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Digital Camera: Battery Eater
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Jan 10, 2019 17:05:31   #
Quinn 4
 
Founded this web site "Our Essential Guide to Batteries" The web site point out any kind of digital camera will run down one batteries in short time. The best one can do is use nickel-metal hydridge battery which can be recharger. Use a smart chargers to recharger the battery. I found at Walmark web site a Universal Battery Charger. Is this fact or fake news, if it is fact it is not talk about when dealing with digital camera, in fact more like not writing about.

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Jan 10, 2019 17:18:54   #
Mac
 
Quinn 4 wrote:
Founded this web site "Our Essential Guide to Batteries" The web site point out any kind of digital camera will run down one batteries in short time. The best one can do is use nickel-metal hydridge battery which can be recharger. Use a smart chargers to recharger the battery. I found at Walmark web site a Universal Battery Charger. Is this fact or fake news, if it is fact it is not talk about when dealing with digital camera, in fact more like not writing about.


I guess it depends on how you define short time, and how many shots you take.
I usually carry a spare battery with me though rarely need it.

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Jan 10, 2019 17:29:58   #
CHG_CANON (a regular here)
 
Reading your posting history, it's unclear if you have a digital camera. What type of battery does it use? How many images can you typically capture before it needs a recharge? If you turn the camera off for an extended period of time, how long (hours, days, or weeks) does it take to discharge the battery when not in use? When you read the brands and models of camera-specific batteries, does the packaging for a universal charger reference your model of camera or model of battery?

These questions should lead you to an understanding of the issue and potential utility of a universal charger. Regarding battery eating, can you shoot with your digital camera for the duration of a single day starting at a full charge? If you can't, would that seem "short"? If you can't leave your camera off for a week without the battery completely discharging, does that seem too short?

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Jan 10, 2019 17:49:39   #
cameraf4 (a regular here)
 
Call me Mr. Cautious but I only use Original Manufacturer Batteries in my $3000.00 cameras. However, I have noticed that the EN-EL15 battery I have left from my old Nikon D800 works but does not last as long in my D850 as do the EN-EL15a batteries.

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Jan 10, 2019 18:04:49   #
Bill_de (a regular here)
 
Quinn 4 wrote:
Founded this web site "Our Essential Guide to Batteries" The web site point out any kind of digital camera will run down one batteries in short time. The best one can do is use nickel-metal hydridge battery which can be recharger. Use a smart chargers to recharger the battery. I found at Walmark web site a Universal Battery Charger. Is this fact or fake news, if it is fact it is not talk about when dealing with digital camera, in fact more like not writing about.


A couple of things.

The article that came up when I Googled that title is 5 years old.
The statement you mentioned was specifically for AA batteries.

But, for AA batteries I agree and use Eneloop batteries and chargers.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1047691-REG/panasonic_bk_3mcca16ba_eneloop_aa_16_pack_2100.html

--

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Jan 10, 2019 18:17:19   #
JohnSwanda (a regular here)
 
Quinn 4 wrote:
Founded this web site "Our Essential Guide to Batteries" The web site point out any kind of digital camera will run down one batteries in short time. The best one can do is use nickel-metal hydridge battery which can be recharger. Use a smart chargers to recharger the battery. I found at Walmark web site a Universal Battery Charger. Is this fact or fake news, if it is fact it is not talk about when dealing with digital camera, in fact more like not writing about.


I shoot Nikon DSLRs, and I have usually been able to shoot for a full day, maybe 500 shots, on one battery without going to my spare.

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Jan 10, 2019 21:14:53   #
User ID (a regular here)
 
cameraf4 wrote:

Call me Mr. Cautious but I only use Original Manufacturer
Batteries in my $3000.00 cameras. However, I have noticed
that the EN-EL15 battery I have left from my old Nikon D800
works but does not last as long in my D850 as do the
EN-EL15a batteries.


You are misreading the OP. You speak of cameras with
proprietary battery packs but the OP speaks of general
purpose rechargeables.

TO the OP:

What you read is fact, but obsolete fact. About 15 years
outdated. Modern digital cameras no longer use general
purpose rechargeable batteries, only proprietary packs.

