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Posts for: photoman43
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Feb 19, 2024 12:42:41   #
photoman43 wrote:
I am red green and blue grey color blind. I can see colors, so I am just partially color blind. I learned about this when I took my military physicals back in the 1960s.

I make sure I set things correctly in the camera, like white balance, and other settings to get the film look I want--maybe Vivid or Standard. In post processing, I make almost no color changes as I do not trust my ability to properly see all of them. This approach would work for just about any post processing program.

When I have an image with complicated color issues or dramatic colors, I use the Nikon software to view the RAW file and make a Tiff to use in another post processing program. I shoot with Nikon cameras. This approach could work for you too. Just use the raw processor supported by your camera manufacturer.
I am red green and blue grey color blind. I can se... (show quote)


I should have added, that I now am using DXO-PL7 elite edition to process my raw files from my Nikon cameras.
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Feb 19, 2024 10:10:01   #
I am red green and blue grey color blind. I can see colors, so I am just partially color blind. I learned about this when I took my military physicals back in the 1960s.

I make sure I set things correctly in the camera, like white balance, and other settings to get the film look I want--maybe Vivid or Standard. In post processing, I make almost no color changes as I do not trust my ability to properly see all of them. This approach would work for just about any post processing program.

When I have an image with complicated color issues or dramatic colors, I use the Nikon software to view the RAW file and make a Tiff to use in another post processing program. I shoot with Nikon cameras. This approach could work for you too. Just use the raw processor supported by your camera manufacturer.
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Feb 18, 2024 11:27:10   #
I have a suggestion that has little to do with your location. It deals with proper exposure and focus. I have learned the hard way from less than sharp images at air shows with lots of "fire bombs" and related pyrotechnics that sharp images need a fast shutter speed and AF may need to be turned off and focus set manually. The f stop chosen should allow for adequate depth of field. Depending on your location and lens focal length the rocket blast may be hard to focus on with AF set by the camera. Just think things through and set what you think will work best for you. And remember that the light from the blast may distort image exposure.
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Feb 16, 2024 10:08:50   #
montephoto wrote:
I didn't want to hijack a different thread, so I started this new one:

I have shot all of my images in RAW for many years as a pro.

I convert the files to DNG upon download. DNG file are "slightly" smaller than NEF.
However, I have found that is not necessarily true for Canon files.
I am seeing posts telling others to use the proprietary/native RAW setting over using DNG.

After years of use I don't know of any disadvantages of DNG, but I like the advantage of the sidecar (.xmp)
being incorporated inside the DNG format so that it isn't lost or disassociated.
Other than that, I don't know of the advantages.

What are the explicit advantages of using the proprietary RAW vs DNG? CHG_Canon has mentioned this before.

Let's all keep it civil.
I didn't want to hijack a different thread, so I s... (show quote)


I use the native RAW file (NEF for me as I shoot Nikon). Sidecar files can accompany NEF files and be read (partially or fully) by the post processing program depending on the program. I see no need for DNG files in my workflow. If I ever had DNG files I would never discard the original RAW file.
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Feb 15, 2024 10:05:25   #
chasc wrote:
Hi,
Can anyone help me with this?
I have a Nikon D7000 and I shoot with RAW. How can I get the files to transfer to JPG or something, Currently, my Photoshop CS5 does not recognize them.

Any idea anyone?

Thanks for your help.


Download the free program from Nikon, Nikon Studio NX. It will open any NEF file. You can process them or just make Jpegs.

https://downloadcenter.nikonimglib.com/en/download/sw/249.html

Or download just about any third party RAW processor. DXO PL will recognize the NEF files.
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Feb 14, 2024 12:35:56   #
PhotoDerek wrote:
I shoot with Nikon, use Adobe Photo shop elements 2023 and it does not have lens correction capabilities. How important is lens correction in post production? Will it make my images better?


I have found that it depends on the lens used and what you are shooting. Wide angle primes often benefit from it. So do zoom lenses, especially those with shorter focal length range, like 16-35mm.

I shoot with Nikon lenses and use DXO PL for post processing. I have lens corrections implemented automatically. I can shut them off if needed.

If your software does not have this feature download a trial version of one that does and see if the corrections made are important for you.
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Feb 10, 2024 10:29:21   #
a6k wrote:
I have a SIRUI P-326 monopod and I'm quite happy with it. However, I'm thinking about adding a 3-feet attachment to the bottom end. Amazon has several at reasonable prices.

Does anyone have actual experience with:
A. adding feet to existing monopod?
B. a particular brand or model that was either notably good or notably bad?
C. experience with a monopod that has feet, even if it came with them, to suggest that this is a good or bad idea?
D. any "gotchas" to consider that are not immediately obvious?

No, I don't want to use a tripod.

Thanks in advance.
I have a SIRUI P-326 monopod and I'm quite happy w... (show quote)


IMO, the added feet reduce the functionality of a monopod. If you need three feet, get or use a tripod. That being said, having a monopod that can accept a replacement foot is an advantage. I usually use this cup like foot on my monopods:


https://leofotousa.com/products/leofoto-sc-70-monopod-replacement-foot-large-cup
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Feb 9, 2024 13:00:50   #
DWU2 wrote:
I think a key factor in your tripod choice should be the fact that you are six feet tall. Look carefully at the tripod specs to make sure you will be able to look through the camera's viewfinder when mounted on the tripod without stooping. If you live near a camera store (remember those?) it would be worth a trip to be able to handle the tripod and insure you'll be comfortable using it.


