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Canon vs Nikon: Which is better?
Here is the truth one of them doesn't want you to know
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Main Photography Discussion
Photo Editing Software?
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Aug 19, 2013 10:58:19   #
Armadillo
 
Gingivitis Khan wrote:
Corel PaintShop Pro will do just about everything that PhotoShop will do. I used Corel PhotoPaint (it's the PSP version that comes with Corel Draw) for 15 years and it did the job just fine. I moved up to PhotoShop CS5 because I wanted to do more elaborate edits (special effects and stuff) and all the tutorials I found were for PS. It really wasn't worth the money. PaintShop Pro can be had for $50 ($60 for the Deluxe version) often... they're always running sales on it.


Gingivitis Khan,

In addition to your comments, the available plugins for Adobe (.8bf) will perform just as well in Paint Shop Pro, and the greater majority are free. For more extensive editing commercial plugins can be purchased and will work just as well in Adobe and PSP.

Michael G
 
Aug 19, 2013 10:59:24   #
DaveHam
 
If you have not worked with processing RAW files for output yet you might want o check out the 'freebies' like GIMP, picasa on Google and then YouTube for some basics on how to use them before you jump in and buy something.

For straightforward processing of a RAW image these freebies do a good job, so you may want to start there before deciding what it is you want.

I know I wish I had done this those years ago before I spent huge amounts over time on Adobe.
Aug 19, 2013 21:46:37   #
mikegreenwald
 
rusty nails wrote:
Here is a example of what lightroom 4 can do for your pictures

(link removed for spamming)forum/editing-and-presentation/252826-mastering-lightroom-tip-using-brushes-to-add-colors-and-contrast-to-your-photos#278865


Wonderful site! I absolutely will subscribe, and thank you for the reference!
Aug 19, 2013 22:12:53   #
mwsilvers (a regular here)
 
Bradford wrote:
I have always shot in JPG only because it has been easiest and most convenient - yes I am probably ignorant. I am now going to step off into RAW format.


There is absolutely nothing wrong with shooting in JPEG. Even JPEG files can be modified, albeit to a lesser degree than raw files. Raw does have its advantages over JPEG, but the immediate thing you will see and go "huh" about is that unlike JPEGS, raw images do not contain any of the in-camera settings and will usually look flatter, with less contrast and less sharpness than an identical JPEG. Basically with a raw file you are starting with blank canvas. This can more easily be seen if you shoot in both raw and JPEG and compare them on your computer. Having said that I shoot 100% in RAW on my Canon 60D. I use Lightoom 5 as my main post processing software. I also use Canon's Digital Photo Professional software (DPP), which unlike 3rd party software lets you process Canon raw files with the in-camera settings applied.
Aug 20, 2013 01:15:52   #
wlgoode
 
lighthouse wrote:
My advice would be Elements and/or Lightroom.


GIMP + UFRaw plugin is free and as powerful as PS. And like most Open Source apps, regular updates are free and has a smaller footprint on your computer.
Aug 20, 2013 09:16:19   #
warrior (a regular here)
 
:thumbup:
 
Aug 20, 2013 10:13:05   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
The usual advice on this forum is to start with something free, inexpensive or simple. Then, move "up".

In other words, invest the time to learn one, then another and then yet another. Could that be a waste of time?

Why not start with the premier product with the widest variety and most complete selection of learning resources?
Aug 20, 2013 10:35:47   #
Armadillo
 
bsprague wrote:
The usual advice on this forum is to start with something free, inexpensive or simple. Then, move "up".

In other words, invest the time to learn one, then another and then yet another. Could that be a waste of time?

Why not start with the premier product with the widest variety and most complete selection of learning resources?


Bill,

"In other words, invest the time to learn one, then another and then yet another. Could that be a waste of time?"

Time is only valuable to you, it has no value to anyone else. If you work for an employer, and you are paid $10.00 per hour, would he/she be happier if you were paid $2.50 per hour?

"Why not start with the premier product with the widest variety and most complete selection of learning resources?"

Because the "Primer Product" may cost several hundred dollars, very difficult to learn (long learning curve), and beyond the user's ability to grasp the concepts to become efficient with the product. The "Free Product" says it all, it's Free. If you can't make it work you have only invested your own time, no financial cost. If it does work and you find it useable you have learned some important concepts, concepts that can be used on the expensive products.

30 day trial versions, or limited use versions may not be enough time to make a good decision before spending up to $750.00 for the high priced software.

Michael G
Aug 20, 2013 11:06:53   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
Armadillo wrote:
Because the "Premier Product" may cost several hundred dollars, very difficult to learn (long learning curve), and beyond the user's ability to grasp the concepts to become efficient with the product. The "Free Product" says it all, it's Free. If you can't make it work you have only invested your own time, no financial cost. If it does work and you find it useable you have learned some important concepts, concepts that can be used on the expensive products.

30 day trial versions, or limited use versions may not be enough time to make a good decision before spending up to $750.00 for the high priced software.

Michael G
Because the "Premier Product" may cost s... (show quote)

Michael,

The premier product for RAW is Lightroom. If you pay the highest price possible it is $150. The OP that asked the question is shooting with a D7100. It is a new model, so it is likely he/she paid around $1200 without a lens. The Costo kit for that camera with lenses is closer to $2K.

With Lightroom the essentials on the learning curve are short. An hour watching J Kost's free videos on Adobe TV will demonstrate the very intuitive use of sliders for RAW processing. One of my charming granddaughters did her first photo in Lighroom in 20 minutes without watching J Kost. How hard can it be to move the exposure, color temperature and contrast sliders back and forth?

