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Shooting mode question
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Apr 14, 2018 19:56:10   #
marciamyers
 
New to group and photography...am 67 and purchased an entry level (1st DSLR) Nikon D3400 in December. Having a great time with it, have shot exclusively in manual mode to learn how to use the camera and maneuver the different settings and have learned more than I ever realized I did not know, but still lots to learn. Am wondering when and why you would use shutter priority or aperture priority over manual mode.....I can guess it would speed things up but if that is the case when would you know to use those settings? Thanks for any input you can give.
 
Apr 14, 2018 20:07:55   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
Welcome to the forum.

There are many variables to selecting aperture, shutter, manual, program, etc..
But in a nutshell-
Aperture priority is used when you want more control over depth of field;
Shutter priority when you need to control the speed (fast/slow);
Manual when you want to have the camera tell you what to use and you set it yourself;
Program when you want the camera to select the best option it believes would be correct.

The best is to experiment with each mode.

You should be able to find more info here: http://digital-photography-school.com/
as well as your manual.

Happy shooting.
Apr 14, 2018 20:25:16   #
Robeng
 
marciamyers wrote:
New to group and photography...am 67 and purchased an entry level (1st DSLR) Nikon D3400 in December. Having a great time with it, have shot exclusively in manual mode to learn how to use the camera and maneuver the different settings and have learned more than I ever realized I did not know, but still lots to learn. Am wondering when and why you would use shutter priority or aperture priority over manual mode.....I can guess it would speed things up but if that is the case when would you know to use those settings? Thanks for any input you can give.
New to group and photography...am 67 and purchased... (show quote)


Hi Marciamyers,

Welcome to the Hog, you will find this site has lots & lots of information regarding photography.

You would use shutter priority when you want to create images that show motion or freeze a moving object and don't have time to play around with your settings . For example the guy on the scooter. You would use aperture priority when you want the same depth of field. If I'm photographing landscape and the lighting is all the same I would set my camera to aperture priority and shoot. An example of my Yosemite image.

Rob
Man riding a scooter
Man riding a scooter...
Yosemite Sunrise
Yosemite Sunrise...
Apr 14, 2018 20:41:23   #
sirlensalot
 
Manual mode. It's all you will ever need.
Apr 14, 2018 21:08:05   #
crazydaddio
 
sirlensalot wrote:
Manual mode. It's all you will ever need.




...with a couple very niche'y exceptions.
...backing out of a church will shooting the bride and groom paparazzi style....

Either AutoISO or let the shutter speed "float". The transition from dark to light with the time-senstive subject matter means you dont want to miss it!

Other examples but they are few imho.
Manual is the way to go once you get comfy with being able to " see it and set it" in seconds.
Apr 14, 2018 21:26:01   #
rmalarz (a regular here)
 
Marcia, I use manual mode 99% of the time I photograph. In some cases, I don't have a choice. However, there is always the balance of whether I want depth of field, or action stopped. etc. An example, I was asked to photograph a horse/rider competition. It was held in a local park and the background was not attractive. So, I chose to use Aperture priority in order to limit the sharp focus to the rider/horse competing. This required that I also use a short shutter speed to stop the action. In order to do that, I had to boost the ISO a bit. All that worked well. I hope this provides you a bit of insight as to using A and S modes.

Even in Manual mode, I still have to make decisions regarding the depth of field, things moving, etc. It's pretty much system management.
--Bob
marciamyers wrote:
New to group and photography...am 67 and purchased an entry level (1st DSLR) Nikon D3400 in December. Having a great time with it, have shot exclusively in manual mode to learn how to use the camera and maneuver the different settings and have learned more than I ever realized I did not know, but still lots to learn. Am wondering when and why you would use shutter priority or aperture priority over manual mode.....I can guess it would speed things up but if that is the case when would you know to use those settings? Thanks for any input you can give.
New to group and photography...am 67 and purchased... (show quote)
 
Apr 15, 2018 07:53:09   #
CO (a regular here)
 
I use manual mode for studio photo shoots when using studio strobes. The camera can't do TTL metering with the strobe so I take light meter readings and enter those settings into the camera.

I use aperture priority a lot because I can control the depth of field and get the lens into its sweet spot range where it's the sharpest. This is an image resolution chart for one of my lenses. In manual mode and aperture priority, I can make sure it's in the sweet spot range.
Highest resolution in the f/4 to f/5.6 range
Highest resolution in the f/4 to f/5.6 range...
(Download)
Apr 15, 2018 07:56:41   #
pithydoug
 
marciamyers wrote:
New to group and photography...am 67 and purchased an entry level (1st DSLR) Nikon D3400 in December. Having a great time with it, have shot exclusively in manual mode to learn how to use the camera and maneuver the different settings and have learned more than I ever realized I did not know, but still lots to learn. Am wondering when and why you would use shutter priority or aperture priority over manual mode.....I can guess it would speed things up but if that is the case when would you know to use those settings? Thanks for any input you can give.
New to group and photography...am 67 and purchased... (show quote)


Manual is fine if you always have the time to do the settings. I use aperture priority for 99% of my landscape shots, especially sunrises and sunsets when the light is rapidly changing. Can I recompute the settings for each picture, sure, but why, the camera does a darn near perfect shutter setting. Tripod, set ap, Iso 100, cable release(or 2 sec timer), enjoy the rise or set and simply click when you want. The only time I need to touch the camera is if i want to change the where I'm aiming. It's not laziness but I would end up using the same shutter speed if I played manual. I'd rather not spend my time playing with the settings but enjoying the view.

