Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
printer calibrations
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Jan 10, 2019 18:22:52   #
more-or-less
 
I am currently printing to a wide format Canon ipf 765. The printed color matches my monitor extremely well.
I now have an additional printer an Epson R3000. Prints from this printer are very different from the Canon / Monitor.
Is there a way to match the output of the Epson to the Canon and my monitor without screwing with the Canon and/or my monitor.
In other words can I somehow calibrate the Epson output to match the rest.

| Reply
Jan 10, 2019 18:36:07   #
jdubu
 
Depends... are you calibrating your monitor, or is it just happenstance that the Canon and the monitor are close in color match?

If you calibrate your system, then it doesn't matter what printer you add or use, as long as the printing software controls color and not the printer you use. No calibration... forget trying to get the same output from different printers.

| Reply
Jan 10, 2019 18:39:42   #
Rich1939 (a regular here)
 
more-or-less wrote:
I am currently printing to a wide format Canon ipf 765. The printed color matches my monitor extremely well.
I now have an additional printer an Epson R3000. Prints from this printer are very different from the Canon / Monitor.
Is there a way to match the output of the Epson to the Canon and my monitor without screwing with the Canon and/or my monitor.
In other words can I somehow calibrate the Epson output to match the rest.

Although I don't know the answer to your question, I'll be watching to see what answers you get. I use a R3000 and it and my calibrated monitor are a close match. I do let PS control the printing but maybe when using two different printers one will have to be set up to let the printer control the process. Interesting.

| Reply
Jan 10, 2019 18:45:10   #
more-or-less
 
jdubu wrote:
Depends... are you calibrating your monitor, or is it just happenstance that the Canon and the monitor are close in color match?

If you calibrate your system, then it doesn't matter what printer you add or use, as long as the printing software controls color and not the printer you use. No calibration... forget trying to get the same output from different printers.


I haven't had to calibrate anything. They just matched from the start.

| Reply
Jan 10, 2019 18:56:05   #
more-or-less
 
more-or-less wrote:
I haven't had to calibrate anything. They just matched from the start.


I have also tried letting the software PS manage the printing. No change in the output

| Reply
Jan 10, 2019 19:13:47   #
jdubu
 
more-or-less wrote:
I haven't had to calibrate anything. They just matched from the start.


Then it was just luck that they matched enough to satisfy you. without a calibrated system, you will never get two different printers to match colors. If you ever do, then you should buy a lottery ticket because you would be the luckiest person out there.

Calibrating your monitor gives you a base point that the software can match your printer's colors to, using ICC profiles. These profiles are available from the printer manufacturer expressly for that purpose.

| Reply
Jan 10, 2019 19:24:20   #
jdubu
 
Rich1939 wrote:
Although I don't know the answer to your question, I'll be watching to see what answers you get. I use a R3000 and it and my calibrated monitor are a close match. I do let PS control the printing but maybe when using two different printers one will have to be set up to let the printer control the process. Interesting.


Your system is calibrated, so it doesn't matter what printer you use, as long as you use the proper ICC profile and let PS always control the print process. Letting the printer control means the printer will ignore your monitor's calibration.

| Reply
Jan 10, 2019 22:56:14   #
TomV
 
The Epson is a 9-ink system while the Canon is a 5-ink system. I would calibrate my monitor with something like a ColorMunki and ensure the Epson works well with that. I would assume the Epson is spot-on. It would be my standard, not the Canon.

As has been suggested, ensure the sw manages the colors. Use the correct paper profile for your system (printer and paper). For Canon you can get that from the Canon website (search for Canon ICC). Quality paper manufacturers will offer them for selected photo printers.

Another important parameter to this printing effort is making sure you are reviewing the print under good light conditions otherwise the print will not come close to matching the monitor. I use an OttLite task lite and it makes a world of difference in revealing the subtle colors in a quality print. There are other lighting solutions but it works well to match up my Dell U2715H IPS monitor with my Canon Pixma Pro-100.

I have more details on how I setup my system in the Printing section of this forum.

| Reply
Jan 11, 2019 08:36:42   #
NBBPH
 
You must calibrate your monitor first and then calibrate your printer for each type of paper you use. I use the Color Munki system and it works well. I have two different printers, one a 10 ink (pigment), the other a 5 ink (dye) machine. Both match the monitor well but not perfectly - and they never will match perfectly because they are different color systems with different gamuts. The prints from both printers are satisfactory but they do not match perfectly, and they never will, because they use different colorants and have different gamuts. The goal is to get prints that mimic closely what you see on the monitor and that satisfy your requirements.

| Reply
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2019 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.