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Canon vs Nikon: Which is better?
One camera setting that ruins your pictures
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Photo Analysis
Novice question
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Aug 29, 2016 08:36:41   #
NotAnselAdams
 
I am an amateur picture taker. You'll notice I don't call myself a photographer. I recently went to an RC aircraft "fly in". I would like to know recommended settings for shooting aircraft in movement. My difficulty was in getting a moving aircraft, in this case a P-47 Thunderbolt, in focus as it flew by. I used a Canon D70 with an 18 to 135 lens in auto mode. I've reviewed "You Tube" but some of the explanations are long-winded and confusing. I'd appreciate any recommendations. Thanks
Mac


 
Aug 29, 2016 08:39:49   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
NotAnselAdams wrote:
I am an amateur picture taker. You'll notice I don't call myself a photographer.


I do the same thing. "Are you a photographer?" "Well, I take pictures."

I'm sure you'll get good suggestions for photographing planes. High ISO and fast shutter are a couple of ideas that come to mind. A larger aperture would allow for a greater depth of field.
Aug 29, 2016 08:42:23   #
NotAnselAdams
 
Copy. Thanks. Tripod or free hold?
Mac
Aug 29, 2016 08:51:57   #
Pablo8 (a regular here)
 
jerryc41 wrote:
I do the same thing. "Are you a photographer?" "Well, I take pictures."

I'm sure you'll get good suggestions for photographing planes. High ISO and fast shutter are a couple of ideas that come to mind. A larger aperture would allow for a greater depth of field.


***********************************************************************
I always advocate that " A larger aperture will give you a more shallow depth of field" It has worked for me since 1959, and my 40 plus years as a Pro' Photographer. Misinformation does not help anyone, especially a 'Novice'.
Aug 29, 2016 08:53:37   #
NotAnselAdams
 
Thank you. Any hints on getting the aircraft in focus when it is at a distance and moving toward or away from you?
Mac
Aug 29, 2016 08:59:48   #
Leitz
 
Pablo8 wrote:
***********************************************************************
I always advocate that " A larger aperture will give you a more shallow depth of field"...

Obviously you are a photographer!!
 
Aug 29, 2016 09:02:26   #
Leitz
 
NotAnselAdams wrote:
Thank you. Any hints on getting the aircraft in focus when it is at a distance and moving toward or away from you?
Mac

If you use "Quote Reply" instead of "Reply" or "Quick Reply, "we'll know to whom you are responding.
Aug 29, 2016 09:11:15   #
markngolf (a regular here)
 
My friend is an advanced photographer and shoots flying birds. He has had fantastic results. Maybe some of his techniques will help with flying planes. This is his setup. It is a bit advanced, but maybe some suggestions might be helpful. You might also find help by using "Search" tool - top of page and type photographing flying planes.
Good luck.
Mark

I use the C1, C2 and C3 setting for birds normally. I save the C3 with: manual exposure, aperture and shutter speed and ISO for proper exposure in trees or bushes with good light, 5 focusing points, back button focus. Then I change the focusing points to 15 auto and possibly the exposure and save as C2. This is for flying birds with the sky as the background. I like the advantage of more focusing points and auto selection because it is easier to lock on focus and there is nothing in the background to compete for the focus. I then change the settings to Aperture preferred, 5 or 9 focusing points, and save as C1. This setting is good for everything else and especially where the lighting and/or background is different than the more uniform lighting conditions for C2 & C3.

The secret is Always know what setting you are currently on so you quickly change the dial without lowering the camera from your face to see what setting to go to.

You can always use your regular Aperture preferred setting on the dial as normal so you can have 4 different settings by just changing the dial. The reason I use C3 as my main "go to" is because if I am on Aperture preferred, I can simply turn the dial all the way and I am "home" and then turn the dial one or two clicks to either of the other settings if preferred.

One other pointer, if it is cloudy and the sun goes in and out, remember to either keep changing the exposure for C2 and C3 and SAVE OR just go to C1. A second pointer is to remember that if you change anything (like exposure compensation on C1) and go to C2 or C3 and back to C1, the exposure compensation will resort back to the saved settings. I do use the C1 setting a lot and change the exposure compensation as needed for proper exposure. The C2 and C3 settings are especially useful for flying birds with consistent lighting.

NotAnselAdams wrote:
I am an amateur picture taker. You'll notice I don't call myself a photographer. I recently went to an RC aircraft "fly in". I would like to know recommended settings for shooting aircraft in movement. My difficulty was in getting a moving aircraft, in this case a P-47 Thunderbolt, in focus as it flew by. I used a Canon D70 with an 18 to 135 lens in auto mode. I've reviewed "You Tube" but some of the explanations are long-winded and confusing. I'd appreciate any recommendations. Thanks
Mac
I am an amateur picture taker. You'll notice I do... (show quote)
Aug 29, 2016 09:12:31   #
Silverman (a regular here)
 
For a Newbie; maybe try "Shutter-Priority", to assist in capturing the motion of the RC planes in flight. I would think that a Tripod in this setting may be too restrictive, those little planes fly by so quickly. Other more experienced in your photography efforts may have more suggestions too.
Aug 29, 2016 09:25:33   #
marki3rd
 
Pablo8 wrote:
***********************************************************************
I always advocate that " A larger aperture will give you a more shallow depth of field" It has worked for me since 1959, and my 40 plus years as a Pro' Photographer. Misinformation does not help anyone, especially a 'Novice'.