The only hard part about Lightroom for me was getting my head wrapped around the notion and workflow of non-destructive editing. How did they figure out how to make it possible to do all that adjusting without ever ruining the original?

If the OP can make a D7100 work, he/she can make Lightroom work with one eye closed.
Aug 20, 2013 13:19:41   #
wlgoode
 
bsprague wrote:
The usual advice on this forum is to start with something free, inexpensive or simple. Then, move "up".

In other words, invest the time to learn one, then another and then yet another. Could that be a waste of time?

Why not start with the premier product with the widest variety and most complete selection of learning resources?


There is nothing to move up to from GIMP. With it's nearly 1000 plugins it is more powerful than PS. If spending $700 for something similar is "moving up", go right ahead.

There are many who would criticize GIMP because it takes so many plugins, so what? Open Source apps are generally designed to be very customizable.
Aug 20, 2013 13:28:46   #
Armadillo
 
bsprague wrote:
Michael,

The premier product for RAW is Lightroom. If you pay the highest price possible it is $150. The OP that asked the question is shooting with a D7100. It is a new model, so it is likely he/she paid around $1200 without a lens. The Costo kit for that camera with lenses is closer to $2K.

With Lightroom the essentials on the learning curve are short. An hour watching J Kost's free videos on Adobe TV will demonstrate the very intuitive use of sliders for RAW processing. One of my charming granddaughters did her first photo in Lighroom in 20 minutes without watching J Kost. How hard can it be to move the exposure, color temperature and contrast sliders back and forth?

The only hard part about Lightroom for me was getting my head wrapped around the notion and workflow of non-destructive editing. How did they figure out how to make it possible to do all that adjusting without ever ruining the original?

If the OP can make a D7100 work, he/she can make Lightroom work with one eye closed.
Michael, br br The premier product for RAW is Li... (show quote)


Hello Bill,

I must have misunderstood the original post as I was thinking the premier PP software was PhotoShop. I just took a look at Amazon.com for a price check, and it is tad bit less expensive than I thought. A screen shot is attached below.
PhotoShop from Amazon.com

 
Aug 20, 2013 13:52:21   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
Armadillo wrote:
Hello Bill,

I must have misunderstood the original post as I was thinking the premier PP software was PhotoShop. I just took a look at Amazon.com for a price check, and it is tad bit less expensive than I thought. A screen shot is attached below.

My view is that Photoshop, and most of the rest of CS5, CS5.5, CS6 and CC is for "Graphic Artists" that may want to make cartoons or animations for web sites. Lightroom is for "Photographers" that make pictures. And, since Lightroom integrates the handling of RAW files "under the hood", the inevitable photo adjustment process is as intuitive as .jpeg files.

There are probably some special circumstances where other products do better than Lightroom, but it does cover the broad range of what camera users do.
Aug 20, 2013 16:15:36   #
G Brown
 
Go elements - got the most tutorials in both the written and you tube formats. Then you will need to calibrate everything from your eyes to your electric pencil. Then buy a specific camera to take what you want to shoot - not all cameras can take pictures of everything seemingly. To take better pictures immediately upgrade - that's apparently how photography works. Once you have got around to reading a camera manual buy full photoshop, lightroom, topaz and whatever else has rave reviews in the press before deciding to buy a Bridge Camera - When you say you are considering a bridge it can be considered as a final cry for help. However, as dead photographers are always better than living ones, it won't really make much difference whether you shoot in Raw or Jpeg after all. As for manipulation - well, as a total professional you would not have even considered doing any obviously.
Aug 20, 2013 16:34:10   #
bsprague (a regular here)
 
G Brown wrote:
Go elements - got the most tutorials in both the written and you tube formats. Then you will need to calibrate everything from your eyes to your electric pencil. Then buy a specific camera to take what you want to shoot - not all cameras can take pictures of everything seemingly. To take better pictures immediately upgrade - that's apparently how photography works. Once you have got around to reading a camera manual buy full photoshop, lightroom, topaz and whatever else has rave reviews in the press before deciding to buy a Bridge Camera - When you say you are considering a bridge it can be considered as a final cry for help. However, as dead photographers are always better than living ones, it won't really make much difference whether you shoot in Raw or Jpeg after all. As for manipulation - well, as a total professional you would not have even considered doing any obviously.
Go elements - got the most tutorials in both the w... (show quote)

Well written! GAS = Gear Addiction Syndrome. It does not lead to better photography.
Aug 20, 2013 17:29:58   #
DaveHam
 
The professional RAW editing software of choice is - was - Adobe Photoshop. Although Lightroom has a lot of the features of Photoshop it does not have all of them by any stretch of anyone's imagination.

Unfortunately Adobe has decided to move to what it laughingly refers to as a 'cloud based, monthly subscription model' for Photoshop beyond CS6 so anyone not wanting to hang on the pricing policies of Adobe now is limited to Lightroom. Which is a great product but is not the absolute choice of RAW users.

However if you are new to RAW post processing the first thing to do may be to understand what post is. Many photographers use RAW to enable them to better recover from problems with a digital image, such as changes to white balance, exposure etc. Others want to be able to modify the appearance of the image ranging from perhaps adding more tone and saturation through to editing out elements that they do not want to see. Other's may be more ambitious still posting to produce something bearing little relation to the original.

Perhaps having a play with the freebies will enable you to get to grips with the options before making a purchase which ends up not meeting your needs.

There are any number of freebies. Other software firms offer trial periods, so Corel PaintShop and similar could be considered.
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