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kodachrome slides
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Feb 11, 2013 18:50:20   #
0627ramram32
 
This is in response to the comments about static electricity: get a hold of a grounding strap made for people who work on computers. One end goes around your wrist, and the other plugs into the ground (ROUND) plug on a three-prong electric outlet. Next, get yourself a 2 or 3 inch camel hair brush (which I'm told won't create static like artificial fibers) and brush each side of the film while blowing gently across the surface of the film. Restrain your blowing gusto to minimize flying spit. That will remove 99% of the dust that isn't actually caught in the emulsion; for that, learn how to use your Clone Tool.

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Feb 11, 2013 20:43:50   #
Brian in Whitby
 
If you are at all in doubt about which hole is the ground, you can use plumbing pipes as long as they are matal (usually copper) pipes.

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Feb 11, 2013 20:59:41   #
ArgusSnap1
 
Hi-I did a lot of b/w neg enlarging in the darkroom for a number of years. I used to use the Kodak Film cleaner(which I still have a bit) and a "Static Master Brush"(still available.) Any ideas about this brush for cleaning slides/negs in the digital enviornment? It worked well in the d/r along with canned air. I have a Minolta Dimage Scan Duall III that I have used on slides and works well--they were not excedingly sharp as digital can be today--but I really don't want that. The photos taken on a tripod were sharp enough and handheld shots appeared to be a little soft. That may depend on the lens,f#,Shutter speed etc than the scanner. I also bought from a friend a Nikon Coolscan V ED which I have not downloaded the software correctly yet. I also have the Epson V 700 flat bed scanner still in the box about 4 yrs. old--been too preocupied with other responscibilities to set up. Hopefully by summer I'll get it going.

But back to my main inquirey about the Static Master Brush and use in the dig D/R if any ill affects? I had not use one when I scanned with the Minolta scanner. A Kolinsky Sable watercolor brush is even softer than a camel's hair brush and comes in rounds and flats of various sizes and the best are not cheap.The flats are 1", 3/4", 1/2", 1/4" which any would work but the 1/2" pretty reasonable compared to the larger sizes. An good one is not that expensive considering everything else in Photography.
Thanks every one.

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Feb 11, 2013 21:16:50   #
Mortimer Levy
 
Have purchased from Hammacher-Schlemmer a converter for 1,200$ Very expensive but does 50 slides at a time and renders them perfect and downloads them into you computer. mortimer.levy@me .com

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Feb 11, 2013 21:39:02   #
jimbrown3
 
Re scanned some slides at 24bit color,12,800 dpi on the Epson V700 and they held up very well. File sizes are BIG, 540mb.
Mortimer, what is the brand you got from Hammacher ?

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Feb 11, 2013 21:59:56   #
DebAnn (a regular here)
 
I'm at a loss to understand why you would need to scan at 12,800 dpi which I'm assuming could print something the size of my living room wall! This picture was scanned from a BW negative at only 600 dpi and sized to about 7" x 6.5". I get a pop-up warning that such a big scan could be hard on my computer. Could you explain what I'm missing, please?
jimbrown3 wrote:
Re scanned some slides at 24bit color,12,800 dpi on the Epson V700 and they held up very well. File sizes are BIG, 540mb.
Mortimer, what is the brand you got from Hammacher ?



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Feb 11, 2013 22:02:55   #
Papa Joe
 
DebAnn wrote:
I'm at a loss to understand why you would need to scan at 12,800 dpi which I'm assuming could print something the size of my living room wall! This picture was scanned from a BW negative at only 600 dpi and sized to about 7" x 6.5". I get a pop-up warning that such a big scan could be hard on my computer. Could you explain what I'm missing, please?
jimbrown3 wrote:
Re scanned some slides at 24bit color,12,800 dpi on the Epson V700 and they held up very well. File sizes are BIG, 540mb.
Mortimer, what is the brand you got from Hammacher ?
I'm at a loss to understand why you would need to ... (show quote)


Hi DebAnn,
600 dpi is the highest I used on scanning my slides and I've made quality 11X14 inch prints. That B&W you posted is good and sharp. Nice shot.

