Ugly Hedgehog - Photography
Home Active Topics Newest Pictures Search Login Register
Main Photography Discussion
A few questions I just have to ask of those who own multiple cameras
Page <<first <prev 4 of 11 next> last>>
May 22, 2024 09:44:05   #
reguli Loc: Uruguay
 
I have two Canon cameras, 7D and 5D mark III. When I travel I use both with different lenses, but at home I mainly use the 5D. Now everyone is in love with mirrorless cameras, but my philosophy is what can I do with a mirrorless that I can't do with my cameras. Nothing different or better, so I'll stick with my cameras until they fail dramatically and it's time to move on.

Reply
May 22, 2024 09:44:08   #
User ID
 
A. T. wrote:
What no one has said is that with all of the hype and explanations of why you should switch from your DSLRs that are giving you exactly what you want to a different camera is they won't render a better image at all. A mirrorless camera might make taking the photo easier and faster but certainly no better image than your "old, outdated" DSLRs. Stay with what has made you happy for so many years. At the end of the day, a great photo is a great photo.

Unsaid ??!?!?

UNHEARD by whoever is living under a rock, but most certainly NOT unsaid. Come out into the sunshine ... and listen a bit !

Reply
May 22, 2024 09:44:18   #
APSHEPPARD
 
You have already gotten some very good perspectives which I will only reinforce. I have Canon R3 and R5 along with Olympus OMD M1 Mark III. I use them all. To me the R5 has the most features but the battery on the R3 is unbeatble for my purposes. That said, I use the OMD M1 Mark III the most because as I get older the weight really does make a difference! I do agree with one of the earlier comments that once you go mirrorless, you will most likely stay in that camp so even if you start with the lens converter, I would be inclined to give mirrorless a try. I have also found that a couple of the NYC dealers and several of the used camera dealers offer surprsingly good allowances for trades so you might want to consider letting go of some of that gear to assist in making a move. If you do look at that options, there is huge variation from one used source to another so I recommend getting multiple quotes Just sayin'....

Reply
 
 
May 22, 2024 10:02:08   #
Mojaveflyer Loc: Denver, CO
 
Up to last year I was shooting with a Canon 5D Mk2 and a T-6 crop sensor. They were 11 and 12 years old and last year I invested in a Canon R and a R7 crop sensor. I bought an adapter for each body so I could continue to shoot with my old lenses. I use the full size sensor R for most things but I shoot a lot of aircraft and the crop sensor became my go to camera for aviation photography and other things where a little longer lens would be helpful. I love both of the and like the choice of using either one depending on my purpose.

My lenses work well and I don't have any plans to retire the lenses I have. Good luck!

Reply
May 22, 2024 10:03:47   #
Longshadow Loc: Audubon, PA, United States
 
A. T. wrote:
What no one has said is that with all of the hype and explanations of why you should switch from your DSLRs that are giving you exactly what you want to a different camera is they won't render a better image at all. A mirrorless camera might make taking the photo easier and faster but certainly no better image than your "old, outdated" DSLRs. Stay with what has made you happy for so many years. At the end of the day, a great photo is a great photo.

Perception...
Desires...
Requirements....

I'm still using my T1i and H-1.

Not "said" earlier, but implied.

Reply
May 22, 2024 10:05:19   #
imagemeister Loc: mid east Florida
 
I started with Canon in 2011 when I semi-retired. I have 2 Canon bodies now and several lenses. I keep and use them - mostly for nostalgic reasons. In 2012 I got a Sony NEX-3 and a A77II in 2013 then A99 in 2018. Couple years ago I got the A68 and RX10m4 and last year a Sony A9. Today I purchase lenses mostly for nostalgic reasons and adapt. I am 76 and nostalgia plays a very increasing role in my decision making vs logic ! I do like the nostalgia, user experience and challenge of using DSLR but when technical objectivity matters, I use SONY mirror less ! 8-)
.

Reply
May 22, 2024 10:17:19   #
photoman43
 
luvmypets wrote:
Let me start by saying I have 3. A Nikon D7000, a D750 and a D810. There was/is nothing wrong with the D7000 but I wanted a full frame so I debated the D750 and the D810. I had decided on the 810 but a situation arose that took a chunk of my cash so I purchased the D750. I love that camera and still use it. The desire for the D810 never went away so when I was able I purchased a refurbished one. I love it, too and use the 750 and 810 pretty equally. The D7000 sits in a case unused. There are some things I don't get rid of.

So now I'm having a G.A.S. attack for the D850. Why, I ask myself. The 750 and 810 do everything I need and lately I haven't been taking any photos so why invest in something that may do a lot of sitting.

Onto my questions to those of you that have multiple cameras. Why do you have more than one or 2? Do you use all of them? Will you purchase more and why or why not?

I know some will wonder why I don't jump on the mirrorless train but I don't want to start over with having to buy new lenses in addition to a new camera. Yes, I know there is a converter but I think that is handicapping the advanced features of mirrorless. Plus, I think that there are a few things that still need improving such as battery life and the fact that there is nothing covering the sensor making dust spots more of an issue.

