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C Prints...Printing paper
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Jul 12, 2014 06:35:19   #
OnDSnap
 
Years ago back in the film days (70's to be specific) I used to have prints made in NY & NJ and we called them "C prints" for the type paper (not Ceber Chrome), and for the life of me I can't remember what was it's official name or brand. I could walk into (back then) any custom print shop and just tell them I want a C print aside from other instructions.
I'm looking for a paper similar in today's papers to use with my Epson 3880, I've yet to find one with similar qualities and texture...anyone know of one? It's getting expensive buying and trying...only to find out, Nope this ain't it.
Thanks,
Doug

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Jul 12, 2014 06:56:47   #
Searcher
 
OnDSnap wrote:
Years ago back in the film days (70's to be specific) I used to have prints made in NY & NJ and we called them "C prints" for the type paper (not Ceber Chrome), and for the life of me I can't remember what was it's official name or brand. I could walk into (back then) any custom print shop and just tell them I want a C print aside from other instructions.
I'm looking for a paper similar in today's papers to use with my Epson 3880, I've yet to find one with similar qualities and texture...anyone know of one? It's getting expensive buying and trying...only to find out, Nope this ain't it.
Thanks,
Doug
Years ago back in the film days (70's to be specif... (show quote)


I used to print from negatives to Kodak papers without ever knowing I was producing a C-print.

Quote from http://56x56.com/writings/printing/inkjet-or-pigment-prints-versus-digital-c-prints/

"Digital C-prints, on the other hand, are the result of printing a digital file on a continuous tone printer that uses silver-based paper. The photograph is created by exposing the paper with light sources (such as lasers or LEDs) and then processing the exposed paper with traditional chemistry. The most common papers are type-C papers (usually Fuji Crystal Archive, which is the best) processed in RA-4 chemistry. The continuous tone printers include the Lightjet, Durst Lambda, and the Chromira, and labs that make these types of prints will usually advertise that they use one of those three brands."

Quite a lot of info on this site regarding C-Prints.

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Jul 12, 2014 07:28:35   #
OnDSnap
 
Searcher wrote:
I used to print from negatives to Kodak papers without ever knowing I was producing a C-print.

Quote from http://56x56.com/writings/printing/inkjet-or-pigment-prints-versus-digital-c-prints/

"Digital C-prints, on the other hand, are the result of printing a digital file on a continuous tone printer that uses silver-based paper. The photograph is created by exposing the paper with light sources (such as lasers or LEDs) and then processing the exposed paper with traditional chemistry. The most common papers are type-C papers (usually Fuji Crystal Archive, which is the best) processed in RA-4 chemistry. The continuous tone printers include the Lightjet, Durst Lambda, and the Chromira, and labs that make these types of prints will usually advertise that they use one of those three brands."

Quite a lot of info on this site regarding C-Prints.
I used to print from negatives to Kodak papers wit... (show quote)


Thanks, I know there is a lot of info for Digital C prints here and on the web...my question though has nothing to do with the process, I'm looking for a particular matte finish paper everyone used back then when doing C-(Chromogenic)printing and Dye transfers. In fact I think the lab we used to use was Pace Color labs in NYC...and True Color in NJ, both no longer there to call. But they both used a type paper when doing C prints and I was asking if any of the older guys/gals remember the paper and what in today's papers will yield the same results. I have photos I had made back then and I'm looking for paper similar to my older prints. All I have tried is close but not quite there. Just wondering if anyone one has used anything that I might try.

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Jul 12, 2014 07:39:05   #
davidheald1942
 
Hi OnSnap.
Back in the 70's most all labs used Kodak
paper and Kodak chemicals. You are probably thinking
of matte paper.
ronny



OnDSnap wrote:
Thanks, I know there is a lot of info for Digital C prints here and on the web...my question though has nothing to do with the process, I'm looking for a particular matte finish paper everyone used back then when doing C-(Chromogenic)printing and Dye transfers. In fact I think the lab we used to use was Pace Color labs in NYC...and True Color in NJ, both no longer there to call. But they both used a type paper when doing C prints and I was asking if any of the older guys/gals remember the paper and what in today's papers will yield the same results. I have photos I had made back then and I'm looking for paper similar to my older prints. All I have tried is close but not quite there. Just wondering if anyone one has used anything that I might try.
Thanks, I know there is a lot of info for Digital ... (show quote)

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Jul 12, 2014 08:35:18   #
OnDSnap
 
Thanks David, very possible, I just found that the owner of Pace Color labs (Bob Pace)is now under the name Graphic Process Co. In Hollywood Ca....I'll give him a call Monday, he may just remember what was used when he printed for the company I was doing work for. They were very specific in what they wanted, with any luck, he may just recall.

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Jul 14, 2014 22:33:13   #
romanticf16
 
OnDSnap wrote:
Years ago back in the film days (70's to be specific) I used to have prints made in NY & NJ and we called them "C prints" for the type paper (not Ceber Chrome), and for the life of me I can't remember what was it's official name or brand. I could walk into (back then) any custom print shop and just tell them I want a C print aside from other instructions.
I'm looking for a paper similar in today's papers to use with my Epson 3880, I've yet to find one with similar qualities and texture...anyone know of one? It's getting expensive buying and trying...only to find out, Nope this ain't it.
Thanks,
Doug
Years ago back in the film days (70's to be specif... (show quote)

The two surfaces for photographic color paper were/are Glossy and N Surface, a slightly stippled but shiny surface that didn't show fingerprints as much as glossy. You should be able to find a surface similar to N in Epson paper.

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Jul 14, 2014 22:45:58   #
SharpShooter
 
OnD, have you ordered sample packs, such as those from Red River? I think all companies have them. RR's has 20 different papers with two of each for around $20. That's a lot of different surfaces!! ;-)
SS

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Jul 15, 2014 06:07:34   #
OnDSnap
 
romanticf16 wrote:
The two surfaces for photographic color paper were/are Glossy and N Surface, a slightly stippled but shiny surface that didn't show fingerprints as much as glossy. You should be able to find a surface similar to N in Epson paper.


Yeah, I don't use glossy at all unless someone requests it...other surfaces I've tried so far have not yielded the same results.

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Jul 15, 2014 06:09:13   #
OnDSnap
 
SharpShooter wrote:
OnD, have you ordered sample packs, such as those from Red River? I think all companies have them. RR's has 20 different papers with two of each for around $20. That's a lot of different surfaces!! ;-)
SS


I'll give RR and Hahnemühle a try.

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