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Feb 11, 2013 22:06:17   #
WAL
 
I don't think it works with Kodachrome or B&W

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Feb 11, 2013 22:09:21   #
WAL
 
http://www.scantips.com/basics13.html
and David Brooks blog and CD. He writes in Shutterbug. David Brooks worked with Ansel Adam and does know what he is talking about.

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Feb 11, 2013 22:41:54   #
GoofyNewfie
 
WAL wrote:
I don't think it works with Kodachrome or B&W


Using "Quote Reply" will help us know what IT is.
Just guessing you are referring to Digital Ice?

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Feb 11, 2013 22:53:47   #
bcheary
 
I have hundreds of 35mm slides which I have either or am currently in the process of converting to digital. I have been using the ION slides2pc. Not very expensive but time consuming. My success depends on the quality of the slides. Those of poorer quality I end up converting to black and white. Check out
www.ionaudio.com/slides2pc

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Feb 11, 2013 23:25:42   #
dickhrm
 
I found it on line, both on Canon's and Amazon.com's site, but didn't see mention of it being used to convert slides to digital. In any event, I have a scanner/printer that is quite adequate for those tasks, hence don't really need, nor want to pay for, a multipurpose device.

So what might be recommended in the way of a device for strictly converting slides to digital, with as good a dust removal mechanism as possible?

I have one that I got a couple years ago for about $80, but I have two problems with it. One, the little brush that came with it doesn't get rid of the dust that well. The other is that vivid colors, such as in sunrises and sunsets, don't come thru that well.

Thanks.

GWR100 wrote:
I have a Canon MP980 and have converted hundreds of slides and its very easy and all are perfect. Don't bother with the cheap converters, they don't work. Hope this helps.

mrtoad90 wrote:
i am retired after years and years of taking kodachrome slides - switched a number of years ago to digital - with the spare time i have now i would like to put the slides into a digital format - any suggestions to help with this process would be helpful

if you suggest a scanner - which one do you recommend

thanks

mr toad
I have a Canon MP980 and have converted hundreds o... (show quote)

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Feb 11, 2013 23:54:31   #
BHC
 
From Wikipedia:

"Digital ICE is used to detect scratches and dust during transparent film scan and is not applicable for opaque document scanning. Where Chromogenic black-and-white films are supported by Digital ICE, other black-and-white films containing metallic silver (which form from silver halides during the development process of the film) are not. This is because the long wave infrared light passes through the slide but not through dust particles. The silver particles reflect the infrared light in a similar manner to dust particles, thus respond equally in visible light and infrared light. A similar phenomenon also prevents Kodak Kodachrome slides from being scanned with Digital ICE (Kodachrome's cyan layer absorbs infrared)."

Now try this:

http://laughingbunny.wordpress.com/2012/06/26/cleaning-restoring-a-35mm-slide/

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Feb 12, 2013 08:22:59   #
dickhrm
 
I can see this process being effective for digitally reproducing a handful of slides, but when one has upwards of 1000 or more, the time involved might be more than many of us can spare. I'm looking for a device that can handle both getting rid of the dust and scanning slides, all in one motion, with reasonable good color reproduction, if such a one exists. Thanks again.

Mogul wrote:
From Wikipedia:

"Digital ICE is used to detect scratches and dust during transparent film scan and is not applicable for opaque document scanning. Where Chromogenic black-and-white films are supported by Digital ICE, other black-and-white films containing metallic silver (which form from silver halides during the development process of the film) are not. This is because the long wave infrared light passes through the slide but not through dust particles. The silver particles reflect the infrared light in a similar manner to dust particles, thus respond equally in visible light and infrared light. A similar phenomenon also prevents Kodak Kodachrome slides from being scanned with Digital ICE (Kodachrome's cyan layer absorbs infrared)."

Now try this:

http://laughingbunny.wordpress.com/2012/06/26/cleaning-restoring-a-35mm-slide/
From Wikipedia: br br "Digital ICE is used t... (show quote)

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Feb 12, 2013 08:33:23   #
jimbrown3
 
Hi DebAnn and Papa Joe,
Thanks for your input. I don't print my shots. I used to be an active provider of stock photography. What I am trying to replicate is the same fidelity in digital as on existing film so they can be re-submitted. 100% seems to be the magic number and I am experimenting to see if it is possible, and what magnification. Great B&W.

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