I use shutter priority when shooting sporting events. I guarantee if you try to shoot in manual mode, you will miss THE shot while playing with the dials. During action photography you are constantly scanning for the basketball stuff, hockey goal, running battle for the finish, the babies first step, etc, etc.

There is a reason all that technology is built in.

In middle of the day where light is constant or in a studio I'll flip to manual as I'm looking for single shot. Bottom line, when you have the time, fine, when time is factor try one of the bias modes.

And depending on one's cameras AUTO ISO an be a savimg grace.
Apr 15, 2018 08:12:02   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
pithydoug wrote:
Manual is fine if you always have the time to do the settings. I use aperture priority for 99% of my landscape shots, especially sunrises and sunsets when the light is rapidly changing. Can I recompute the settings for each picture, sure, but why, the camera does a darn near perfect shutter setting. Tripod, set ap, Iso 100, cable release(or 2 sec timer), enjoy the rise or set and simply click when you want. The only time I need to touch the camera is if i want to change the where I'm aiming. It's not laziness but I would end up using the same shutter speed if I played manual. I'd rather not spend my time playing with the settings but enjoying the view.

I use shutter priority when shooting sporting events. I guarantee if you try to shoot in manual mode, you will miss THE shot while playing with the dials. During action photography you are constantly scanning for the basketball stuff, hockey goal, running battle for the finish, the babies first step, etc, etc.

There is a reason all that technology is built in.

In middle of the day where light is constant or in a studio I'll flip to manual as I'm looking for single shot. Bottom line, when you have the time, fine, when time is factor try one of the bias modes.

And depending on one's cameras AUTO ISO an be a savimg grace.
Manual is fine if you always have the time to do t... (show quote)


Apr 15, 2018 08:38:24   #
windshoppe
 
Why would anyone purchase an expensive camera with all of that marvelous technology and then shoot exclusively in manual? Some of the comments above clarify the use of aperture and shutter priority. I'd recommend learning to work in all of the various modes. The shooting subject and circumstances will then
determine which to use.
Apr 15, 2018 08:40:19   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
windshoppe wrote:
Why would anyone purchase an expensive camera with all of that marvelous technology and then shoot exclusively in manual? Some of the comments above clarify the use of aperture and shutter priority. I'd recommend learning to work in all of the various modes. The shooting subject and circumstances will then
determine which to use.


 
Apr 15, 2018 08:44:53   #
OneShotOne18
 
Hey, I am new here on this forum as well a newbie photo taker. All this ISO's, aperture, shutter speed, priority modes and manual and how and why and when to use then is downright OVERWHELMING. I want to thank each of you who answered this post. This clarifies the haze on my photographic mind. THX!!!
Apr 15, 2018 08:56:26   #
anotherview (a regular here)
 
Conditions will guide you. For example, in bright sunlight, you could use aperture priority mode to achieve the depth of field you want. The lighting would most likely bring up the shutter speed and lower the ISO (assuming ISO set to auto).

As another example, in lower lighting, you could boost the ISO setting with the aperture setting dialed in manually producing a shutter speed fast enough to maintain sharpness if shooting handheld. You'd have to do a test shot or two to determine the necessary ISO setting for a fast-enough shutter speed.

You have reached a point on the learning curve where you recognize the necessity of understanding the exposure triangle. Keep at it.
marciamyers wrote:
New to group and photography...am 67 and purchased an entry level (1st DSLR) Nikon D3400 in December. Having a great time with it, have shot exclusively in manual mode to learn how to use the camera and maneuver the different settings and have learned more than I ever realized I did not know, but still lots to learn. Am wondering when and why you would use shutter priority or aperture priority over manual mode.....I can guess it would speed things up but if that is the case when would you know to use those settings? Thanks for any input you can give.
New to group and photography...am 67 and purchased... (show quote)
Apr 15, 2018 08:57:57   #
Longshadow (a regular here)
 
OneShotOne18 wrote:
Hey, I am new here on this forum as well a newbie photo taker. All this ISO's, aperture, shutter speed, priority modes and manual and how and why and when to use then is downright OVERWHELMING. I want to thank each of you who answered this post. This clarifies the haze on my photographic mind. THX!!!


Yea, there's a lot of stuff to digest. The best thing to do after reading various tutorials is to experiment with your camera. This will help you understand the processes and affects of the various settings.
Have fun!
Apr 15, 2018 09:01:35   #
marciamyers
 
Many thanks to all who have responded with such great info. I have no friends doing photography so asking a direct question here and getting so much help from experienced folks is very beneficial and greatly appreciated!
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