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Do my hands shake this much?
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Jul 5, 2016 20:05:00   #
timspix
 
This shot was taken using a monopod and a 20mm kenko extension tube. I do get some sharp images with the kenko tubes ... but I also get a lot of soft ones. AND I also get plenty of soft ones w/o the tubes. So it begs the question ... with a shutter speed of 1/80 second, on a monopod, on my back deck, ISO 400 ... is this softness due to camera motion ... or could it be something else? Is perhaps the focus point even nearer to the camera such that none of the flower is in the focal plane?


(Download)
 
Jul 5, 2016 20:11:38   #
timspix
 
OK ... either I was steadier on this one ... or my hypothesis of the first one being entirely beyond the plane of focus may be correct ... this one has some stamens in focus ...


(Download)
Jul 5, 2016 21:01:25   #
robertjerl (a regular here)
 
timspix wrote:
This shot was taken using a monopod and a 20mm kenko extension tube. I do get some sharp images with the kenko tubes ... but I also get a lot of soft ones. AND I also get plenty of soft ones w/o the tubes. So it begs the question ... with a shutter speed of 1/80 second, on a monopod, on my back deck, ISO 400 ... is this softness due to camera motion ... or could it be something else? Is perhaps the focus point even nearer to the camera such that none of the flower is in the focal plane?


Use a tripod and a higher shutter speed, also mirror lockup. F/11 or f/16 might help also, more DOF. I use f/20 and about 1/500 on outdoor flowers that the breeze might move. I also use a speedlight sometimes. Most of my macro is done with a 6D, some with a 7DII. I let the ISO float on auto with a limit set of 6400 on the 6D and 3200 on the 7DII. I tried 6400 on the 7 but then noise reduction in PP spoiled the sharpness.
Jul 5, 2016 21:24:13   #
timspix
 
thanks ... I recently tried going up to f16 (max on the 50mm 1.8) and 22 on the 70-210 ... and got soft results as well ... I put that down (maybe erroneously) to diffraction issues ... so here I did a quick couple of shots using a monopod and middle range aperture ... the low DOF is not bothering me as I am trying out an idea to put together a series that focuses just on the stamens / pistils as being in focus.
Jul 5, 2016 22:36:45   #
robertjerl (a regular here)
 
timspix wrote:
thanks ... I recently tried going up to f16 (max on the 50mm 1.8) and 22 on the 70-210 ... and got soft results as well ... I put that down (maybe erroneously) to diffraction issues ... so here I did a quick couple of shots using a monopod and middle range aperture ... the low DOF is not bothering me as I am trying out an idea to put together a series that focuses just on the stamens / pistils as being in focus.


If that is what you are aiming at I really recommend a tripod because those are small targets for handheld or monopod (which I think of as a swaying pod because it still moves, just not as much.) I just got a geared head that I have yet to try for macro, I plan to team it with a geared focus rail on my bigger/heavier tripod for macro. Use the head and rail to get everything framed and the subject in focus, remote shutter release, delayed shutter and mirror lock up. Then try to time it so the wind isn't moving the flower.
Jul 5, 2016 23:03:52   #
timspix
 
Had a little better luck with the spider plant blossom ...


(Download)
 
Jul 6, 2016 00:05:56   #
robertjerl (a regular here)
 
Jul 6, 2016 06:53:29   #
OnDSnap
 
timspix wrote:
This shot was taken using a monopod and a 20mm kenko extension tube. I do get some sharp images with the kenko tubes ... but I also get a lot of soft ones. AND I also get plenty of soft ones w/o the tubes. So it begs the question ... with a shutter speed of 1/80 second, on a monopod, on my back deck, ISO 400 ... is this softness due to camera motion ... or could it be something else? Is perhaps the focus point even nearer to the camera such that none of the flower is in the focal plane?


Using a mono pod with such shallow DOF, (maybe a 1/4" or so) I think you could be swaying to and fro without realizing it ...also your breathing could be enough to cause the the rig to sway. Try using a tripod to eliminate the possibility of the above. At the very least, you'll eliminate a possible cause.
Jul 6, 2016 06:57:50   #
Day.Old.Pizza
 
timspix wrote:
This shot was taken using a monopod and a 20mm kenko extension tube. I do get some sharp images with the kenko tubes ... but I also get a lot of soft ones. AND I also get plenty of soft ones w/o the tubes. So it begs the question ... with a shutter speed of 1/80 second, on a monopod, on my back deck, ISO 400 ... is this softness due to camera motion ... or could it be something else? Is perhaps the focus point even nearer to the camera such that none of the flower is in the focal plane?