Thanks for your insight. I appreciate your time to answer my questions.

Dodie
Let me start by saying I have 3. A Nikon D7000, a... (show quote)


I shoot with multiple Nikon bodies, one mirrorless and the rest DSLRs. One DSLR is a crop sensor, D500. The others are full frame.

I do a lot of nature shooting so I usually use two cameras with different lenses. For birds, the D500 with long tele. For other stuff, the full frame with another tele lens. And sometimes a body just for macro. I do not like to change lenses in the field and often shoot out of my car or a blind.

I sold my D810 for a D850. Prior to my D850, the D810 was the best Nikon DSLR I have ever owned or used. Now the D850 is. Or was. My mirrorless is a Z9. It is a fantastic camera. In many ways it has replaced or displaced my D850.

If I were you I would consider moving to mirrorless with a Z8 or a Z9 instead of a D850. Your decision depends on a host of factors unique to you: what do you shoot the most? What F mount lenses do you use? Are they good enough for a D850 or Z8 or Z9? How much can afford for new bodies and lenes?

Reply
 
 
May 22, 2024 10:18:33   #
jlocke Loc: Austin, TX
 
I'm down to just one camera body (well, my wife has the D7200). Last year I was the owner of a D750, which I had for several years, and a Z6ii. I wasn't really satisfied with the Z6ii, so when Nikon offered a 'trade-up' event, I traded-in my Z6ii (and some cash) for a Z8. I'm very satisfied with the Z8 and found I use it all the time. So recently I sold my D750 along with some older F-mount lenses.

For my Z8, I now have this native glass:
NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/4 S
NIKKOR Z 180-600mm f/5.6-6.3 VR
NIKKOR Z 24-200mm f/4-6.3 VR (bought refurbished from Nikon)
NIKKOR Z 70-200mm f/2.8 VR S (bought refurbished from Nikon)
NIKKOR Z 85mm f/1.8 S (bought refurbished from Nikon)

Buying refurbished from Nikon has saved me lots of money, and I'm confident in the quality. For the 85mm, I'd been looking at one of the Chinese lenses (Viltrox 85mm f/1.8) that I've recently seen reviewed, and it was affordable at around $400. Nikon offered their 85mm f/1.8 for $499, so I went for that deal. I feel like I'm pretty set for Z lenses at this point.

I love my Z8, and I probably average about 100 shots a day, mostly birds and wildlife in my backyard.

Reply
May 22, 2024 10:34:05   #
Iron Sight Loc: Utah
 
Multiple Camera's keeps dust off your sensors!!! 😀

Reply
May 22, 2024 10:56:49   #
tiphareth51 Loc: Somewhere near North Pole, Alaska
 
Interesting question. I own 5 Nikon DSLR bodies and 7 lenses. The question is why? At my mid-seventies age (the twilight years) taking on the task of learning a new system would be frustrating and expensive. The lenses in my possession all have a purpose suited to my 'style' or favorite subject preferences. With the advent of 'mirrorless' DSLR's are no longer being supported by their manufacturers. So if a camera fails for whatever reason, I still have options. The likelyhood of my camera bodies outliving me is real. Of the bodies owned, ( one D850, two D810, one D500, one D750), the D810 is my favorite.
That's my two cents on the subject.
Tip

Reply
May 22, 2024 11:00:37   #
RolandDieter
 
Most of my photography is travel, and I take two or three lightweight m4/3 bodies each with a different range zoom. This way I do not have to change lenses with can be a problem if traveling with a group that keeps moving on. I also have a a7c full frame because the m4/3 crop factor limits wide angles. For sports I use APS or m4/3 with fast lenses that weigh more than my travel gear.

Reply
 
 
May 22, 2024 11:27:01   #
Orphoto Loc: Oregon
 
For most of my work i am perfectly happy with only one body at a time. However there are times when i use 2 or even 3 at once. For instance if shooting star trails at night it takes quite a long time tying up one body. Same is true for those who do timelapses. For fireworks i will run 2 simultaneously just to have the benefit of 2 lenses, or one in vertical mode. Examine your own tendencies and think back on those times when you felt your gear was limiting you.

Next concept is running one at a time but having multiple bodies so you can play to their strengths. Look at each one and ask which capability is too limited. I bought a used d5 for low level light work, but frankly it doesnt see much use.

This place is full of grumpy old men in a chorus saying that your results wont improve. To some extent true, but less than the full picture. The feature set on the d850 made everything easier to achieve than the d810. Night images have way fewer hot noisy pixels to clean up. Liveview is far better implemented. The only true downside is a somewhat clunkier shutter sound. Used d850s are currently flooding the market. Lots to choose from.

Having said all this i recently took the leap to a z8. Again the featues make getting images easier. Yes i use my top flight f mount lenses via the adapter. By the way if you are deliberate and use manual focus this is a huge improvement.

Is there a "right" answer? Not really. I suggest hitting up friends and trying other bodies just to see. You may also find that size/weight are the most important factors. If so, never get rid of that 750.

