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My thought for the day regarding high megapixel cameras
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Aug 10, 2018 07:39:16   #
jerryc41 Loc: Catskill Mts of NY
 
Fotoartist wrote:
My thought for the day regarding high megapixel cameras is that you can shoot everything horizontal which is easier than shooting vertically, and not worry too much about cropping. Shooting everything horizontal is an advantage to me in quick shooting and flash shooting situations.


So true.

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Aug 10, 2018 08:19:32   #
rplain1 Loc: Dayton, Oh.
 
Fotoartist wrote:
My thought for the day regarding high megapixel cameras is that you can shoot everything horizontal which is easier than shooting vertically, and not worry too much about cropping. Shooting everything horizontal is an advantage to me in quick shooting and flash shooting situations.
Just one example - I have a nice photo I took of tall ships passing through a drawbridge. Don't think horizontal would have worked so well unless I didn't care about the masts being there.

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Aug 10, 2018 08:36:31   #
Country Boy Loc: Beckley, WV
 
I have a program that is very inexpensive called "jpegmini" that will reduce the size of jpeg photos and they say it uses a compression process. It does batch processing and is so simple to use. It will almost cut the size of my photos in half and I have played with them by zooming in on the original and the compressed photo and the detail is not reduced to my eye. I think it is a great program.

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Aug 10, 2018 08:46:19   #
Low Budget Dave
 
I have found that hundreds of my photos are cropped square regardless of how they started out. For portraits, all I wanted was the head and shoulders, and the background is just for framing anyway. For pictures on the web, they are usually going to end up square on Facebook, so I just start off that way.

The only time I use landscape is when shooting landscapes, and I hardly ever shoot landscapes. If I want a picture of a nice sunset over the mountains, I just look up the cheapest one on the web (usually free) and use that as my screen-saver.

My memory is bad enough that after a while, I will remember being there...

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Aug 10, 2018 08:52:54   #
gwilliams6
 
rgrenaderphoto wrote:
I would agree with the exception of Panoramas, which IMHO, require vertical shots to be stitched correctly.


My Sony A7RII (42 megapixels) and A6500 (24 megapixels) stitch horizontal shots into beautiful seamless wide panoramas with no problem (in camera).

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Aug 10, 2018 09:16:44   #
srt101fan
 
The concern re cropping seems to me to be another one those issues where "generalizing" does a disservice to photography learners. Even though I agree with Steve Perry and others that caution against unnecessary cropping, I also think that it can be considered a tool or means for getting images you might otherwise not get.

For some types of photography (landscape, studio, portrait, product) the photographer should be able to get his/her shots without preplanned cropping.

For other scenarios - street, travel, candid - planning for cropping may be perfectly reasonable. I've taken travel pictures of areas with a large number of people (e.g. town squares) where I later found interesting pictures within a picture. Also, I find cropping for architectural details better than not taking the picture because I didn't have a long enough lens.

So, IMHO, cropping ain't always bad; it all depends...

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Aug 10, 2018 09:53:46   #
gwilliams6
 
I own both higher megapixel cameras A7RII, A7RIII (both 42 megapixels, fullframe); and A7III (24 megapixels, fullframe) and A6500 (24 megapixels, APS-C). I dont purposely shoot a looser composition with my 42 megapixel cameras, just to crop it later. I always try to compose correctly before I shoot. But sometimes I have to shoot from either a restricted vantage spot or with less focal length than I wanted. In those cases the ability to make larger crops in post are a distinct advantage of a higher megapixel image.


But in reality the best of the present digital cameras allow great image quality from everything from micro 4/3, APS-C and fullframe cameras alike, for most subjects and in good light. In low light, and for higher ISO performance, the larger individual pixels of the higher megapixel sensors do result in generally better image quality and less apparent image noise. For cameras that do pixel-stacking shots, and for any stitching/panorama work, the more megapixels usually is better IMHO.

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Aug 10, 2018 10:10:08   #
dennis2146 Loc: So California/Colorado/Idaho
 
I have never noticed any problem with turning my wrists to shoot in the vertical mode but apparently it does matter to some.

Good shooting to you,

Dennis

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Aug 10, 2018 10:26:43   #
Steve Perry Loc: Sylvania, Ohio
 
Fotoartist wrote:
Here's a quick example of just get the shot. Crop it vertically later.


Cute shot :) And I'd probably crop it square - just a thought. (The funny thing is, if you crop it square, it doesn't really matter which orientation the camera was)

At any rate, it seems like you believe that shooting vertical and capturing a fast moving / fluid situation are mutually exclusive - they are not. Back in the film days, action was captured in a vertical format by sports photographers with far less sophisticated gear than what we have today. It just takes practice. I find no difference in the overall speed I can capture an image if the camera is vertical or horizontal - you just need to practice and get comfortable in vertical. You'll find it every bit as quick as horizontal and if it allows you to fill more of the frame with your subject, you take better advantage of the sensor performance as well.

Again, just to be clear, I'm not against all cropping, just against cropping "because you can" instead of getting closer, turning the camera, etc. Cropping should be a tool of last resort, not a first choice.

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Aug 10, 2018 10:30:04   #
rmalarz Loc: Tempe, Arizona
 
I have no issue with turning the camera 90 degrees. I've never thought, nor will I, that cropping a vertical photograph from one where the camera was held horizontally is a good way to go.
--Bob
Fotoartist wrote:
My thought for the day regarding high megapixel cameras is that you can shoot everything horizontal which is easier than shooting vertically, and not worry too much about cropping. Shooting everything horizontal is an advantage to me in quick shooting and flash shooting situations.

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Aug 10, 2018 10:48:28   #
BobHartung Loc: Bettendorf, IA
 
Fotoartist wrote:
My thought for the day regarding high megapixel cameras is that you can shoot everything horizontal which is easier than shooting vertically, and not worry too much about cropping. Shooting everything horizontal is an advantage to me in quick shooting and flash shooting situations.


The real advantage with the high megapixel medium format lenses is the presence of larger pixels leading to better photon detection and less noise and the optics associated with the better lenses. Even the iPhone can be printed to 24"x24" to good results so it is just not pixel count that is important.

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Aug 10, 2018 10:48:50   #
Rongnongno Loc: FL, FR
 
Fotoartist wrote:
Here's a quick example of just get the shot. Crop it vertically later.

Well, if you crop vertically you are missing the best crop here: Square.

How much does it cost to raise the background height?

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Aug 10, 2018 10:54:51   #
Rongnongno Loc: FL, FR
 
Fotoartist wrote:
.../... Shooting everything horizontal is an advantage to me in quick shooting and flash shooting situations.

Flash should not be an issue unless one uses the on camera flash or a flash on top of the camera.
Quick shooting... Use burst mode with a good buffer (the D5, D500 and D850 have an incredible buffer).

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Aug 10, 2018 11:07:08   #
jeep_daddy Loc: Prescott AZ
 
Fotoartist wrote:
My thought for the day regarding high megapixel cameras is that you can shoot everything horizontal which is easier than shooting vertically, and not worry too much about cropping. Shooting everything horizontal is an advantage to me in quick shooting and flash shooting situations.


If that works for you, then that's fine. You have my permission to carry on. Just kidding.

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Aug 10, 2018 11:27:43   #
rook2c4 Loc: Philadelphia, PA USA
 
Leitz wrote:
Only a fool would buy all those megapixels to deliberately throw away.


That's typically how a technology-obsessed photographer looks at it.

However, an artistic-minded photographer looks at the situation a bit differently:
You are buying the freedom to throw away megapixels. You are buying yourself greater flexibility.

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