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Facial stabilisation - DIY !
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Aug 18, 2014 22:35:56   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
St3v3M wrote:


Thanks for the link St !

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Aug 18, 2014 22:36:59   #
St3v3M Loc: 35,000 feet
 
imagemeister wrote:
Thanks for the link St !

Always

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Aug 18, 2014 22:42:39   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
Maybe there is something the Japanese and Chinese have not thought of ??

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Aug 18, 2014 22:48:40   #
watchcow Loc: Moore, Oklahoma
 
imagemeister wrote:
This facial stabilisation is particularly effective when used in conjunction with the "bodypod" which is particularly useful for BIF's or other action requiring fast mobility.


I use this bodypod idea when I am at airshows. I use a monopod only long enough to fit the foot in a pocket attached to an old military web belt, and the shoulder support is modern military LBE straps. Since you are shooting almost straight up most of the time it is almost impossible to get support for a big tele lens long enough to get under it.

For your face brace idea, I have a suggestion. If you or someone you know uses a C-PAP pump to sleep with, those face masks come with all kinds of braces and fixtures with form-fitting gel and silicone rubber pads. parts of the forehead brace section of one of the "mini" masks might be a comfy adjustment to your design. since most of them are polycarbonate plastic they are pretty tough, and if you need to make a better spot to attach it to your bracket, use a little steel wool or something to burnish the surface, and then try epoxy putty, like that gas tank patching stuff, and attach to the cpap frame and you can embed t-nuts or later drill a hole and push a wellnut into that.

Since these things get thrown away every 6 months to a year, some of your friends might have a couple laying around they keep for spares, or you might find a connection at a nursing home or medical supply company that could get a few examples to play with.

just an example c-pap mask: http://www.cpap.com/productpage/respironics-comfortfusion-nasal-cpap-mask-with-headgear-fitpack.html

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Aug 18, 2014 23:06:37   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
watchcow wrote:
I use this bodypod idea when I am at airshows. I use a monopod only long enough to fit the foot in a pocket attached to an old military web belt, and the shoulder support is modern military LBE straps. Since you are shooting almost straight up most of the time it is almost impossible to get support for a big tele lens long enough to get under it.

For your face brace idea, I have a suggestion. If you or someone you know uses a C-PAP pump to sleep with, those face masks come with all kinds of braces and fixtures with form-fitting gel and silicone rubber pads. parts of the forehead brace section of one of the "mini" masks might be a comfy adjustment to your design. since most of them are polycarbonate plastic they are pretty tough, and if you need to make a better spot to attach it to your bracket, use a little steel wool or something to burnish the surface, and then try epoxy putty, like that gas tank patching stuff, and attach to the cpap frame and you can embed t-nuts or later drill a hole and push a wellnut into that.

Since these things get thrown away every 6 months to a year, some of your friends might have a couple laying around they keep for spares, or you might find a connection at a nursing home or medical supply company that could get a few examples to play with.

just an example c-pap mask: http://www.cpap.com/productpage/respironics-comfortfusion-nasal-cpap-mask-with-headgear-fitpack.html
I use this bodypod idea when I am at airshows. I u... (show quote)


Yes, I used the same basic idea at my last airshow also - but I was using the very lightweight Canon 70-200 f4 with 1.4X so weight was a non-issue. I will look out for the c-pap stuff - I should have one - but cannot afford the $1000 "sleep study" to be able to get one !

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Aug 18, 2014 23:47:39   #
BHC Loc: Strawberry Valley, JF, USA
 
imagemeister wrote:
Yes, the last photo shows it being used on a monopod ... - I have seen the Manfro shoulder brace......I am not discounting it.

Sorry, I was so intrigued by the brace, I completely missed the monopod in the picture. Do you have it mounted right at the center of gravity of the lens/camera or at a point that is comfortable to hold? And is the location of the monopod critical to stability for you? I have no idea, but am looking at the possibility of mounting rings to an old double rod stock my late brother-in-law took off an old de-milled submachine gun he parted out. It's still hanging on the wall in his garage, and is bored for bolts or machine screws at the receiver end. Thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience.

