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After scanning old photos, archive in a box or trash?
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Jul 11, 2018 20:26:43   #
rpavich (a regular here)
 
Stardust wrote:
Are you sure since that thought was just vapor in your mind?


Yes

Quote:
Besides, if you have the scan you can always re-create the paper picture if needed or desired.


Not a real print, just an inkjet...yuk.

I dont want to hijack the thread by arguing, anyone can do what they like, i like real wet prints, others like scans, thats fine.

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Jul 11, 2018 20:29:17   #
Uuglypher (a regular here)
 
Longshadow wrote:
What do most people do with old photos that they scanned? Archive them in a box or throw them out?
I have many that are over 50 years old that I will be scanning. Scans are backed up in three places and in the cloud.
My primary reason for scanning them is to have a digital copy and also make them available to family.
It appears that they all will fit in one copier paper box.

Thoughts and opinions?


I have digitized copies or negs of most of the originals I lost in a flood in 2000...but I still mourn their loss. If the accumulated originals since then will be thrown out, it’s my heirs that do the throwing.
I think Pavich and I are of a mind.

Dave

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Jul 11, 2018 22:24:48   #
lbuhle
 
wayne barnett wrote:
Only one addition. If you keep the photos, in addition to a connection to a file, put the name of the person, event, place. I have many with out any ID on the back so become worthless as no one knows who people in Pics are.


Before my parents passed...I created the digital equivalent of contact prints from the old family photos. While their short-term memory was shot, they could name the dog in the picture, the lady standing next to my grandmother (was a neighbor, so don't kill yourself trying to figure out where they stood in the family). I agree...where was the picture taken, when, who are these people...all vital info. I still have WWI pictures to scan...for those marked with "where", a quick glance at google sometimes brings me to the same house where the picture was taken in 1918!

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Jul 11, 2018 23:00:45   #
JD750 (a regular here)
 
Longshadow wrote:
Thanks everyone, you all confirmed my initial thoughts about keeping them.
(I have a hard time getting rid of books also.)


Longshadow, no guilt. Keep things if you want. You have that right. And you should use it. Life is shorty. Enjoy it.

Let your ancestors deal with the emotions of throwing stuff away if they wish to. ;)

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Jul 12, 2018 01:58:53   #
Stardust
 
rpavich wrote:
Not a real print, just an inkjet...yuk.
Not to hijack the thread either but it is germane to the question the OP asked and I stated, once you have the scan (digital) file you can improve it - fix dust particles, scratches, etc. if you wish. Then if you ever wish to have any particular photo, they can be printed any time, either by "yuk" inkjet, or color laser or at your local finisher, as real as any old print but better per PP and better equipment today.

Plus I don't have to store 10,000 old photos and watch them continue to deteriorate. Why once I have a good scan, they all get burned.

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Jul 12, 2018 02:57:38   #
rook2c4 (a regular here)
 
If you wish your images to last for several generations, save the prints! Unless periodically backed up, the digital files may likely not last more than 20, maybe 30 years before they become unreadable.

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Jul 12, 2018 05:15:05   #
joer (a regular here)
 
Longshadow wrote:
What do most people do with old photos that they scanned? Archive them in a box or throw them out?
I have many that are over 50 years old that I will be scanning. Scans are backed up in three places and in the cloud.
My primary reason for scanning them is to have a digital copy and also make them available to family.
It appears that they all will fit in one copier paper box.

Thoughts and opinions?


They are your photos, do what you think best. I'm not one to hang on to things, but that's me. There is more than enough clutter in my life.

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Jul 12, 2018 05:55:44   #
John N (a regular here)
 
When you finally leave us who is going to enjoy the originals. There'll be so many of them that keeping them as an investment (or a history lesson) for future generations is a waste of time.

I've a fellow club member, just touched 74, going through this process right now. He knows his kids won't touch them unless they can see them on a P.C. or T.V.

And if U.S. housing is going the same way as U.K. housing (getting smaller) they'll have no where to keep them anyway. So what I'm basically saying is that if you're happy with your back up safety net - get rid of them, because I doubt the next generation will want them.

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Jul 12, 2018 06:13:05   #
ncribble
 
We held a family reunion last year and my sister answered you question perfectly. She placed hundreds of old photographs on her pool table to give to anyone who wanted them. The younger generations spent hours looking and picking those treasures. They are the ones, by selection, who know have the shoe boxes of old photographs. I can't wait until our next reunion to offer my scanned photos. Norm

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Jul 12, 2018 06:31:46   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
rpavich wrote:
Not a real print, just an inkjet...yuk.

I dont want to hijack the thread by arguing, anyone can do what they like, i like real wet prints, others like scans, thats fine.


Not hijacking, a related opinion.
(I like wet prints better also.)

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Jul 12, 2018 06:32:14   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
ncribble wrote:
We held a family reunion last year and my sister answered you question perfectly. She placed hundreds of old photographs on her pool table to give to anyone who wanted them. The younger generations spent hours looking and picking those treasures. They are the ones, by selection, who know have the shoe boxes of old photographs. I can't wait until our next reunion to offer my scanned photos. Norm



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Jul 12, 2018 06:46:23   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
John N wrote:
When you finally leave us who is going to enjoy the originals. There'll be so many of them that keeping them as an investment (or a history lesson) for future generations is a waste of time.

I've a fellow club member, just touched 74, going through this process right now. He knows his kids won't touch them unless they can see them on a P.C. or T.V.

And if U.S. housing is going the same way as U.K. housing (getting smaller) they'll have no where to keep them anyway. So what I'm basically saying is that if you're happy with your back up safety net - get rid of them, because I doubt the next generation will want them.
When you finally leave us who is going to enjoy th... (show quote)


Probably more of a truism than most people will think or admit to.
Many things change from generation to generation, influenced by technology and society.

I'll let the kids decide.

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Jul 12, 2018 07:12:50   #
LCD
 
Keep them if you have the space in a dry, cool spot. Throw out you old issues of National Geographic and your high school wrestling trophies first, but at some point you may need to weed your collection for space. It is sad if you have to. Its great having everything digitized, but nothing beats the tangibility of holding a physical image in your hand.

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Jul 12, 2018 07:21:22   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
LCD wrote:
Keep them if you have the space in a dry, cool spot. Throw out you old issues of National Geographic and your high school wrestling trophies first, but at some point you may need to weed your collection for space. It is sad if you have to. Its great having everything digitized, but nothing beats the tangibility of holding a physical image in your hand.


Especially OLD images.

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Jul 12, 2018 07:44:24   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
Longshadow wrote:
What do most people do with old photos that they scanned? Archive them in a box or throw them out?
I have many that are over 50 years old that I will be scanning. Scans are backed up in three places and in the cloud.
My primary reason for scanning them is to have a digital copy and also make them available to family.
It appears that they all will fit in one copier paper box.

Thoughts and opinions?


I keep them. Two copies are better than one.

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