Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Nikon D750 locked up
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Page: 1 2 next>>
Nov 7, 2015 06:14:32   #
OnDSnap
 
So I'm shooting a Soccer Game, (officially to boot) and my D750 froze up. Couldn't do a thing, nothing was working (freshly charged bats) yet I could see some info on the top screen. I was using a Nikon 70-200 VRII with a Nikon 2.0 TC. at the time. Which I've used many times prior with no problems. Remedy.... removed the camera battery (not the MD bat) shoved it back in and all was good again. Anyone else have this happen?

Thanks,
Doug

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 06:56:16   #
Apaflo
 
OnDSnap wrote:
So I'm shooting a Soccer Game, (officially to boot) and my D750 froze up. Couldn't do a thing, nothing was working (freshly charged bats) yet I could see some info on the top screen. I was using a Nikon 70-200 VRII with a Nikon 2.0 TC. at the time. Which I've used many times prior with no problems. Remedy.... removed the camera battery (not the MD bat) shoved it back in and all was good again. Anyone else have this happen?

Thanks,
Doug

Yes, but not with a Nikon D750. Just with literally thousands of different kinds of electronic equipment. It is more likely with consumer grade equipment, but it happens with some very very high end stuff too.

It might be caused by a design flaw, but that isn't as likely as you'd think. Another cause is from static electricity, which might be the most likely cause. And another cause might be random gamma radiation.

Any of those can occasionally cause a bit in RAM to be changed, with the result that a program tries to do something it can't, and locks up in the process. Commonly the cure is a "reset", which in many cases simply means doing a power cycle.

Hence one instance doesn't mean much. You may not see a repeat for several years, which would be okay. On the other hand, if this happens 2 or 3 times in the next six months, that is bad bad bad.

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 06:58:12   #
Bill_de (a regular here)
 
I haven't had it happen recently, but it was pretty common with the early Nikon DSLRs. The solution was the same.


---

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 07:03:12   #
Capture48
 
OnDSnap wrote:
So I'm shooting a Soccer Game, (officially to boot) and my D750 froze up. Couldn't do a thing, nothing was working (freshly charged bats) yet I could see some info on the top screen. I was using a Nikon 70-200 VRII with a Nikon 2.0 TC. at the time. Which I've used many times prior with no problems. Remedy.... removed the camera battery (not the MD bat) shoved it back in and all was good again. Anyone else have this happen?

Thanks,
Doug

This is why professional carry a backup camera. Cameras are electronic devices and one day they will just not work, no matter how much you pay for them.

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 08:38:43   #
quixdraw
 
Good luck that it re booted! I've had to remove the battery and count many times over the years with laptops. Good to know it might work on a camera. Thanks!

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 09:04:13   #
Donwitz
 
OnDSnap wrote:
So I'm shooting a Soccer Game, (officially to boot) and my D750 froze up. Couldn't do a thing, nothing was working (freshly charged bats) yet I could see some info on the top screen. I was using a Nikon 70-200 VRII with a Nikon 2.0 TC. at the time. Which I've used many times prior with no problems. Remedy.... removed the camera battery (not the MD bat) shoved it back in and all was good again. Anyone else have this happen?

Thanks,
Doug


I have had this happen to me with my old D80 and D7000. Google "Nikon D750 firmware update". There are links to download version 1.02 of the "C" firmware and instructions on how to check your current version. It says that the update will improve camera operation.Hope that it solves your problem!

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 09:12:50   #
OnDSnap
 
Capture48 wrote:
This is why professional carry a backup camera. Cameras are electronic devices and one day they will just not work, no matter how much you pay for them.


Agree and I do and had a back up, carrying a back up doesn't cure the cause to the other one.

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 09:13:49   #
OnDSnap
 
Donwitz wrote:
I have had this happen to me with my old D80 and D7000. Google "Nikon D750 firmware update". There are links to download version 1.02 of the "C" firmware and instructions on how to check your current version. It says that the update will improve camera operation.Hope that it solves your problem!


Thanks, firmware is up to date, camera is 1 month old.