I agree completely with this post. Make sure the tripod can extend high enough for you since you are tall. I am 5 ft 10in and my travel tripod does not extend high enough. It has four leg sections so it collapses to a smaller size for placement in my checked suitcase for air travel. My regular tripod has three leg sections and I can extend it taller than I am.

When you look at the weight support ratings, get a tripod that will support 2 x what you will put on it. If the tripod has a center column, try not to use it. The tripod is more stable when it is not extended.

Check out all of the different models at the Benro website. They have purchased a number of tripod companies in recent years.

More info about selecting a tripod is here:

https://photographylife.com/how-to-choose-and-buy-a-tripod-for-a-dslr-camera
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Feb 7, 2024 10:50:28   #
I hope you or your wife called the credit card company and told them the charge was legitimate.

My wife and I try to remember to review credit card charges each month once the statement arrives so we can remember what the charge line means and we add a note in language that is meaningful to us if needed.

Like you I had a similar charge for $79, but mine was for an upgrade to DXO PL.
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Feb 7, 2024 10:45:53   #
Adding a teleconverter to a lens is just part of the issue of how one or more added tcs might affect the image captured in the camera. Your long lens technique also has a big impact on the image captured. Using the right tripod and ball head to improve stability has an impact as well as the optical issues involved. So do your exposure settings.

In my film days, I often used a 2x and a 1.4x tc at the same time on a 500mm f4 lens. But it was properly stabilized with a tripod and other supports. Using a rig like that hand held was not a viable solution.

Today I try and just use a 1.4x tc and only when I need the extra focal length.
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Feb 7, 2024 10:34:19   #
Based on my experience, it depends on the attitude of the person being photographed and the knowledge and skill of the photographer. My grand daughter loved to be posed for photos when she was about 4-12. As she got older, she was less interested in posed photos. My adult children, all in their 50s, will not pose for a photo for more than 5 seconds and the pictures taken reflect their rigidness and discomfort. Candids are what work best for them.

The main skill a photographer needs IMO is to keep the setting (and light) as simple as possible, like window light.
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Feb 5, 2024 12:20:43   #
kotography4u wrote:
BIG vote for the SouthWest quadrant of Ireland, especially for photographs. Your Dublin to Belfast leg won't give you nearly the beauty there is to see in the Ring of Kerry and other locales in the SouthWest quadrant. Rent a car so you can go where your whimsy takes you.


I vote for extra time in Ireland, in Dingle or thereabouts. My mother took a typical tour of Ireland with a lady friend. When it was over, my mother opted to stay by herself in a short term rental near Dingle for a week or 10 days. She said it was on of her best travel adventures ever. She just walked to town when needed and acted like any other local. I do not think she had access to a car rental for her extension. She was in her 70s when she did this.
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Feb 3, 2024 17:41:55   #
MJPerini wrote:
If it makes you happy to connect your camera by wire by all means do that.

Most modern card readers are way faster than any camera connection AND you can have multiple card readers.
There is a good work flow security reason as well when you come home from a shoot camera gets put away, card (s) go in a small box at the computer, as each card is transferred to the computer it goes in the "In Process box)
It stays there until all cards are ingested, and all backups are made, including off site or cloud. Once backups are made the card goes in the OK to reformat bin. 3 little plastic bins is great insurance and the whole process is easy and protected
We do the same thing weather shooting for clients or personal work
The camera never has to be out on a desk, no wear and tear on tiny internal connections.
If you do the same exact thing every time, you never have the risk of losing anything.
If it makes you happy to connect your camera by wi... (show quote)


When I got my first Nikon digital camera, a D200, way back when, I went to a Nikon School program that recommended to always use a card reader to download images. At that time they did not recommend using any computer's built in card reader slot as there was always a small chance that the computer could transfer something to the card that then got transferred to the camera. I know that many pho pho such recommendations, but I always wanted to follow the safest and most secure way to do things.

Being able to download directly from a camera can be a plus as well as recharging the battery without removing it from a camera. But what if a power strike takes place when you are doing this? I know this is a remote event, but things like this do happen from time to time, especially when you are in unfamiliar environments like a foreign country.
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Feb 3, 2024 10:02:08   #
gvarner wrote:
Why would anyone use a card reader when there are more direct ways to load photos onto a computer, like using a USB cable?


I use a card reader all the time. My card readers all come with cables.
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Feb 2, 2024 13:39:53   #
Basil wrote:
It did come with a user's manual, but oddly, they don't describe how to disassemble the legs for cleaning and/ or maintenance. (I'll give them feedback to suggest they include that in the manual). That said, disassembling the leg sections is extremely straightforward. Just loosen the twist lock, then continue to unscrew until it is completely free of the threads. Then the section just pulls out. There is a nylon sleeve that you can then remove (it is slotted and only goes back one way). I just tried it and it's really a no brainer.
It did come with a user's manual, but oddly, they ... (show quote)


Since you now own the tripod, I suggest you buy a set of the nylon sleeves that will fit each leg section. You may need to replace these at some time and having them on hand can be a big benefit. (I need to get replacement sleeves for my two Gitzo carbon fiber tripods.) If the twist locks on the legs are made from metal, they might be prone to corrosion from salt water or fresh water. I would read the manual to see what it says about this possibility and what to do about it.

Good luck with your new tripod. It looks like it is a great tripod.

One other tip. Depending on what the cost is for replacement feet that screw into the bottom of each leg, You might want to go to your local hardware store and buy three rubber cane caps to slip over each off the three feet. This will help extend their life and maybe protect them them corrosion too.
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