.

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Jan 10, 2019 21:43:24   #
Quinn 4
 
The camera I using is a Samsung Digimax 530. I known it a old camera (2004 I think) but a it was new in the box and It is FREE. It takes two AA batteries. I use it today to take 5 pictures I may go week or a month before I would use it agint. I do not keep batteries in the camera when I not use it. Let cut out the high tech talk, not all of us have a PhD from MIT. Low tech talk, thank you.

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Jan 11, 2019 06:10:29   #
sb (a regular here)
 
This is common sense. Anything that relies on batteries will run down batteries with use - the more use, the faster the batteries are worn down. This sounds like the material was written in the early days of digital cameras, when some of them used regular AA batteries. I had a few of those cameras that did burn through batteries quickly. Most of today's digital cameras can produce many hundreds of images with a single battery charge - but that depends on how you use your camera. If you keep the LCD screen on for long periods of time your battery will not last as long. I imagine every serious photographer keeps at the very least one extra spare battery charged up and ready to use.

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Jan 11, 2019 06:29:02   #
Jimmy T
 
Great response sb, however, I would add the GPS & WiFi functions to your list of battery drainers. JimmyT Sends.
sb wrote:
This is common sense. Anything that relies on batteries will run down batteries with use - the more use, the faster the batteries are worn down. This sounds like the material was written in the early days of digital cameras, when some of them used regular AA batteries. I had a few of those cameras that did burn through batteries quickly. Most of today's digital cameras can produce many hundreds of images with a single battery charge - but that depends on how you use your camera. If you keep the LCD screen on for long periods of time your battery will not last as long. I imagine every serious photographer keeps at the very least one extra spare battery charged up and ready to use.
This is common sense. Anything that relies on batt... (show quote)



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Jan 11, 2019 06:58:55   #
Bipod
 
Quinn 4 wrote:
Founded this web site "Our Essential Guide to Batteries" The web site point out any kind of digital camera will run down one batteries in short time. The best one can do is use nickel-metal hydridge battery which can be recharger. Use a smart chargers to recharger the battery. I found at Walmark web site a Universal Battery Charger. Is this fact or fake news, if it is fact it is not talk about when dealing with digital camera, in fact more like not writing about.

Don't let the hostile posts put you off.

An EVF makes enough light to read a newspaper by. That energy has to come from somewhere.

An OVF, on the other hand, draws 0 mA (unless it has a tiny LED display, which draws a tiny
amount of power).

Battery life is a weak point of digital cameras. Batteries in film camers (even those with motorized
film advance) lasted much longer.

The fast processors used in digital cameras draw a lot of power. Now they've added an EVF
that draws a lot of power. And both also make heat. There's no cooling fan in a digital
camera, and no convective cooling.

If EVFs made photographs better, it might be worth it. But they don't Their function is to make
the camera chaper to assemble. But don't expect the savings to passed on the buyer: mirroless
cameras are being prices as high as DSLRs.

Rechargable lithium batteries have been catching fire in handheld devices and even in commerical
aircraft, but no safer replacement is yet available. Despite a huge amount of research, progress
in better batteries has been slow.

Each type of battery produes a different open-circuit voltage. NiMH are slightly lower voltage than
rechargable lithium, so check to make sure the camera says it can use them.

Each type also requires a different charging cycle/algorithm. This can include one or more of:
* timer
* constant voltage
* constant current
* sensing battery temperture

Uusally the simplest way to charge a battery is also the slowest. If quick charging isn't done
exactly right, it can reduce the life of the battery.

You are probably better off with a universal charger than a dedicated one. All universal charges
are microprocessor based, so they can use elaborate charge cycles. However, some try to detect
the battery type, which is not reliable.

Proprietary batteries are a complete ripoff. No camera manufacturer makes batteries (it's a very
specialized industry). At best, some jobber makes them to the company's specs. At worst, the
camera company just buys whatever it cheapest FOB China and put its own label on them.

The market for standard batteries (e.g., AA) is much more competitive, which keeps prices
lower. And battery manufactuers such as Duracell (owned by Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway)
and Everready invest in battery R&D.

