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How long does film last?
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Mar 12, 2018 20:19:44   #
DeeAndre
 
My brother-in-law passed away this past Aug. He had a lot of old film cameras and lots of film. I imagine the film would be at least 2 yrs. old if not older. Would it still be good? I shoot digital now and have not used film for years; so should I just toss it? Hid daughter asked me about it and I said I would ask the UHH family for their opinion. Thanks for your help.
 
Mar 12, 2018 20:24:32   #
Bill_de (a regular here)
 
If frozen it should last a long time. Otherwise check the packaging for an expiration date.

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Mar 12, 2018 20:27:29   #
Acountry330
 
The film should be OK. Just don't use it on anything important. Getting it processed may be a small problem.
Mar 12, 2018 20:29:28   #
DeeAndre
 
Thanks for your quick reply. It was found in a dresser drawer in the plastic containers. Did not find a date stamped on it.
Mar 12, 2018 20:36:57   #
DeeAndre
 
Acountry330 wrote:
The film should be OK. Just don't use it on anything important. Getting it processed may be a small problem.


Thanks for your answer.Do any large retail stores (Walmart, etc.) still process film?
Mar 12, 2018 20:43:45   #
jmccl
 
www.thedarkroom.com is one of the best places to develop film.
 
Mar 12, 2018 20:47:37   #
OddJobber
 
Gone With the Wind lasted just two minutes short of 4 hours.
The expiration date would have been stamped on the cardboard box the roll(s) came in.
Mar 12, 2018 20:53:30   #
DeeAndre
 
jmccl wrote:
www.thedarkroom.com is one of the best places to develop film.


Great info, thanks!
Mar 12, 2018 20:56:25   #
DeeAndre
 
OddJobber wrote:
Gone With the Wind lasted just two minutes short of 4 hours.
The expiration date would have been stamped on the cardboard box the roll(s) came in.


Shame he didn't save those boxes. Any idea what this film would be worth, if anything?
Mar 12, 2018 21:59:00   #
Horseart
 
I still have several film cameras and a few years ago, I used about 18 rolls that had been in a refrigerator for 6-8 years and it was still good. That film was bought for 10 cents a roll AFTER the expiration date.
Mar 12, 2018 21:59:36   #
OddJobber
 
Without expiration date and unknown storage conditions, I wouldn't want them. :-(
 
Mar 12, 2018 22:00:27   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
Size? Brand name? Film name?
Mar 12, 2018 23:09:50   #
rook2c4
 
Acountry330 wrote:
The film should be OK. Just don't use it on anything important. Getting it processed may be a small problem.


Unless one is dealing with some sort of ultra-sensitive specialty film, two years is really not that old for film. I often use film that is five years or older, and I can't tell any difference of results when compared to fresh film. And why should getting it processed be a problem? Although not on every street corner as it once used to be, there are still many processing labs around.
Mar 12, 2018 23:20:26   #
burkphoto (a regular here)
 
rook2c4 wrote:
Unless one is dealing with some sort of ultra-sensitive specialty film, two years is really not that old for film. I often use film that is five years or older, and I can't tell any difference of results when compared to fresh film. And why should getting it processed be a problem? Although not on every street corner as it once used to be, there are still many processing labs around.


Heat is the enemy. If kept cool, it can last a long time.

As for processing it, only Kodachrome is impossible to get processed properly (although some labs will soup it to black-and-white). All E6, C41, and black-and-white films can be processed.
Mar 12, 2018 23:36:04   #
Joe Blow
 
If they are still in the plastic containers, I would check to see if they have been exposed. If there is the tail of film hanging out of the cartridge then it has not been exposed. If there is no tail then the film has been exposed and rewound back into the cartridge. Exposed film has a shorter shelf life.
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