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Aug 19, 2014 17:49:11   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
My intent was to have it at or very near the center of gravity. I would say it is at least somewhat critical for utmost stability - but everyone will have their own opinion on this - and - rightfully so. There is a quick release from the monopod so it can be better utilized for BIF's if need be.

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Oct 8, 2014 22:52:02   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
imagemeister wrote:
This facial stabilisation is particularly effective when used in conjunction with the "bodypod" which is particularly useful for BIF's or other action requiring fast mobility.


In these last photos I show how I have connected the camera to the tripod collar of the lens. This has the effect of making the whole combination more sturdy and inflexible and providing a means of adjusting for the center of gravity on whatever support you are using. It also makes a for good carrying handle ! A commercial version of this can be found here - http://www.ebay.com/itm/140971397996?_trksid=p2060778.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT#ht_2636wt_1325 - called a "splint".







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Dec 12, 2014 14:26:22   #
Jim Kresge
 
Thanks Imagemeister. Have to wear my glasses when shooting but the chin brace looks like it could be very helpful.

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Dec 12, 2014 20:03:11   #
transponder
 
I must admit that Imagemeister has some great ideas for holding long lenses. I used to use a handgun type grip on my 500mm and 135mm short mount telephoto when doing macro. With both of these lenses it was necessary to hold the camera solid against the face. These were fully manual lenses. Use a cable or some external shutter release, and select the proper ISO for the shutter speed you need. I have found most times in competitions INTEREST and COMPOSITION will trump OVERALL TECHNICAL QUALITY. Shoot wide open if you need to.

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Dec 12, 2014 21:11:37   #
SharpShooter Loc: NorCal
 
Meister, that would definately NOT work on a bobble-head doll ! :lol:
SS

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Jan 15, 2015 15:10:58   #
Mondolinni Loc: Long Island, New York
 
imagemeister wrote:
Since none of my longer lenses have IS/OS/VC, and since I regularly shoot at 600mm, I have been on a quest for maximum stabilisation techniques for some time now. Having adequate support for the lens/camera is a big part of the equation. But beyond that, there are still other things you could/should do. On longer lenses, having a firm grip towards the front of the lens works well for me. Pushing the camera against your face at the moment of exposure is another sharpness technique with high merits from my experience.
So, my first thought was to install an extended eyepice on my Canon's - and that was better. Then I thought, I really need broader contact areas for even better stabilisation properties and comfort. I searched the net and found nothing of what I was looking for. So, I decided to make it. I went to Ace and got a "T brace" that had some holes already drilled in it and bent the "T" part at 90 degree angle in a vice and installed a piece of self stick insulating foam to the "T" part. I then ordered off ebay some metal feet that fit in the accessory shoe on the top of the camera with a 1/4-20 stud - for the forehead brace. the bottom chin brace is held by a screw in the tripod socket. This results in exceptional stability and comfort ! - and makes me wonder why I have never seen this or thought of it before in my 40 + years in photography ! See below........
I now consider this hardware/technique to be indispensable in obtaining maximum sharpness at 300-600mm focal lengths. You will also find this keeps sweat from getting into your navigation wheels and other switches on the back of your camera. It also affords you a little more room to use BBF if you are left eyed like me.
If anyone knows of the commercial availability of similar hardware, please let us know !
Since none of my longer lenses have IS/OS/VC, and ... (show quote)


Very well done Imagemeister !

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Jan 15, 2015 19:07:36   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
transponder wrote:
I have found most times in competitions INTEREST and COMPOSITION will trump OVERALL TECHNICAL QUALITY. Shoot wide open if you need to.


I agree ......tis sad but true !

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Jan 15, 2015 19:08:29   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
Jim Kresge wrote:
Thanks Imagemeister. Have to wear my glasses when shooting but the chin brace looks like it could be very helpful.


:-) Thanks !

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Jan 15, 2015 19:09:10   #
imagemeister Loc: Stuart, Florida
 
Mondolinni wrote:
Very well done Imagemeister !


Thanks for stopping by with your nice comment !

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