Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Posts for: AndyT
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Nov 19, 2018 12:21:24   #
SpyderJan wrote:
I have never had either camera Bob, but I can remember drooling over a Leica when I was young. I don't remember the model. Congrats on a great catch.


I just recently bought this Retina IIc beautifully engineered in Germany in 1957. When you open the lens cover the lens unit slides out. The Darkroom scans my negs to digital files.




 
Nov 14, 2018 10:15:17   #
I couldn't be happier with my X-T2 and the 18-135 that lives on it. My Nikon D-7100, a camera that I loved, now stays behind.
Nov 11, 2018 18:49:51   #
Sounds like you're closer than the minimum focusing distance which causes the lens to hunt. When you back up slightly you've achieved the minimum focusing distance, and the camera locks on.
Oct 28, 2018 11:16:44   #
BebuLamar wrote:
There nothing for you to worry about except if you were to mount your SB flashes on the cold shoe you don't want the cold shoe to short out the pins on flash foot. There is no way the SB trigger voltage and current can cause any damage to the sync contact of you Retina.


Thanks for your fast reply Bebu. With the flash foot fitting pretty snugly in the cold shoe already, what could I use to prevent a short from the pins?
Oct 28, 2018 11:01:21   #
Hello everyone. We've all read the posts about members inquiring about putting an older flash unit on a new digital and frying the electronics. This is not that. I have my "new" 1957 Retina IIc that I'm waiting for the first two rolls of film to come back. What a beautiful little camera engineering wise, but I digress. As you can see from the upper photo it has a cold shoe, not a hot shoe so you have to run a pc cord from the flash to the camera to complete the connection. All good so far. The lower photo shows there's an M selection on the shutter for bulbs, and an X for electronic flash. (The V stands for timer). Since there are no electronics at all in this camera, I would think that I would be able to toss my 1980's Nikon SB-28 or Nikon's SB-800 on it and not be at all concerned about frying anything. Ah-ha, but then there's the note in fine print in the manual. "NOTE: Do not use units flashed by means of heavy-duty relays or solenoids. Such units may completely destroy the shutter contacts." I'm against destroying the contacts. I remember using and old Honeywell 610, Ascor 1600, and Lumedyne flashes plugged into similar non electronic (Mamiya C-330's, Hasselblad 500c/m, Bronica SQ) units with no problems. The Lumedyne was so powerful you could jump start your car after the wedding in the winter. I'd buy another flash in 1/500th of a second, maybe something smaller, but Id rather not have to use one of those ice cube adaptors that sits on the shoe with the wire running to the pc connection. For that matter, since the camera is totally manual, and I would use the flash in manual or possibly auto I don't think it makes a difference what brand I get, i.e "for canon, for Nikon". Want to see if the flash works on the camera, but don't want to risk burning it up first. Re reading the post, for some of you it will be a trip down memory lane, and for the newer members I'm probably getting the ol' stink eye. That's what makes this site so great. Thanks, Andy


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Oct 26, 2018 11:02:03   #
rjaywallace wrote:
Consider mirrorless cameras from Fujifilm - X-T2 (probably used) or the new X-T3. Great features, exceptional image quality, creative options.


I agree with rjwallace. I have the excellent Fuji X-T2, and keep one lens on all the time. No fumbling or missing shots while changing lenses. The 18-135. Great image quality, excellent ergonomics. I think I paid $2700 for camera (platinum edition), lens, card and spare battery. The XT-20 was less, but not as much camera.
 
Oct 22, 2018 11:25:41   #
Oct 21, 2018 16:36:11   #
Photogirl17 wrote:
This Challenge is geared toward the Traveler in us all,
I don't know about all of you, but I have certain places out on the Highways to and from my destinations,
that I like to pull over and just look at and or Photograph the View at different times of the year..
Scenic Overlooks if you will..

The Image Below is from the Ridge overlooking Palo Duro Canyon, outside Amarillo, Texas.

In NH's White Mountains, Rt 112 called The Kangamangus Highway.




Oct 21, 2018 16:30:38   #
dyximan wrote:
The foliage has all but changed here in California/Nevada area, I am considering going to the East Coast, New England and or south/ mid Atlantic area. For the changing of their foliage leaf colors etc. Does anyone who ACTULLY LIVES in Any of these areas know if this is a good time to go, I can go anytime in the next two weeks or so. Or any other suggestions ideas or places to go for the viewing of such things.
This was taken last weekend in NH's White Mountains. Called that Kangamangus Highway.


Oct 12, 2018 09:53:13   #
Kiron Kid wrote:
How do you like it? I have a Kodak Retina Reflex III, in beautiful shape, with three Schneider lenses. Have yet to use it. 😢


Dear Kiron Kid. It's a gorgeous camera. The IIc has no meter so it's a little smaller than your III. When I opened the lens cover and the lens assembly slid out the machinist at work said it looked like something a jeweler would make. Beautiful worksmanship. Just sent in the first roll today.
Oct 12, 2018 09:19:57   #
After just purchasing a beautiful 1956 Kodak Retina IIc, I just mailed my first roll to The Darkroom. Nice to hear positive things from others.
 
Oct 10, 2018 07:38:43   #
AndyT wrote:
Gary I just went back and checked. The lighthouse picture above was taken at iso 100, f.22, for exactly two minutes. I remember it was a bright overcast day.


And what looks like mist was choppy water and waves.
Oct 10, 2018 07:36:54   #
GKR wrote:
I have tried every shutter speed on my camera. I have even tried to get slow exposure using manual mode. I know that I'm doing something very wrong, but I just haven't figured it out yet.


Gary I just went back and checked. The lighthouse picture above was taken at iso 100, f.22, for exactly two minutes. I remember it was a bright overcast day.
Oct 10, 2018 07:24:06   #
AndyT wrote:
Gary my 10 stop ND filter came with a conversion chart. You take your regular exposure, and look for the corresponding shutter speed on the chart. Could easily be a couple minutes of exposure.
.
This is a two minute exposure.


Oct 10, 2018 07:20:22   #
Gary my 10 stop ND filter came with a conversion chart. You take your regular exposure, and look for the corresponding shutter speed on the chart. Could easily be a couple minutes of exposure.
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