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 09:23:31   #
OnDSnap
 
Apaflo wrote:
Yes, but not with a Nikon D750. Just with literally thousands of different kinds of electronic equipment. It is more likely with consumer grade equipment, but it happens with some very very high end stuff too.

It might be caused by a design flaw, but that isn't as likely as you'd think. Another cause is from static electricity, which might be the most likely cause. And another cause might be random gamma radiation.

Any of those can occasionally cause a bit in RAM to be changed, with the result that a program tries to do something it can't, and locks up in the process. Commonly the cure is a "reset", which in many cases simply means doing a power cycle.

Hence one instance doesn't mean much. You may not see a repeat for several years, which would be okay. On the other hand, if this happens 2 or 3 times in the next six months, that is bad bad bad.
Yes, but not with a Nikon D750. Just with literal... (show quote)


Yeah and Aliens landed next door while I was warming up in the micro wave. :) Well aware of electronic failures, built enough computers to know whats a killer and what isn't. Resets don't work when there is no response to pressing buttons. Personally, I think it got a cramp trying to save a burst of shots...even with Lexar pro 150mb/s 1000x cards. Well pulling the battery worked so we'll see if it happen again.

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 09:29:44   #
Apaflo
 
OnDSnap wrote:
Yeah and Aliens landed next door while I was warming up in the micro wave. :) Well aware of electronic failures, built enough computers to know whats a killer and what isn't. Resets don't work when there is no response to pressing buttons. Personally, I think it got a cramp trying to save a burst of shots...even with Lexar pro 150mb/s 1000x cards. Well pulling the battery worked so we'll see if it happen again.

A power cycle is the ultimate reset. Resets that use buttons require the CPU to be functional...

| Reply
Nov 7, 2015 11:20:06   #
OnDSnap
 
Apaflo wrote:
A power cycle is the ultimate reset. Resets that use buttons require the CPU to be functional...


:thumbup:

| Reply
Nov 8, 2015 06:04:07   #
DaveHam
 
We had a D800 that this happened on too frequently to be acceptable. Took it to Nikon who cleaned the connectors on both camera and lens; resolved the problem.

Like all electrics there can be a build up on connectors that reduced the signal strength. We now regularly clean connectors on all our kit.

| Reply
Nov 8, 2015 06:33:48   #
OnDSnap
 
DaveHam wrote:
We had a D800 that this happened on too frequently to be acceptable. Took it to Nikon who cleaned the connectors on both camera and lens; resolved the problem.

Like all electrics there can be a build up on connectors that reduced the signal strength. We now regularly clean connectors on all our kit.


Actually that was my first thought, dirty connectors. Pulled the lens and TC (new) and checked the cameras connectors (also new). We'll see, I've shot over 500 shots since the incident with no repeat, hoping it was a one & only...

| Reply
Nov 8, 2015 06:40:21   #
Apaflo
 
DaveHam wrote:
We had a D800 that this happened on too frequently to be acceptable. Took it to Nikon who cleaned the connectors on both camera and lens; resolved the problem.

Like all electrics there can be a build up on connectors that reduced the signal strength. We now regularly clean connectors on all our kit.

That is a relatively good policy.

Isopropyl alcohol applied very minimally with a cotton swab or a soft cloth works very well.

If done on a regular basis, I'd make it as infrequent as possible. Try once a year, maybe. Personally I do it as needed. And that turns out to be once every four or five years. But the local conditions probably affect that greatly too. Living in an industrial city might make it necessary more often, same from being near an ocean or in a dusty place.

The point being don't blindly do what someone else does; work out what is needed for your location with your equipment!

| Reply
Nov 8, 2015 06:43:22   #
Apaflo
 
OnDSnap wrote:
Actually that was my first thought, dirty connectors. Pulled the lens and TC (new) and checked the cameras connectors (also new). We'll see, I've shot over 500 shots since the incident with no repeat, hoping it was a one & only...

Many times just exercising the connections will "clean" the contacts!

| Reply
Page: 1 2 next>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2019 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.