Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Home | Photography Digest | Active Topics | Newest Pictures | Search | Login | Register | Help
Links and Resources
Photographic vision
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Oct 17, 2017 10:10:04   #
gvarner (a regular here)
 
While thinking about photographic vision this morning, I Googled up this article. It discusses making a photo versus taking a photo and helped clarify my thinking on this subject. It was one of many articles on this topic. Vision has to do with the emotion you want to invoke in the viewer and/or the story tied to that emotion.

http://www.wikiphotographer.net/how-developing-your-photographic-vision-will-make-you-a-better-photographer/

| Reply
Oct 17, 2017 10:41:28   #
rjaywallace (a regular here)
 
Interesting thoughts, but the author is not identified.

| Reply
Oct 17, 2017 10:56:23   #
via the lens (a regular here)
 
gvarner wrote:
While thinking about photographic vision this morning, I Googled up this article. It discusses making a photo versus taking a photo and helped clarify my thinking on this subject. It was one of many articles on this topic. Vision has to do with the emotion you want to invoke in the viewer and/or the story tied to that emotion.

http://www.wikiphotographer.net/how-developing-your-photographic-vision-will-make-you-a-better-photographer/


Putting together artistic vision and technical skill is what gets a photographer a good (good being a relative term) photograph. Learning to see the shot in your mind prior to actually taking it will help you to reach your artistic goals. If you practice this, study up on technique and artistic skills, then eventually you see the shot prior to taking it and can do that in a very quick time frame. I've heard many people complain about learning composition and say that it impedes artistic photography but I don't believe that and don't practice that. I recently saw an exhibit of photographs, taken in the 30s, 40s, and 50s, of Werner Bischoff who worked for Magnum. There was a whole room of proofs and in every shot in the proofs I saw composition, composition, composition! Bischoff was an excellent photographer and produced some very nice work of varied subjects over time; he started out as an artist, not a photographer. Technique (artistic and mechanical) helps to solidify vision and together the duo will end up getting you good shots and in some cases, great shots. When I shoot these days I see the end result prior to taking the photo; some photos live up to this and other don't but I keep on trying.

| Reply
Oct 17, 2017 12:45:27   #
rook2c4 (a regular here)
 
rjaywallace wrote:
Interesting thoughts, but the author is not identified.


Presumably the photographer who runs the website:
http://www.wikiphotographer.net/about/
He doesn't seem to give his full name anywhere, but I don't think that's really important... it's the article's content that matters most.

| Reply
Oct 17, 2017 12:55:13   #
gvarner (a regular here)
 
via the lens wrote:
Putting together artistic vision and technical skill is what gets a photographer a good (good being a relative term) photograph. Learning to see the shot in your mind prior to actually taking it will help you to reach your artistic goals. If you practice this, study up on technique and artistic skills, then eventually you see the shot prior to taking it and can do that in a very quick time frame. I've heard many people complain about learning composition and say that it impedes artistic photography but I don't believe that and don't practice that. I recently saw an exhibit of photographs, taken in the 30s, 40s, and 50s, of Werner Bischoff who worked for Magnum. There was a whole room of proofs and in every shot in the proofs I saw composition, composition, composition! Bischoff was an excellent photographer and produced some very nice work of varied subjects over time; he started out as an artist, not a photographer. Technique (artistic and mechanical) helps to solidify vision and together the duo will end up getting you good shots and in some cases, great shots. When I shoot these days I see the end result prior to taking the photo; some photos live up to this and other don't but I keep on trying.
Putting together artistic vision and technical ski... (show quote)


I think my downfall is the artistic goal part. That's a pretty rudimentary part of my brain. And thanks for your words, they help me focus on my shortcomings. Hopefully by identifying the problem I can work on a solution.

| Reply
Oct 17, 2017 13:10:53   #
Peterff
 
via the lens wrote:
Putting together artistic vision and technical skill is what gets a photographer a good (good being a relative term) photograph. Learning to see the shot in your mind prior to actually taking it will help you to reach your artistic goals. If you practice this, study up on technique and artistic skills, then eventually you see the shot prior to taking it and can do that in a very quick time frame. I've heard many people complain about learning composition and say that it impedes artistic photography but I don't believe that and don't practice that. I recently saw an exhibit of photographs, taken in the 30s, 40s, and 50s, of Werner Bischoff who worked for Magnum. There was a whole room of proofs and in every shot in the proofs I saw composition, composition, composition! Bischoff was an excellent photographer and produced some very nice work of varied subjects over time; he started out as an artist, not a photographer. Technique (artistic and mechanical) helps to solidify vision and together the duo will end up getting you good shots and in some cases, great shots. When I shoot these days I see the end result prior to taking the photo; some photos live up to this and other don't but I keep on trying.
Putting together artistic vision and technical ski... (show quote)


Well said.

| Reply
Oct 18, 2017 11:31:43   #
Kiron Kid
 
“A photograph that mirrors reality, cannot compare to one that reflects the spirit.”

KK

| Reply
Oct 18, 2017 11:34:13   #
Kiron Kid
 
Shoot the scene with your own, unique personal vision. We all see differently. Be true to your vision. That will insure that your images are uniquely your own.

KK

| Reply
Oct 18, 2017 14:27:14   #
Hal81 (a regular here)
 
When I download my photos I most always have to at least crop them. They look ok in the camera but they always seem to need cropping. Other than that some need a little darkening or lightening. Sometimes they even need straightening. Just think how we have it so nice since the film days.

| Reply
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Links and Resources
Home | Latest Digest | Back to Top | All Sections
Contact us | Privacy policy | Terms of use
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2018 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.