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How to shoot on a boat - Use VR? - Use Tripod - Use Both?
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Nov 8, 2018 13:27:26   #
bigguytf
 
I agree with handheld and higher shutter speed

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Nov 8, 2018 13:45:22   #
JCam
 
rvenn wrote:
Should I use a Tripod on a flat-decked pontoon boat. Should I use VR with the Tripod or without the Tripod?


Rvwnn, I've been photographing from boats, sail & power, using both our boats and Commercial Cruise vessels as a platforms for races and cruises from "Down East" Maine to the Albemarle" Sound in North Carolina.

First, Hand hold your camera! Never use a tripod, mono-pod, or support the camera on the boat itself; all of those situations will not only transfer the vibrations to the camera but increase them. I've never found VR to help so I leave it off, and pontoon boats are no different than anything else that floats and because of their very shallow draft and light weight may be worse.

Depending upon the conditions, both lighting and sea, and what you are shooting (I'm assuming other boats, not things on shore), I'd recommend Auto Spot Focus, and a fixed shutter speed. Let the camera handle the f/stop; for shutter speed, and to preclude the problem of subject and your boat movement whatever shutter speed you would think to normally use in the situation, double it. My rule for "on the water' is a minimum of about 1/800+ (flat water) and I have used 1/2-3000. You will probably have to increase the ISO to enable these speeds or set it too for Auto. Check your shots frequently and adjust the settings if needed; as you get more experience/confidence the "checking" will become less necessary but continue to do it just in case you have inadvertently changed something or the light has changed.

Good luck and post some of your shots here on UHH.

Jim

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Nov 8, 2018 14:04:16   #
rvenn
 
Thanks Jim

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Nov 8, 2018 14:43:55   #
Daryl New
 
Hand held would be my initial reaction and high speed....

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Nov 8, 2018 14:51:44   #
rvenn
 
Thanks Daryl

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Nov 8, 2018 15:29:57   #
rusty66
 
VR on. ISO whatever necessary to get a shutter speed of at least 1/1000. You haven't said what the subject will be. If it is something that moves constantly or rapidly then increase shutter speed even more. Give yourself enough depth of field to ensure that a moving subject shot from a moving platform is within the focus envelope at the moment that the shutter fires. Experiment with short bursts if there are only limited opportunities to capture the image.

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Nov 8, 2018 16:11:49   #
PhotosRfun
 
Check out the Hand-Held-Helper at www.coolcameragadgets.store works great

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Nov 8, 2018 16:32:52   #
rvenn
 
Thanks to everyone

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Nov 8, 2018 22:22:04   #
Ephstarp
 
Hand held and shoot short bursts. This should give you the best chance of catching a good shot.

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Nov 9, 2018 01:05:03   #
Toolking
 
CamB wrote:
Unless, of course, you are shooting Orcas, and you have to keep moving just to keep up with them.
...Cam


Which you had best not do!

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Nov 9, 2018 08:44:00   #
Goldyrock
 
JohnSwanda wrote:
I can't see how a tripod would be effective since the whole boat is moving. The VR might help with hand holding, but I would go with a high enough shutter speed to stop all motion.


I just did a 3 hour cruise on the Chesapeake. I used Steady Shot on my Sony a77. Used a monopod with legs and a ball head. What I did was to use a piece of wet suit material between the head and the monopod and another between the head and the camera.

I was pleasantly surprised by the results. The boat moved slowly at the lighthouses. Shot at high shutter speed. I plan on going back next summer when it is not as windy.

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Nov 9, 2018 11:22:53   #
rvenn
 
Wet suit fabric sounds smart. I am also going to try that "Hand Held Helper" sling that PhotosRFun recommended. I have certainly received a lot of good info from this one inquiry. Thanks to everyone.

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Nov 9, 2018 15:20:21   #
Cibafan
 
I just use a fast shutter speed and shoot free hand.

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Nov 10, 2018 01:09:52   #
bpulv (a regular here)
 
rvenn wrote:
Wet suit fabric sounds smart. I am also going to try that "Hand Held Helper" sling that PhotosRFun recommended. I have certainly received a lot of good info from this one inquiry. Thanks to everyone.


Wetsuits are made of foam Neoprene that can be bought cheaply at many hardware stores without the backing, which has no contributory value for what you are proposing. The original wetsuits made over 50-years ago were made out of 1/8", 3/16" or 1/4" thick foam Neoprene that had no backing. Later, a nylon backing was added to the Neoprene so you would not need to coat your body in talcum powder or soap so that the wetsuit could easily slide on your body when suiting up. I haven't SCUBA dived since 1967, and have not kept up with the technology since then. But, plane unadulterated Neoprene will work well as a shock absorber between your camera and body.

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