I think Jerry meant a larger aperture number which is really the denominator of a fraction, so as you point out, the larger the number the smaller the the aperture and the greater the DOF. He could have explained himself better, but most of us knew what he meant and don't find it necessary to correct him.
Aug 29, 2016 09:27:37   #
ggttc (a regular here)
 
As far as keeping the aircraft in focus..pick it up in your viewfinder as soon as you see it and keep tracking it until it gets within range. Set your camera to high speed continuous...use 9 or 15 focus points.

As soon as it gets in the range you want press your shutter halfway down to focus and shoot away.

Auto is ok but shutter priority is your best bet...400 to 600.
 
Aug 29, 2016 09:37:36   #
Techman
 
NotAnselAdams wrote:
I am an amateur picture taker. You'll notice I don't call myself a photographer. I recently went to an RC aircraft "fly in". I would like to know recommended settings for shooting aircraft in movement. My difficulty was in getting a moving aircraft, in this case a P-47 Thunderbolt, in focus as it flew by. I used a Canon D70 with an 18 to 135 lens in auto mode. I've reviewed "You Tube" but some of the explanations are long-winded and confusing. I'd appreciate any recommendations. Thanks
Mac
I am an amateur picture taker. You'll notice I do... (show quote)


I have been shooting RC aircraft for 20+ years with Sony cameras. I have found that the following setting works for me, and can be duplicated on your Canon; use the scene selector set at "Sport". This should set the lens at 1/2000 sec and automatically set the aperture and iso. Focus should be "continuous". Also, set the camera for multiple shots; your camera is capable of 7 fps.

I originally tried to manually set my camera, but with the speed and distance of the plane constantly changing I managed to get 1 out of 10 shots that were in focus, not blurred, and worth saving. If you want to shoot manually, use a minimum speed of 1/500 or greater, aperture priority setting based on available light or priority. Remember, you may be shooting against a bright sky and a dark plane, so if possible, try to get the aircraft against clouds which will enhance the photo.

I have attached a few pictures (of the thousands) that I have taken over the years.

Good luck and keep shooting!


(Download)


(Download)


(Download)


(Download)
Aug 29, 2016 09:43:10   #
anotherview
 
Good morning. You say, "I used a Canon D70." Nikon makes a D70, and Canon makes a 70D. Which do you have?

Yes, like you, in the beginning, I didn't call myself a photographer. I held the belief, and still do, that a photographer has photographic skills, and understands things like Exposure and Composition along with the importance of Subject. So I'd say at the time, "I'm trying." After about 8 years or so of working at it, I began thinking of myself as a photographer. It helped that one of my photographs won third place in an international photo contest.

As to tracking an aircraft in flight, your camera, if a Canon, very likely has two focus modes for this purpose. Read more here:

https://support.usa.canon.com/kb/index?page=content&id=ART109313

AF Modes: Differences between One-Shot AF, AI Servo AF, and AI Focus AF

Using thes focus tracking modes does require some practice, but it works well for shooting airborne aircraft.

Note that you will want to use Exposure Compensation to over-expose the shots of airborne aircraft, by one or one-and-a-half stops. Otherwise, the metering system will average the exposure and give the bright sky too much weight, thus under-exposing the aircraft. Experiment with this over-exposure using EC while in the field. If you move around, then you may need to tweak this EC for a good exposure.

Good luck.
NotAnselAdams wrote:
I am an amateur picture taker. You'll notice I don't call myself a photographer. I recently went to an RC aircraft "fly in". I would like to know recommended settings for shooting aircraft in movement. My difficulty was in getting a moving aircraft, in this case a P-47 Thunderbolt, in focus as it flew by. I used a Canon D70 with an 18 to 135 lens in auto mode. I've reviewed "You Tube" but some of the explanations are long-winded and confusing. I'd appreciate any recommendations. Thanks
Mac
I am an amateur picture taker. You'll notice I do... (show quote)
Aug 29, 2016 09:58:19   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
jerryc41 wrote:
I do the same thing. "Are you a photographer?" "Well, I take pictures."

A larger aperture would allow for a greater depth of field.


Whoops! I should have said smaller aperture.
Aug 29, 2016 10:06:00   #
Leitz
 
jerryc41 wrote:
Whoops! I should have said smaller aperture.

We should all accept correction so gracefully!
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