Reply
May 22, 2024 11:50:47   #
elee950021 Loc: New York, NY
 
luvmypets wrote:
Let me start by saying I have 3. A Nikon D7000, a D750 and a D810. There was/is nothing wrong with the D7000 but I wanted a full frame so I debated the D750 and the D810. I had decided on the 810 but a situation arose that took a chunk of my cash so I purchased the D750. I love that camera and still use it. The desire for the D810 never went away so when I was able I purchased a refurbished one. I love it, too and use the 750 and 810 pretty equally. The D7000 sits in a case unused. There are some things I don't get rid of.

So now I'm having a G.A.S. attack for the D850. Why, I ask myself. The 750 and 810 do everything I need and lately I haven't been taking any photos so why invest in something that may do a lot of sitting.

Onto my questions to those of you that have multiple cameras. Why do you have more than one or 2? Do you use all of them? Will you purchase more and why or why not?

I know some will wonder why I don't jump on the mirrorless train but I don't want to start over with having to buy new lenses in addition to a new camera. Yes, I know there is a converter but I think that is handicapping the advanced features of mirrorless. Plus, I think that there are a few things that still need improving such as battery life and the fact that there is nothing covering the sensor making dust spots more of an issue.

Thanks for your insight. I appreciate your time to answer my questions. Dodie
Let me start by saying I have 3. A Nikon D7000, a... (show quote)


Dodie!

I have multiple cameras for a variety of reasons! I retired from my 40-year NYC photo studio and custom lab business in 2008. Back then, we always bought two of everything in terms of equipment, well, almost everything as backup as we couldn't afford to be unable to carry on our business if something broke! Time is money!

After retiring and carrying on my love of fashion, portrait and fine figure art, I shoot weekly and have over a thousand model shoots and over 1M images since 2005 when I first bought a digital Nikon D50 camera. Through the years I have managed to buy multiple cameras, both Nikon and Canon as well as others that interest me such as medium format Mamiyas and digital backs. I purchased mostly Nikon cameras: D50, D70, D80, D200, D300, D3, D3S, D3X, D700, D7100, D800, D750 and D810! Canons include 1Ds, 1Ds Mk2, 1Ds Mk3 and a 5D Mk2. I also have over 30 Nikon and Canon prime and zoom lenses as well!

By having two bodies of each model, besides having a backup body, I can shoot with one camera while resting the second body. After the D700s and D800s bodies, I stopped buying them new at full retail prices:
both the D700 and D800 bodies were $2995! I got smart and bought the D3, D3S, D3X, D750s and D810s at 28% of OEM list ($800 and less) and would buy what I call "Brand-Used," excellent-conditioned bodies with low shutter counts!

Currently, I'm using two D750s and two D810s! I didn't buy the D850 for the following reasons:
A. For me, a built-in flash is a necessity, I shoot using it as fill with a modifier.
B. I don't need 45 MPs! I currently shoot with the D810s at 1.2X crop RAW with files around 21 MP.
C. I have tons of CF and SD cards which are cheap, unlike the expensive XQD cards of the D850.
D. The D850 requires EN-EL15a batteries while the D7100, D800 and D810 uses the EN-EL15.
E. The D850 body new is still $2200 while a refurb is $1900. Still too rich for my needs!

For the hell of it, I also bought two "brand-used" Nikon Z5 bodies and two FTZ adapters. After having used them for over a year (20K shots), they're fine but I gravitate back to my D810s!

Be well! Ed

Reply
May 22, 2024 12:23:06   #
SuperflyTNT Loc: Manassas VA
 
luvmypets wrote:
Thank you, User ID! You make some good points which I will add into my "pro" and "con" columns. I appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions

Dodie


I agree with User ID, a Z makes much more sense than a D850. Rather than handicapping you with FTZ adapter it can enhance the use of most F mount lenses by gaining the advantages of mirrorless. And there is absolutely no IQ loss with an adapter. The only caveat would be older screw drive lenses.

I not only use multiple cameras, I shoot three completely different systems. Nikon full frame I have a Z9 & Z7. The Z9 is my go to and the Z7 I use for stuff like Lensbaby and other manual focus lenses. For M4/3 I have the OM-1 which is great for travel and it excels at a lot of stuff I like to do like night city shooting and any long exposure stuff. It’s also great for macro with the Olympus 90mm 2:1 macro lens. And when I’m kayaking it’s my Sony RX10MIV. My least favorite to use but the only camera I’ve found that can give me a 24-600mm equivalent focal range with excellent focus tracking that’s easily handled in a long skinny kayak.

Reply
May 22, 2024 12:25:12   #
PHRubin Loc: Nashville TN USA
 
Let me say simply that using DSLR lenses with an adapter on a mirrorless does not hurt anything other than a little impact on size and weight. Sharpness and focusing are unaffected. True, however, mirrorless lenses are often better.

Reply
Page <<first <prev 4 of 11 next> last>>
If you want to reply, then register here. Registration is free and your account is created instantly, so you can post right away.
Main Photography Discussion
UglyHedgehog.com
Copyright 2011-2024 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.