Any equipment manufacturer that will sell you a proprietary battery has no scruples. It's a racket.

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Jan 11, 2019 07:37:05   #
itsnoelb
 
Quinn 4 wrote:
Founded this web site "Our Essential Guide to Batteries" The web site point out any kind of digital camera will run down one batteries in short time. The best one can do is use nickel-metal hydridge battery which can be recharger. Use a smart chargers to recharger the battery. I found at Walmark web site a Universal Battery Charger. Is this fact or fake news, if it is fact it is not talk about when dealing with digital camera, in fact more like not writing about.

I did not notice anyone mention auto shutoff. Mine is set at 1 minute unless circumstance calls for a change.

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Jan 11, 2019 08:20:03   #
aphelps
 
Quinn 4 wrote:
Founded this web site "Our Essential Guide to Batteries" The web site point out any kind of digital camera will run down one batteries in short time. The best one can do is use nickel-metal hydridge battery which can be recharger. Use a smart chargers to recharger the battery. I found at Walmark web site a Universal Battery Charger. Is this fact or fake news, if it is fact it is not talk about when dealing with digital camera, in fact more like not writing about.


Most digital cameras use lithium ion batteries. Different animal altogether.

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Jan 11, 2019 08:43:20   #
TomV
 
Bipod wrote:
Don't let the hostile posts put you off.

An EVF makes enough light to read a newspaper by. That energy has to come from somewhere.

An OVF, on the other hand, draws 0 mA (unless it has a tiny LED display, which draws a tiny
amount of power).

Battery life is a weak point of digital cameras. Batteries in film camers (even those with motorized
film advance) lasted much longer.

The fast processors used in digital cameras draw a lot of power. Now they've added an EVF
that draws a lot of power. And both also make heat. There's no cooling fan in a digital
camera, and no convective cooling.

If EVFs made photographs better, it might be worth it. But they don't Their function is to make
the camera chaper to assemble. But don't expect the savings to passed on the buyer: mirroless
cameras are being prices as high as DSLRs.

Rechargable lithium batteries have been catching fire in handheld devices and even in commerical
aircraft, but no safer replacement is yet available. Despite a huge amount of research, progress
in better batteries has been slow.

Each type of battery produes a different open-circuit voltage. NiMH are slightly lower voltage than
rechargable lithium, so check to make sure the camera says it can use them.

Each type also requires a different charging cycle/algorithm. This can include one or more of:
* timer
* constant voltage
* constant current
* sensing battery temperture

Uusally the simplest way to charge a battery is also the slowest. If quick charging isn't done
exactly right, it can reduce the life of the battery.

You are probably better off with a universal charger than a dedicated one. All universal charges
are microprocessor based, so they can use elaborate charge cycles. However, some try to detect
the battery type, which is not reliable.

Proprietary batteries are a complete ripoff. No camera manufacturer makes batteries (it's a very
specialized industry). At best, some jobber makes them to the company's specs. At worst, the
camera company just buys whatever it cheapest FOB China and put its own label on them.

The market for standard batteries (e.g., AA) is much more competitive, which keeps prices
lower. And battery manufactuers such as Duracell (owned by Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway)
and Everready invest in battery R&D.

Any equipment manufacturer that will sell you a proprietary battery has no scruples. It's a racket.
Don't let the hostile posts put you off. br br An... (show quote)


There are so many inaccuracies/exaggerations in your rant that it is difficult to filter out the facts.

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Jan 11, 2019 08:53:49   #
charles tabb
 
Quinn 4 wrote:
The camera I using is a Samsung Digimax 530. I known it a old camera (2004 I think) but a it was new in the box and It is FREE. It takes two AA batteries. I use it today to take 5 pictures I may go week or a month before I would use it agint. I do not keep batteries in the camera when I not use it. Let cut out the high tech talk, not all of us have a PhD from MIT. Low tech talk, thank you.



It was my impression that if you take the Batt. s out of the camera for very long periods of time, the camera's Clock & Date will have to be reset.

True or false?

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