to me. Comments?


in a mixed light situation like this it's basically a balance between getting the bright areas well exposed along with the darker shadowy areas. The camera has done a pretty good job of it, and there's not much more you can do to make it dramatically better. Corrective fixes can be done in editing, however, and can improve things some.

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Jan 11, 2019 12:58:25   #
speters (a regular here)
 
foxfirerodandgun wrote:
I was out yesterday shooting old dilapidated farm buildings and the farm house on an abandoned farm with my D7200. It was a cold (35º with a stiff & steady breeze); sunny "Blue Bird" day; clear with no clouds. Using Aperture Priority, I shot one set of each building @f/22 and then f/16 for comparison and a good depth of field. When I downloaded the images I wasn't pleased with the results and surmised that a wider aperture would have given me much better results since most of the images seemed to be underexposed. My question is what aperture in these conditions would have most likely produced properly exposed images, f/5.6, 8, 11? I'm sort of leaning towards f/8. The examples below are straight from the camera. The time was roughly 12:00 - 12:30 PM and I am facing West. The time & date are incorrect in the EXIF. Comments welcomed.
I was out yesterday shooting old dilapidated farm ... (show quote)

Why, when you shoot a flat wall, you do not need a large DOF?

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Jan 11, 2019 13:34:38   #
foxfirerodandgun
 
My question was more about exposure than DOF. In a previous post I explained my misconseption of aperture size affecting eexposure vs DOF,

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Jan 11, 2019 22:03:23   #
Picture Taker (a regular here)
 
With HDR you (in my set up) shoot the proper exposure the with the same f stop shoo + 2 stops and - 2stops. I merge them in Photomatix but they have others. What this does takes the details that the over and under expose and merge them to give you a picture with much less over and under exposed portions showing. Your eyes see about 10 time as much more dark to light as you camera shot. The HDR will decrease the difference and in your shots the background was light and bright but the barn was dark this will balance them out.

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Jan 12, 2019 10:24:10   #
agillot
 
looking at the 3 pics , f22 look more pleasing .slight difference in exposure on 1 and 3 .

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Jan 12, 2019 11:14:19   #
philo
 
For this image i think that dof is a mute point. weather you shoot a f4 or f22 and you focus on the barn they are all going to look the same.

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Jan 12, 2019 15:58:44   #
boberic (a regular here)
 
Linda From Maine wrote:
In aperture priority, every time you changed the aperture, the camera changed the shutter speed so that you ended up with the same exposure. You would have to use the exposure compensation feature or go to all manual settings as user autofocus suggests.

Like your dappled-light abandoned car in the woods, some of these photos have bright sun and deep shadows in the same image, so if shooting in jpg with little to no editing, you're faced with decisions on what part of the scene should get the most light.

Your metering mode says "Multi-segment" in an exif reader I used. I'm not familiar, but perhaps you should try some controlled tests using spot metering. Olemikey mentions doing extensive testing for additional technical considerations. Much to think about!
In aperture priority, every time you changed the a... (show quote)


Spot metering is exactly what I was thinking. With evaluative metering the meter will read the bright sky as well as the building, and may ciome to the wrong decision regarding the farm house.

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Jan 12, 2019 19:41:46   #
Curmudgeon (a regular here)
 
[quote=foxfirerodandgun]Thank you for your detailed explanation. Yes, I struggle to fully understand the exposure triangle and its interactions. Along with aperture= +/-DOF, I was also thinking narrower aperture=less light / wider aperture=more light thus under/over exposure not realizing that the camera is making shutter speed adjustments to compensate for my aperture adjustments. And, if I understand this correctly, in Shutter mode the camera compensates shutter speed changes with aperture changes.

Thank you. I think we both got it now. By using any priority mode A/P/ISO and changing any one value, no matter by how much, the visual picture/image is going to LOOK the same.

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Jan 12, 2019 19:49:49   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
Quite truthfully, I gave up on a comparison as soon as you changed the subject of the photographs.
--Bob
foxfirerodandgun wrote:
I was out yesterday shooting old dilapidated farm buildings and the farm house on an abandoned farm with my D7200. It was a cold (35º with a stiff & steady breeze); sunny "Blue Bird" day; clear with no clouds. Using Aperture Priority, I shot one set of each building @f/22 and then f/16 for comparison and a good depth of field. When I downloaded the images I wasn't pleased with the results and surmised that a wider aperture would have given me much better results since most of the images seemed to be underexposed. My question is what aperture in these conditions would have most likely produced properly exposed images, f/5.6, 8, 11? I'm sort of leaning towards f/8. The examples below are straight from the camera. The time was roughly 12:00 - 12:30 PM and I am facing West. The time & date are incorrect in the EXIF. Comments welcomed.
I was out yesterday shooting old dilapidated farm ... (show quote)

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Jan 12, 2019 23:16:14   #
foxfirerodandgun
 
rmalarz wrote:
Quite truthfully, I gave up on a comparison as soon as you changed the subject of the photographs.
--Bob


May I ask changed from what to what? It was originally about exposure and me trying to understand the effects that changing aperture settings had on each image and if other aperture settings would have improved them. I guess it morphed into learning more about how the interactions of each component of the exposure triangle effects the others. Whatever the case, I now have a much better understanding of how each element can effect the others depending on which mode the photographer is using. I hope others who may have wanted to clarify how to use these settings may have benefited from this thread. Thanks.

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