The blossom is turned. The side closest to the camera is in focus, but the other side, further away from the camera is not. This may be caused by a too shallow depth of field. Try it again, but decrease your aperture opening (if again shooting from an angle) or keep your original settings, but take your shot from where the entire flower is the same distance from the camera.
Jul 6, 2016 08:10:33   #
zigipha
 
OnDSnap wrote:
Using a mono pod with such shallow DOF, (maybe a 1/4" or so) I think you could be swaying to and fro without realizing it ...also your breathing could be enough to cause the the rig to sway. Try using a tripod to eliminate the possibility of the above. At the very least, you'll eliminate a possible cause.




put the camera on a chair or table (stepstool) and try again see if the dof issue can be eliminated (does not matter the subject)
Jul 6, 2016 08:35:09   #
rmm0605 (a regular here)
 
timspix wrote:
This shot was taken using a monopod and a 20mm kenko extension tube. I do get some sharp images with the kenko tubes ... but I also get a lot of soft ones. AND I also get plenty of soft ones w/o the tubes. So it begs the question ... with a shutter speed of 1/80 second, on a monopod, on my back deck, ISO 400 ... is this softness due to camera motion ... or could it be something else? Is perhaps the focus point even nearer to the camera such that none of the flower is in the focal plane?


It looks like more than one issue. First one is depth of field. DOF is too shallow to capture the whole flower. You need to shoot at f5.6 or higher, depending on how close you are to the subject. Second, there may be some motion, but it may just be a focus issue.
 
Jul 6, 2016 10:41:14   #
Kuzano (a regular here)
 
Easy enough to test.

Simply take you out of the equation. For a "do I shake that much" test.... set up your shot with a good tripod, and use a remote shutter release. This proves whether or not you are part of the problem.

Also, is the shot a "set up" tabletop shot or are you outside and might natural movement from wind, etc be the problem.

Have never had much luck with Mono pods. I get better results for stability with a "String Pod" (home made) and most certainly with a good tripod. My current tripod is a Bogen 3021... It's a tank and tall enough that I don't need to use the center post--the flaw in any tripod--extensive extension of the center post.

Anyway, if you're not touching the rig and not snapping the shutter, you didn't create the problem. Monopod... Phooey!!! Great for a walking stick-Not so with a camera! Carry a string pod in your pocket or bag.
Jul 6, 2016 11:37:09   #
canon Lee (a regular here)
 
timspix wrote:
This shot was taken using a monopod and a 20mm kenko extension tube. I do get some sharp images with the kenko tubes ... but I also get a lot of soft ones. AND I also get plenty of soft ones w/o the tubes. So it begs the question ... with a shutter speed of 1/80 second, on a monopod, on my back deck, ISO 400 ... is this softness due to camera motion ... or could it be something else? Is perhaps the focus point even nearer to the camera such that none of the flower is in the focal plane?


Hi camera shake is a real problem with a shallow depth of field. If you do a lot of macro shooting I would suggest putting the camera on a tripod and using a WIFI device like CamRanger.com, which your camera would be controlled hands free remotely. It also operates on a iPad which will give you large detail.
Jul 6, 2016 13:33:40   #
cambriaman (a regular here)
 
The comment from canon Lee seems correct. I suggest settling on one systemic protocol (such as tripod, cable release, extension tube, fast shutter, moderate
f ./stop) and to practice it until it is consistent in results and automatic. Good thing you aren't using film!
Jul 6, 2016 20:56:06   #
Szalajj (a regular here)
 
timspix wrote:
Had a little better luck with the spider plant blossom ...

I'm going to ask a question about the white flower, and yellow stamens.

Were you only trying to get those stamen tips in focus?

There have been lots of comments about the out of focus white flower, but I'm guessing that you were actually trying to obtain the effect you got.

But, as someone earlier mentioned, the angle is wrong to get all of them in focus, when you are using such a shallow depth of field.

So, getting back to the discussion about your hands shaking, and using a monopod. They might work for BIF, but when you're trying to shoot in an up close or macro setting, they are worthless. Tripods are needed in these situations, and a slightly faster shutter speed to freeze any movement of your subject that could be caused by a breeze.
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